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Wiping the sweat from my brow I called a halt to the crew. Phil and I dumped our packs and found a comfy boulder to rest on. I looked back to where the last guys were coming from back down the trail. They had stopped talking a while back and marched slowly along the dirt trail. Phil produced an energy-bar he'd saved from breakfast and began to munch on it as I drained another water bottle. After the refreshing drink I laid back against the rock and stared up at the pine trees. But a moment later, hearing grumble about sore legs, I sat up, grinning, "By the map we only have another couple hours." After one look Phil recognized the sarcasm and followed suit, "Is that all? Whoohoo, Yippee hooray. Lets jump for joy." "Well this is one of the hardest legs of the trip you know," I said more seriously. "The altitude change is about 3,000 ft. and it is at least 10 miles." "I'll just be happy when it's over and I'm can sleep." "Yup." We sat there for a few more minutes then I got up and yelled for everyone to get ready to start moving again. I donned my pack and tightened the straps, and after making sure everyone else was ready, started off down the winding trail to the night's campsite. It was our fifth day in the Philmont Scout Reservation in New Mexico, the halfway point of the trek. I as the Crew Leader was responsible for the other 11 members of the crew, including 4 adults. I was in charge, and amazingly the adults rarely tried to take over, although they would strongly advise me what to do in some situations. Phil, with the exception of me, the oldest scout and the Chaplain for the trip, was my second. Together we dealt with problems of making sure everyone carried the right amount of stuff in their pack to who had to cook and cleanup each day. The trip had gone well so far, no injuries, and the worst problem had been a faulty backpack. As I walked I thought about the upcoming campsite. Supposedly this one had running water from a solar powered pump"”so had the last night's site but the tank was too low to use for anything but cooking because the of how cloudy it had been of late. But today was bright and shinny, and hot, so I didn't think there would be a problem. It was simply amazing hiking out there, the mountains covered in tall trees that dug into the rocky soil, the beautiful sky, when visible. Even in the midst of strenuous exercise I still enjoyed it. Especially reaching the peaks of the mountains, today was especially interesting because we spotted Baldy Mountain in the distance, the tallest peak in Philmont 12,500ft., and would be the hardest climb of the trip. It had looked so far away it was hard to believe I would be on top of it in a few days. Besides in the campsites, we only saw one other group of people during the entire 12 day trek and the only human sounds were our own. Each camp was an island of civilization in a great sea of wilderness, and a wonderful solace to end the day's hike. We had been walking a long time today. Waking up at 6:00, we had eaten and broken camp down quickly so we would make it to the next campsite before nightfall. We had begun hiking at 7:00 a.m. and besides hourly five minute breaks, and only stopped twice"”for lunch and to put mole skin on Mr. Smith's feet. Usually I walked up front with Phil but a few times someone would ask to be the lead man and I would let them. We would chat for a good portion of it: complain about soreness or complain about other's complaining we only complained to each other because leaders can't show weakness, hehe, talk about home, good food which was non-existent out there, and the day's activities. And, sometimes we'd walk for an hour in silence. As we rounded a bend and approached the slope up the last small mountain of the days hike, I noticed a flash of light in the distance. "Uh ohhh." Phil looked at me questioningly. "Lightening." I explained. "Oh Great!" He said moodily, "You think we'll make it before it hits?" I looked at it a while appraisingly and replied, "Hope so. Pull out the map real quick." He reached into my pack and pulled the large map out, folding it so only today's hike was shown. By then the adults had come up to see why we stopped. "What's going on?" My dad asked. I pointed at the approaching storm as I measured the distanced left to travel on the map, "That's a problem, we need to make it over the last ridge before that hits or we'll have to wait it out, which would mean getting into camp real late, real cold, and real tired." It may have been hot during the days but the temperature dropped drastically once the sun set, especially after a rain. Mr. Nick looked at the map, "You're right, we'll have to pick up the pace." Thunder boomed ominously in the distance as I turned to rest of the crew, most of whom had already taken advantage of the break to sit down, "Guys, I know you're tired, we all are, but we have to start moving faster if we want to beat that storm over the ridge." A few groans of protest came but they all got back up. "Lets get moving we can't waste time." We set out at brisk pace, the sky began to darken and I could see the rain falling at a distance, Phil and I were back at the front. We both knew this was pretty serious, if we didn't get over in time, we could all be in trouble. The storm could force us to wait on this side of the slope, an hour away from camp. If it lasted too long we would be left with a choice of trying to hike at night on wet ground, or trying to set up tents on the side of a mountain. Another problem was food and water. All the food we carried was dehydrated, needing lots of water in order to cook and eat, and we only brought water for the hike, not for cooking. Even if the campsite didn't have running water, it would have a stream--which was fine since we had filters--but if we didn't get there we would have no food and little water. I looked back and could see strain in faces, they also new, but that did not change exhaustion. Mr. Watkins was lagging behind so I slowed down a little, there was no point in getting over if we all didn't make it. Halfway up it was beginning to look doubtful, the wind was picking up and everyone was getting out rain gear to prepare for the storm. I voiced my doubts to Phil and he said we might as well keep going until the lighting got too close. So we did. The thunder grew in volume and the echoes magnified the noise to a dull roar sometimes. Then suddenly it began to ebb. The wind died down and lightening came less frequently. I exchanged relieved looks with Phil after a bit, but kept the pace up--I didn't want to take chances. Eventually it hit us, but by then it was nothing more then a heavy rain. We kept moving, if slower, and made it over the ridge with no other problems. That night I enjoyed the meal a little more and slept a little deeper realizing how much is important that easily goes unnoticed until something threatens to take it away.
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Wiping the sweat from my brow I called a halt to the crew. Phil and I dumped our packs and found a comfy boulder to rest on. I looked back to where the last guys were coming from back down the trail. They had stopped talking a while back and marched slowly along the dirt trail. Phil produced an energy-bar he'd saved from breakfast and began to munch on it as I drained another water bottle. After the refreshing drink I laid back against the rock and stared up at the pine trees. But a moment later, hearing grumble about...
to a dull roar sometimes. Then suddenly it began to ebb. The wind died down and lightening came less frequently. I exchanged relieved looks with Phil after a bit, but kept the pace up--I didn't want to take chances. Eventually it hit us, but by then it was nothing more then a heavy rain. We kept moving, if slower, and made it over the ridge with no other problems. That night I enjoyed the meal a little more and slept a little deeper realizing how much is important that easily goes unnoticed until something threatens to take it away.
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Physical fitness can most aptly be...Physical fitness can most aptly be defined as the body"s ability to complete daily activities without becoming too sore, without becoming too fatigued, and without getting out of breath. The concept of physical fitness involves three distinct factors, which are: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, and nutrition. It is imperative for one to allot an ample amount of time to each of these factors, as well as following a program specially suited to his or her needs. A major component of physical wellness is cardiovascular fitness. Cardiovascular fitness is the ability of the circulatory system to provide oxygen-rich blood for energy to the body's organs. A person's pulse is the throbbing of arteries produced by the contractions of the heart. One may read his or her pulse at either the wrist or the neck. A person's resting heart rate is his or her heart rate at rest. To calculate this, one may simply count the beats of the heart per minute. A person's maximum heart rate is the maximum number of times his or her heart can beat in one minute. To calculate this, one may simply subtract his or her age from 220. The target heart rate is the number of times one's heart should beat per minute when exercising. This is between 60- and 90-percent of one's maximum heart rate. To increase cardiovascular fitness, one should develop a program that follows the principles of "FIT" training. For frequency, one should do an exercise between 3 and 5 times per week. For intensity, one should base how hard he or she exercises on the target heart rate. For time, one should start slowly, but gradually increase to approximately 45 to 60 minutes per day. Before engaging in this type of program, one should stretch and loosen up his or her muscles, and he or she should allow the muscles to cool down after an exercise, mostly by walking until he or she is near the resting heart rate. An example of a good cardiovascular fitness program that I would follow is: Day 1 at track: Warm-up 5 minutes Slow jog 20 minutes Walk 5 minutes Slow jog 20 minutes Cool-down 5 minutes Total time spent: 55 minutes Day 2 at pool: Warm-up 5 minutes Slow swim 15 minutes Rest 5 minutes Intense swim 15 minutes Cool-down 10 minutes Total time spent: 50 minutes Day 3 at track: Warm-up 5 minutes 2-lap warm-up jog 5 minutes Walk 5 minutes 2 mile run Start at 14 minutes, would seek to reduce time on each occasion Cool-down 10 minutes Total time spent: 40 minutes Another major component of physical wellness is muscular strength. Muscular strength is the ability of your body to lift a certain amount of weight at a given time. When working on muscular strength, one should know what "sets" and "repetitions" are. A set is a number of repetitions for which one performs a certain exercise. A repetition is the act of lifting and lowering a weight once. A maximum lift is the most amount of weight one can lift for one repetition. When beginning a weight training program, one should always start slowly, to get the body used to performing strenuous exercises. Moreover, a spotter should always be used when performing exercises. Lastly, before lifting, one should stretch the muscles he or she is about to work. An example of a strength training program that I would follow is: Upper Body Workout: Chest "“ Bench Press 4 sets: 1 warm-up set of low weight, 3 sets of 6-8 reps at high weight Back "“ Lat Pulldowns 4 sets: 1 warm-up set of low weight, 3 sets of 6-8 reps at high weight Lower Body Workout: Quads "“ Leg Extension 4 sets: 1 warm-up set of low weight, 3 sets of 6-8 reps at high weight Calves "“ Calf Raise 4 sets: 1 warm-up set of low weight, 3 sets of 6-8 reps at high weight A final major component of physical wellness is nutrition. A simple way of eating properly is to follow the food pyramid. The six areas of the pyramid are: grains, vegetables, fruits, fats and oils, milk and dairy products, and meat/beans/fish/nuts. For someone following the routines mentioned above, he should have 10 ounces of grains, 3.5 cups of vegetables, 2.5 cups of fruits, 3 cups of milk, 7 ounces of meats and beans, and 8 teaspoons of oils daily. Not eating properly could lead to several eating disorders. Obesity is an eating disorder where one becomes excessively fat. This disorder could lead to carious diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and sleep apnea. Another eating disorder is anorexia, which is excessive starvation. A final eating disorder is bulimia, which is when one engages in binge eating, followed by vomiting, abusing laxatives, or excessive exercising. All of these diseases more than often lead to death. To avoid nutritional diseases, one should have a balanced diet. A final part of nutrition is body fat. For young males, it is considered healthy to have between 10 and 25 percent body fat. For young females, it is considered health to have between 20 and 35 percent body fat. Physical wellness can be described as the ability to perform daily activities without soreness, fatigue, or loss of breath. To ensure of this, one should tailor a physical wellness program to his needs. This program should include the three areas of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, and nutrition.   

Physical fitness can most aptly be defined as the body"s ability to complete daily activities without becoming too sore, without becoming too fatigued, and without getting out of breath. The concept of physical fitness involves three distinct factors, which are: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, and nutrition. It is imperative for...

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