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Describe and explain the importance of coastal environments around the world and how conflict may occur over these environments.
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There are many different varieties of coastal environments around the world that have their own importance and conflicts. One of the most important coastal environments is the Great Barrier Reef off the North East coast of Australia. This environment is home to at least 1500 species of fish, 350 types of hard coral and 5000 varieties of molluscs e.g. shells. Also six of the world's seven species of marine turtle live in the Great Barrier Reef, as well as other rare aquatic animals. The Marine Park is home to the world's most important, but threatened, Dugong populations and around 54%...
these conflicts show that if you interfere with nature on one side of the beach, you can cause problems on the other side. This will not only cause problems for people but for many species of wildlife that have their habitats on the beach. If there is no beach material there, then they won't be able to survive as there will be no food for them. It would disrupt the whole food chain. They have to decide what's more important: saving Holderness and ruining beaches elsewhere, or just letting nature erode the cliffs and the villages on them.

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Benin, independent nation of W Africa,...Benin, independent nation of W Africa, formerly called Dahomey. Once a French protectorate, it is a country of 40 ethnic tribal groups and a low-level economy. Land and Economy Located in the bulge on the S side of W Africa, Benin is bordered by Nigeria, Toga, Berkina Faso, and Niger, with 75 mi 121km on the Gulf of Guinea. The coast is hot and humid, and there are two rainy and two dry seasons; average annual rainfall is 32in 813mm. Benin has three plateaus, one fertile, another of bare rocks, and a third with streams flowing to the Volta and Niger rivers and including the Atakora range. The E section is a plain. Subsistence agriculture is the economic base. Palm products and cotton account for half of export revenues. People The leading class in Benin is composed of male-line descendants of the Aja Fons, or Dahomey who had established the early kingdom. Trained for civil service by the French, they are the best educated; literacy is 25% among school-age children. In the N are the nomadic Fulani and the Somba tribe, hunters with no political organization; E are Baribas. 90% of the population is rural, and 65% practices animist religion. French is the common language. Government Benin has been under military rule since 1970. The constitution of 1977 instituted a national assembly, whose members belong to the sole legal political party, the Benin People"s Revolutionary Party. History Benin"s history dates back to three principalities-Allada, Porto-Novo, and Dahomey-in the S area who were being pushed by the N Kingdom of Abomey in the 16th century. Dahomey was the most aggressive, pushing N and selling slaves. In 1863 the king of Porto-Novo sought French protection. By 1892 France had subjugated all groups and made them protectorates as part of French West Africa. In 1960 the country became independent as Dahomey. The official name was changed to Benin in 1976. Economic and regional rivalries have caused numerous military coup d""štats and changes of government since 1960. The Marxist-Leninist military government in power since 1972, led by Brig. Gen. Mathieu Kerekou, relaxed its authority somewhat during the late 1970s and improved relations with France. Benin became the center of an international environmental controversy in 1988 when it became known that European nations planned to dump toxic wastes there. Profile Official name: People"s Republic of Benin Area: 43,483sq mi 112,621sq km Population: 4,663,832 Density: 107.3per sq mi 41.4per sq km Chief cities: Porto-Novo capital; Cotonou Government: Military Religion: Animist, Christian, and Moslem Muslim Language: Frenchofficial Monetary unit: CFA franc Gross domestic product: $1,400,000,000 Per capita income: $340 Industries: food processing, including beer, palm oil Agriculture: peanuts, cotton, coffee, tobacco Minerals: petroleum Trading partners: France major, other members of European Common Market, franc zone countries   

Benin, independent nation of W Africa, formerly called Dahomey. Once a French protectorate, it is a country of 40 ethnic tribal groups and a low-level economy. Land and Economy Located in the bulge on the S side of W Africa, Benin is bordered by Nigeria, Toga, Berkina Faso, and Niger,...

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Roger Gibbons asked in his writing...Roger Gibbons asked in his writing "Canada Without Quebec: Thinking Through the Unthinkable"1 ""¦could Canada survive without Quebec?" CWQ pg. 116 Not only is this a question that is not easily answered, but one that can be brought to an even more straightforward question. Can North America remain the same without Quebec belonging to Canada? To imagine Canada without Quebec is like watching the news with no sporting event highlights, a possibility but unlikely to say the least. A Quebec departure from Canada will not only reshape Canada, but will also reshape the entire continent of North America. As the two governments of Quebec and Canada continue to talk about separation, they hold decisively the future of North America. Quebec leaving Canada will open doors for new nations to be built and for other current nations, such as the United States, to consume Canada that is lost in pandemonium. When or if Canada should lose Quebec, those remaining outside of Quebec would be lost in their Canadian distinctiveness and Canadian foundation of life. Canada's uniqueness is one of multiculturalism, bilingualism, rights and freedoms, and well being for all. With the departure of Quebec, Canada loses one of its strongest identities. Canada is known as a French speaking country and an English speaking country; Canada would lose their whole French language characteristics. However, don't think that a language forms a complete identity, for it doesn't, but it does give a sense of belonging and historical background. As stated before, Quebec leaving Canada will form a new nation on the North American Continent. This formation being the most important, for it will allow the others to follow. As soon as Quebec is granted or achieves separation, the James Bay Cree will be the first to follow. The Cree argue that Quebec separating from Canada should allow the Cree from separating from Quebec, much to Quebec's chagrin. Matthew Coon Come wrote in "Dishonourable Conduct: The Crown in Right of Canada and Quebec, and the James Bay Cree"2, "we Crees feel that our rights and interests will be best protected if we remain within Canada"¦" DC pg. 98 Though this would no longer be relevant after Quebec's departure. Come did say this however, "how can people who claim these rights deny these rights to us? Where is the logic?" DC pg. 91 This referring to Quebec's stand that the James Bay Cree have no need or right to separate from Quebec. Though this will be a much-debated problem for years to come, the logic will never come around, and the James Bay Cree will separate from Quebec, creating the second new nation in North America. So now with the French Canadians content, and the James Bay Cree content, what about the rest of the Canadians that are lost in all the disorder? The United States will be one of the first to take advantage of Canada's' misery. Roger Gibbons points out "the absorption of Canada would be with interest to Americans." CWQ pg. 106 Why wouldn't the United States want to expand their boundaries and power of North America and the World? The US would be keen on gaining more territory, especially the fertile land that would boost the American economy. Not only that but having an American soil gateway to Alaska would prove to be very beneficial. The United States main prize would be in gathering the two great cities of Toronto and Vancouver, the two most Canadian cities that resemble an American city. Not just for the fact that these accommodate two or did accommodate two of the Americans National Basketball Associations NBA teams, but the economic advance of these cities would certainty enhance the American economy. Though this sounds easy and simple to expand the American border to gain a few ports, cities and gateways, the border around the new land itself would be of disarray and create lots of turmoil. Gibbons explains how the American absorption would pan out, "picking off provinces or even regions one at a time would make no sense for the United States. It would require a series of institutional accommodations"¦Canada will be absorbed holus-bolus or not at all." CWQ pg. 107 Now what was formerly known as Canada, is an expanded United States, and two new nations of Quebec and the James Bay Cree, with a lost and utterly confused Canadian remain. Canada now remains a small, weak, and struggling nation, but one that is surrounded by allies. The remains of Canada would be ones that are still strong on multiculturalism and the Canadian way of life. Those Canadians that fit in none of the new nations and forbid to be consumed by the US, remain in what is a small nation, most likely located in north Alberta, Saskatchewan, the Northwest Territories and Manitoba. This remaining country would become as Gibbons suggests, "a new set of political institutions that would be much closer to the American model than to Canadian parliamentary tradition." CWQ pg. 113 So now North America stands as a reshaped continent, one with two new nations and one that has become even stronger and one that is much smaller and still recovering from the departure of Quebec.   

Roger Gibbons asked in his writing "Canada Without Quebec: Thinking Through the Unthinkable"1 "…could Canada survive without Quebec?" CWQ pg. 116 Not only is this a question that is not easily answered, but one that can be brought to an even more straightforward question. Can North America remain the same...

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