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A Pair of Tickets by Amy Tan
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Amy Tan is an author who uses the theme of Chinese-American life, focusing mainly on mother-daughter relationships, where the mother is an immigrant from China and the daughter is a thoroughly Americanized --yellow on the surface and white underneath. In her book, the mother tries to convey their rich history and legacy to her daughter, who is almost completely ignorant of their heritage, while the daughter attempts to understand her hopelessly old- fashioned mother, who now seems to harbor a secret wisdom, who, in the end, is right about everything all along. At the opening of the story "A Pair...
do not always understand, like Jandale people do not always want to believe their past and the past of their families. When coming to an understanding of their past, people can lay to rest their urging thoughts and can come in closer contact to their present life. Now that Jandale has meet her sisters, she can now make peace in her life knowing that she has fulfilled her dreams and the dreams of her mother. She can now lay to rest the thought of her mother never seeing her twin daughters again and continue on with her existing life.
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Futility by Wilfred Owen Wilfred Owen...Futility by Wilfred Owen Wilfred Owen is arguably one of the most famous poets of World War One. In his well known sonnet 'futility' he uses powerful techniques such as personification, metaphors and par-rhyme reinforced with powerful imagery to demonstrate the harshness of war. This can also be seen through the tone which changes from hope in the first verse to a profound despair in the second verse. This then causes Owen to question the pointlessness of war. In contrast to his other poems which convey images of horror and violence, in futility he focuses more on the theme of grief. The title of the poem acquires layers of meaning as the poem develops. At first, it is the obvious futility of the personas faith that his friend can be revived "if anything might rouse him now The kind old sun will know" The personification of the sun is later picked up when futility refers to the creation of man. ""O what made fatuous sunbeams toil" This is later explored in the second stanza "“ ""was it for this the clay grew tall?" The form of the poem is very significant; The rhythm in the first verse is irregular. This is greatly achieved by the use of para-rhyme. "Snow/now/know" This effectively describes his uncertainty of the life of the comrade and the suns power. As the poem progresses and conclusions are being reached the rhythm becomes more controlled. In the last two lines where bitterness overcomes grief, he uses para "“ rhyme again to evoke the pointlessness of war. "tall" "all". In the first verse, Owen creates a very hopeful but gentle sorrowful tone. This is effectively achieved by his use of diction by using words such as "gently" and "whispering". The opening line of the poem also contributes to the soft tone "move him into the sun" Although this is a command, it is followed by the word "gently" which gives the reader the impression that there is a sense of sorrow involved in this soldiers death. In contrast to this, the second verse moves on to a more bitter and futile tone . Again this can be seen through the persona of the sun "fatuous sunbeams" The diction also changes in verse two. The repetition of hard consonants "Woke" "wakes" also adds emphasis to the change in tone.. Throughout the poem, Owen uses the persona of the sun to express the harshness and pointlessness of war. In the first verse he puts all his faith into the sun to "rouse" the soldier. "Gently its touch awoke him once" This suggests that before the war and at home the sun always awoke the comrade therefore there is hope that it will awake him now. In the second stanza he begins to lose faith in the sun. This is later picked up with the use of a powerful metaphor "clay grew tall?" The connotations in "clay" evoke a deeper understanding into Owens resentfulness of the sun. The first connotation is simply the earth contains seeds. Then this reference is extended to the earth as a whole and then finally down to the dead comrades life. Another profound metaphor which contributes to the sadness of the situation is "fields unsown". This has the literal meaning of that the comrade will never complete his life working on the farm and the metaphorical meaning suggests the wider tragedy that the comrade has so much of life yet unfulfilled. It appears that the sun has always been able to spark life and creation but is unable to awake the comrade now. "are limbs, so dear-achieved, are sides, Full nerved "“ still warm "“ too hard to stir?" It is here, Owen questions the pointlessness of war and creation itself. The use of powerful techniques throughout the poem evokes a strong understanding of Owens inner thoughts and feelings about the creation of life. .From the title to his extensive use of personification and metaphorical terms it vividly communicates the sense of tragedy and despair. Metaphorically, this poem acquires layers of meaning which together with the persona of the sun and the change in tone between the stanzas the reader can relate to Owens bitterness and despair and therefore can question the pointlessness of war which then reinforces the theme of grief.   

Futility by Wilfred Owen Wilfred Owen is arguably one of the most famous poets of World War One. In his well known sonnet 'futility' he uses powerful techniques such as personification, metaphors and par-rhyme reinforced with powerful imagery to demonstrate the harshness of war. This can also be seen through...

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The Shakespearean tragedy of Macbeth is...The Shakespearean tragedy of Macbeth is one of the shortest of all his plays. The story of one man"s determination to secure his position as king has become a literary classic around the world. Many critics have applied their input on what they believe to be the proper analysis of Macbeth. However Phyllis Rackin"s interpretation of the play has become the counter balance to which I place my critique. Rackin"s criticism of Macbeth employs both the importance of time and the overwhelming power of evil; these ideas are only two of the many themes displayed in Shakespeare"s illustrious tragedy. Rackin analyzed that time was a major factor in Macbeth and all his actions were a "race against time"108. She also noticed that Shakespeare started his play with a question about time, "When shall we three meet again"¦?"Act I, scene I. Rackin viewed Macbeth"s reign at king as a pause in time, at which moment the sun ceases to rise and darkness engulfs Scotland. At the death of Macbeth and the end of his sovereignty, Macduff pronounces, "time is free"Act V, scene VIII. The issue of time has been strongly supported by Phyllis Rackin, however I view this issue as an insignificant matter in the story of Macbeth. Time is an issue in all plays and would function the same in any other suspenseful thriller. Along with time, Phyllis Rackin critiqued the use of the compelling manipulation of evil. In Macbeth, the main character becomes enraged with an evil urge to maintain his status as king. Macbeth"s cravings begin when he is no longer capable of waiting for the witches" prophesies to come true and murders the king. He continues he rampage with the murders of Banquo and Maduff"s intermediate family. This can all be foreseen after Macbeth kills Duncan and cries out that "the deed will not be "done when "tis done," that it will be no "end-all" but instead a beginning"113. Unlike Rackin"s view on time, I agree with her view on Macbeth"s evil entrapment. It is apparent that, throughout the progression of the tragedy, Macbeth transforms from the loyal thane into the murderous king. With enticing issues like the limitation of time and the possessive power"s of evil, the theme of Shakespeare"s Macbeth has become a literary masterpiece. The views of Phyllis Rackin and I are neither true nor false, but are simply a literary analysis of what we believed to be the authors point of view when he composed his work. Numerous critics have picked apart Shakespeare"s Macbeth, all expressing their views on the play. However, it is a writer"s job to write and a critic"s job to critique.   

The Shakespearean tragedy of Macbeth is one of the shortest of all his plays. The story of one man"s determination to secure his position as king has become a literary classic around the world. Many critics have applied their input on what they believe to be the proper analysis of...

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