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A Pair of Tickets by Amy Tan
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Amy Tan is an author who uses the theme of Chinese-American life, focusing mainly on mother-daughter relationships, where the mother is an immigrant from China and the daughter is a thoroughly Americanized --yellow on the surface and white underneath. In her book, the mother tries to convey their rich history and legacy to her daughter, who is almost completely ignorant of their heritage, while the daughter attempts to understand her hopelessly old- fashioned mother, who now seems to harbor a secret wisdom, who, in the end, is right about everything all along. At the opening of the story "A Pair...
do not always understand, like Jandale people do not always want to believe their past and the past of their families. When coming to an understanding of their past, people can lay to rest their urging thoughts and can come in closer contact to their present life. Now that Jandale has meet her sisters, she can now make peace in her life knowing that she has fulfilled her dreams and the dreams of her mother. She can now lay to rest the thought of her mother never seeing her twin daughters again and continue on with her existing life.
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As people grow in life, they...As people grow in life, they mature and change. In the novel , To Kill a Mockingbird ,by Harper Lee, Scout, the main character, matures as the book continues. Slowly but surely, Scout learns to control her explosive temper, to refrain from fistfights, and to respect Calpurnia, their maid, and to really learn her value to the family. Scout simply changes because she matures, and she also changes because Atticus, her father, asks her to. In the early chapters of the book, Scout picks fights at the slightest provocation. One example of this is when Scout beats up Walter Cunningham, one of her classmates, for "not having his lunch", which isn't a very good reason at all. "Catching Walter Cunningham in the schoolyard gave me some pleasure, but when I was rubbing his nose in the dirt Jem came by and told me to stop. 'You're bigger'n he is,' he said "¦ 'He made me start off on the wrong foot.' "¦ 'Let him go Scout. Why?' 'He didn't have any lunch,' I said, and explained my involvement in Walter's dietary affairs" 27. Scout is also very mischievous and has a devious mentality towards Calpurnia. She describes Calpurnia as a tyrannical presence, and she does everything she can to get her out of the house. One time Scout does this is when Walter comes over to her house to eat dinner. Scout criticizes Walter for drowning his food in molasses, and Calpurnia scolds Scout. After Walter leaves, Scout asks Atticus to fire Calpurnia, which of course he doesn't do. "Jem said suddenly grinned at him. 'Come on home to dinner with us, Walter,' he said. "¦ Walter stood where he was, biting his lip. Jem and I gave up, and we were nearly to the Radley Place when Walter called, 'Hey, I'm comin'!' While Walter piled food on his plate, he and Atticus talked together like to men, to the wonderment of Jem and me. Atticus was expounding on farm problems when Walter interrupted to ask if there was any molasses in the house"¦ Walter poured syrup on his vegetables and meat with a generous hand. He would probably have poured it into his milk glass had I not asked what the sam hill he was doing"¦ It was then that Calpurnia quested my presence in the kitchen"¦ She was furious, and when she was furious Calpurnia's grammar became erratic"¦ "There's some folks who don't eat like us," she whispered fiercely"¦ Jem and Walter returned to school ahead of me: staying behind to advise Atticus of Calpurnia's iniquities was worth a solitary sprint past the Radley Place. 'She likes Jem better'n she likes me, anyway,' I concluded, and suggested that Atticus lose no time in packing her off. .. 'Have you ever considered that Jem doesn't worry her half as much?' Atticus's voice was flinty. 'I've no intention of getting rid of her, now or ever'" 27-30. Later in the book, however, Scout changes. She now tries to control her temper, and is somewhat successful. One example of this is when Cecil Jacobs, another of Scout's classmates, insults Atticus by saying that Atticus defended Niggers. Scout remembers that she shouldn't fight, and walks away. "Cecil Jacobs made me forget. He had announced in the schoolyard the day before that Scout Finch's daddy defended niggers"¦ 'You gonna take that back boy?' 'You gotta make me first!' he yelled"¦ 'I drew a bead on him, remembered what Atticus had said, then dropped my fists and walked away, 'Scout's a cow-ward!' ringing in my ears" 80-81. Scout also learns to respect and value Calpurnia.   

As people grow in life, they mature and change. In the novel , To Kill a Mockingbird ,by Harper Lee, Scout, the main character, matures as the book continues. Slowly but surely, Scout learns to control her explosive temper, to refrain from fistfights, and to respect Calpurnia, their maid, and...

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Ralph, the athletic, charismatic protagonist of...Ralph, the athletic, charismatic protagonist of Lord of the Flies, represents the struggle for order and democracy in society. Golding describes Ralph as tall for his age and handsome, and he seems to preside over the other boys by a natural sense of authority. He is "old enough, twelve years and a few months, to have lost the prominent tummy of childhood". He has fair hair and is thin. Golding writes: You could see now that he might make a boxer, as far as width and heaviness of shoulders went, but there was a mildness about his mouth and eyes that proclaimed no devil. p. 10-11 Described as being "big enough to be a link with the adult world of authority," he is elected the leader of the boys at the beginning of the novel. While most of the other boys are concerned with playing, having fun, and avoiding work at the beginning of the story, Ralph sets about building huts and thinking of ways to maximize their chances of being rescued. Ralph"s commitment to civilization and morality is very strong, and his primary wish is to be rescued and returned to the society of adults: "The fire is the most important thing on the island. How can we ever be rescued except by luck, if we don't keep a fire going?" A simple statement by Ralph "brings light and happiness" to the assembly of boys: "We want to be rescued, and of course we shall be rescued." For these reasons, Ralph"s power and influence over the other boys are extremely secure at the beginning of the novel. Although Ralph lacks Piggy"s clear intellect, Ralph is calm and rational, with sound judgment and a strong moral sensibility. Golding uses Ralph to represent the perfect human"” someone who is good but not to such a degree that he is not vulnerable to normal human temptations. For much of the novel, Ralph is simply unable to understand why the other boys would give in to base instincts of lust for blood and barbarism. The sight of the hunters chanting and dancing is baffling and distasteful to him; but when Ralph hunts a boar for the first time, he experiences the exhilaration and thrill of violence: "The desire to squeeze and hurt was over-mastering." Despite his susceptibility to the same instinctual influences that affect the other boys, Ralph remains the one character who remains most civilized through the first half of the novel. He is constantly making sensible rules for the boys to follow, and strives to maintain peace on the island. Ralph is the principal representative of order, civilization, and productive leadership. With his attention to justice and equality, he represents the liberal democratic tradition as chief. In Lord of the Flies, Golding uses Ralph's character as a vehicle to symbolize law, organized society, and moral integrity.   

Ralph, the athletic, charismatic protagonist of Lord of the Flies, represents the struggle for order and democracy in society. Golding describes Ralph as tall for his age and handsome, and he seems to preside over the other boys by a natural sense of authority. He is "old enough, twelve years...

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