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A Pair of Tickets by Amy Tan
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Amy Tan is an author who uses the theme of Chinese-American life, focusing mainly on mother-daughter relationships, where the mother is an immigrant from China and the daughter is a thoroughly Americanized --yellow on the surface and white underneath. In her book, the mother tries to convey their rich history and legacy to her daughter, who is almost completely ignorant of their heritage, while the daughter attempts to understand her hopelessly old- fashioned mother, who now seems to harbor a secret wisdom, who, in the end, is right about everything all along. At the opening of the story "A Pair...
do not always understand, like Jandale people do not always want to believe their past and the past of their families. When coming to an understanding of their past, people can lay to rest their urging thoughts and can come in closer contact to their present life. Now that Jandale has meet her sisters, she can now make peace in her life knowing that she has fulfilled her dreams and the dreams of her mother. She can now lay to rest the thought of her mother never seeing her twin daughters again and continue on with her existing life.
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In Fitzgerald"s The Great Gatsby, all...In Fitzgerald"s The Great Gatsby, all the characters are, in one way or another, attempting to achieve a state of happiness in their lives. The main characters are divided into two groups: the rich upper class and the poorer lower class, which struggles to attain a higher position. Though the major players seek only to change their lives for the better, the American Dream is inevitably crushed beneath the harsh reality of life, leaving their lives without meaning or purpose. Tom and Daisy Buchanan, the rich socialite couple, seem to have everything they could possibly desire; however, though their lives are full of material possessions and worldly goods, they are unsatisfied and seek to change. Tom, the arrogant ex-football player, drifts on "forever seeking a little wistfully for the dramatic turbulence of some irrecoverable football game"pg. 10 and reads "deep books with long words in them"pg. 17 in order to have something to talk about. Though he appears happily married to Daisy, Tom has an affair with Myrtle Wilson and keeps an apartment with her in New York. Tom"s basic nature of unrest prevents him from being satisfied with the life he leads, and so he creates another life for himself with Myrtle. Daisy Buchanan is an empty character, someone with hardly any convictions or desires. Even before her loyalty to either Tom or Gatsby is called into question, Daisy does nothing but sit around all day and wonder what to do with herself and her friend Jordan. She knows that Tom has a mistress on the side, yet she doesn't leave him even when she learns of Gatsby"s love for her. Daisy makes her love to Gatsby apparent, yet cannot bring herself to tell Tom goodbye except when Gatsby forces her too. Even then, once Tom begs her to stay, even then Daisy ultimately leaves Gatsby for a life of comfort and security. The Buchanans are the ultimate examples of wealth and prosperity, and the American Dream. Yet their lives are empty, unfulfilled, and without purpose. Though Myrtle Wilson makes an attempt to escape her own class and pursue happiness with the richer set, her efforts ultimately produce no results and she dies. She is basically a victim of the group she wanted to join. Myrtle tries to join Tom"s class by entering into an affair with him and taking on his way of living, but in doing so she becomes corrupt as if she were rich. Her constant clothing changes signify her dissatisfaction with her life - she changes personalities every time she changes her dress: "with the influence of the dress her whole personality had also undergone a change. The intense vitality"¦ was converted into impressive hauteur"pg. 35. She treats the elevator boy in her apartment building with disdain: "Myrtle raised her eyebrows in despair at the shiftlessness of the lower orders. "These people! You have to keep after them all the time.""pg. 36. . Myrtle strives for a new life for herself, yet she is corrupted by the supposedly "better" group and finally falls victim to it. Gatsby"s idealistic view of Daisy Buchanan is blurred and this becomes apparent when he is confronted by reality. Over the course of five years, Gatsby has built Daisy up in his mind to be the perfect woman, someone that the actual Daisy could be: "no amount of fire or freshness can challenge what a man will store up in his ghostly heart"pg. 101. Daisy cannot help but fall short of Gatsby"s dream, and so Gatsby is disappointed that the woman he loves does not exist as he imagines her to be. Though Gatsby is rich, he is part of the lower rich class , however he attempts to join the upper class with Daisy. He wasnts a better life and he thinks he can do this if he puts his mind to it, which is also a part of the American Dream. However, Gatsby"s dream collapses when he fails to win Daisy and is rejected by the higher social group. All his wealth cannot help him and though he is killed physically by a bullet from old man Wilson"s gun, Gatsby dies spiritually when Daisy chooses Tom over him and the stability that comes with him. The failure of Gatsby"s ideals is directly related to the failure of the American Dream in that it is destroyed by reality, in this case by the reality of Daisy"s rejection. Without his dream, Gatsby has nothing, no fire to keep him going, no direction and no purpose. Throughout the novel, Fitzgerald shows the collapse of dreams, whether they are dreams of money, status, or simply of happiness. The biggest collapse, however, is of the American Dream. The failure of the American Dream is unavoidable, not only because the reality of life cannot compare to idealistic dreams, but also because the ideals are usually far too perfect to be paralleled in reality. Dreams give purpose to life. Without dreams one"s life has no meaning, as shown by Gatsby and the Buchanans. Their lives become empty so very fast. The American Dream is something all people work toward to some extent well I know I do Although it is an admirable goal, it is an unobtainable one. The American Dream is just that, a dream.   

In Fitzgerald"s The Great Gatsby, all the characters are, in one way or another, attempting to achieve a state of happiness in their lives. The main characters are divided into two groups: the rich upper class and the poorer lower class, which struggles to attain a higher position. Though the...

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One of the most famous... One of the most famous soliloquies in the play Macbeth is the "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow"¦" soliloquy. The soliloquy takes place after Macbeth knows that Macduff is going to charge his castle. The last prophecy from the witches is no one born of woman will harm Macbeth. At this moment, Macbeth is not worried that Macduff can harm him because Macduff is born of a woman. Macbeth is getting a little worried though because Macduff's men are approaching Macbeth's castle. He then hears the news that his wife is dead and commences with this famous soliloquy. The soliloquy can be found on page 356 in Act 5, lines 21-30. The first line in the soliloquy is "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time;" This means that time will inconsiderably and slowly go on from day to day and until the end of time. Macbeth has a major reason to say that time will move slowly, because he has just heard the news that his wife is dead and that he has no queen to rule with him. The second line if the soliloquy is "And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death." This means that yesterday has only created fools. Macbeth says this because he was foolish for listening to Lady Macbeth and killing Duncan. He now sees the consequences she has paid for her dirty deed, which were sleepwalking and now death. The third line in this soliloquy is probably the most famous which is "Out, Out, brief candle!" This is Macbeth showing that his candle, Lady Macbeth, has been blown out. At this moment, there is a sense of emptiness inside of Macbeth because his wife has died. The next line says, "Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage And then is heard no more." This is showing that real life is like a play. This shows that a person's life is like an actor's role in a play because after a person dies, you do not hear from them anymore. This is just like when a play is over, you do not hear from the actor again, because the actor's job has ended. The last line of the soliloquy is "It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury Signifying nothing." This means that a person is foolish by getting ahead by wrong means, which in the end does not grant them any satisfaction. This flashes back to when Lady Macbeth says, "Where our desire is got without content, 'Tis safer to be that which we destroy Than be destruction dwell in doubtful joy. Act 3, Scene 2, Lines 5-7." She is unhappy with herself in this passage because she had just been crowned queen but she is not happy with this because the guilt of plotting the murder of Duncan is weighing on her mind. Lady Macbeth has now paid for the murder of Duncan with her own agony and life. The soliloquy is filled with many emotions such as lethargy, hatred, bitterness, despair, weariness, and hopelessness. All of these emotions come through in this soliloquy because it is a time of immense pressure for Macbeth because his wife has just died and his castle is going to be charged upon. He is lethargic toward time because it is going to move so slow to him because his wife is dead. He has hatred and bitterness toward himself because he is the one who murdered Duncan. He has despair, weariness, and hopelessness toward life in general because his wife is dead and his castle is going to be marched upon. This soliloquy is very important to the play because it is Macbeth's last soliloquy and it sums up his life and life in general. It helps to show his decline in emotions and a decline in the way he feels toward what is going on his life, because his wife has died and his castle is being taken from him.   

One of the most famous soliloquies in the play Macbeth is the "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow…" soliloquy. The soliloquy takes place after Macbeth knows that Macduff is going to charge his castle. The last prophecy from the witches is no one born of woman will harm Macbeth. At...

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Life in Stamps, Alabama is very...Life in Stamps, Alabama is very difficult and callous for the Negro people. The Negroes must work long hours at ridiculously low pay just to survive, and often it just was not enough. Angelou explains in the early chapters of I know why the caged bird Sings, just how hard life in Stamps is and how her people are able cope. Angelou conveys this so that the reader will have a greater understanding of what the times she lived in were like; she is also trying to teach us about the circumstances in which her people worked and the spirit that they demonstrated. By describing this, Angelou further enhances the flow of her plot, helping the reader to realize just how oppressed and hopeless life was for the Negro people. Also, Angelou's recollection of the 'common workday' contributes to the tone of soft subtleness set in the early chapters, of the small community of Stamps. There are many different devices that Angelou uses to communicate her message. Angelou uses figurative language to bring the reader to further understand the point she is trying to make. Angelou has strong use of onomatopoeia, at the beginning of the annotated passage, she wrote "The lamplight in the store gave a soft make believe feeling to our world which made me want to whisper..." By saying that she wanted to 'whisper' she further expresses that the delicate light given off by the lamplight is subtle and with the use of the word whisper and because of the way that is pronounced, the word 'whisper' was used very effectively in this sentence. Another example is in the paragraph that states "The sound of the new morning had been replaced with grumbles"¦" the use of the word 'grumbles' is very effective because it gives the reader a sense of the discontentment that the cotton pickers experienced at the end of the day. Also, the most powerful use of onomatopoeia is at the end when Angelou wrote, "I winced to picture them sewing the coarse material"¦" The fact that she winced definitely makes the reader realize the determination and pain the Negroes went through just to make something of themselves. Angelou uses powerful diction, her choice of words is strong and the way they are used proves very effective in grabbing the reader's interest. Angelou stated "In those tender mornings the Store"¦" The use of the word tender is very fitting because of the emphasis on the lamplight being gentle and soft, by saying 'tender mornings' Angelou further adds to the effect of the subtlety of Stamps in the morning. Also, She writes, "the murmurs of waking people were sliced by the cash register as we rang up the five-cent sales." Angelou's use of the word 'sliced' proved effective because it not soft and subtle like the rest of the passage, it causes the reader to notice a change in surroundings from a quiet scene being drastically interrupted by the noise of a cash register. A very strong example of diction was found when the workers were done their working day and went back to the store "and fold down, dirt disappointed, to the ground." This phrase was the most effective, not only were the cotton pickers defeated but they were also dead tired. The transition Angelou made from being up right, to folding down straight to the ground provides the reader with a greater feeling of disappointment and sympathy for the Negro cotton pickers. Angelou expresses her feelings in an exceptional way. Her use of the literary language is well organized and well thought out; with her constant usage of devices, especially figurative language and diction. Rather than this passage being filled with similes and metaphors and other obvious figurative language devices, Angelou embeds words and composes phrases that communicate her message in a quiet subtle way. Angelou's diction is also very effective, her usage of powerful adjectives aid the reader in understanding the passage and the conditions in Stamps. In closing, this passage is written almost like a waltz, it flows smoothly and begins and ends on the same note. The feeling of the passage is one of calmness and mellowness, which are usually associated with the morning, when the sun rises and a new day begins. Philosophically speaking, the lamplight in itself is a metaphor for the sun; it slowly rises or gets brighter, and then begins to set or dim.   

Life in Stamps, Alabama is very difficult and callous for the Negro people. The Negroes must work long hours at ridiculously low pay just to survive, and often it just was not enough. Angelou explains in the early chapters of I know why the caged bird Sings, just how hard...

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