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Analysis of Sonnet 2
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In Sonnet 2, Shakespeare stresses to his lover that beauty will not last, and that it is selfish and foolish for anyone not to prepare for the loss of beauty and youth by having a child to carry on unsurpassed beauty. The sonnet can be cynically seen as Shakespeare"s attempt to get his lover to sleep with him rather than as a lesson in living life. In the first quatrain Shakespeare says that later on, your youth will be worthless. The greatness of your youth, admired by everyone now, will be, will be as worthless as a "tatter"d weed of...
be used but could not be. Shakespeare says, "How much more praise deserved thy beauty"s use" which regrets, if only your beauty could have been put to a greater use.

The couplet then describes what it would be like to have this baby. Shakespeare poetically states that this baby would be "new made when thou art old" This means that the baby would be young while you are old. The final line tells how you would see your own blood flow warm through the baby while you are cold. "And see thy warm blood when thou feel"st it cold."

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In his "American Buffalo," Mamet is...In his "American Buffalo," Mamet is quite critical to the immoralities of the American society, especially those which are caused by business deviation. Such is obviously reflected in the themes, where the theme of business is the central theme of the play. Business in America is still controlled by the myth of the "American Dream." Thus, the American citizen is shown to be badly affected by the concept of "strive and succeed," and a victim of the capitalist materialistic world of business in America, which is mainly built on exploitation and opportunism. The characters of the play, Don, Teach and Bob, aim at success which merely means to them to become wealthy and dominant. Such is revealed in a conversation between Don and Bob, where Don is talking about Fletcher, who is a successful business man from his point of view: "You take him and you put him down in some strange town with just a nickel in his pocket, and by night fall he"ll have that town by the balls. This is not talk, Bob, this is action." The qualifications of success in business are thought by Don to be just common sense, experience and talent: "That"s all business is"¦ common sense, experience and talent." Ethics, indeed, have no value in the corrupt world of business. This is quite manifest in "American Buffalo," where the characters plan for a robbery of a man, who has recently bought a buffalo-headed nickel from Don. At first, Don asks Bob to watch the man, and he blames Bob for not watching him well. Afterwards, Bob lies to Don telling him that he has seen the man; they both agree to break into his house, thinking that the man has a big collection of coins there. However, Teach intervenes and convinces Don to carry out the robbery in stead of Bob, whom he thinks is inexperienced enough to do the job efficiently. The theft does not work out. Both Don and Teach suspect that Bob has carried out the theft behind their backs. At last, they discover that Bob has been lying to them all along. The world of business, in "American Buffalo," is characterized by toughness. Obscene words and expressions, which are verbalized by the characters, are good evidence of that. Teach, as a character, is also a good proof of that; he says: "I am a business man, I am here to do business, I am here to face facts." In addition, Don and Teach are ready to reach their goal by any means, even by violence. This is revealed when Teach savagely hits Bob on his head with a junk piece. This is also revealed through his own words: "They treat me like an asshole, they are an asshole"¦ The only way to teach them is to kill them." And he says: "Guys like that I like to fuck their wives." Accordingly, many elevated sentiments have no place in that kind of world. Even friendship seems to be completely excluded from this world. Teach says that friendship is a nice thing but business is still business. Don also reminds Bob of that fact: "... that"s what business is "¦there"s business, and there"s friendship ..." The characters of "American Buffalo" mainly regard business, in America, as a free enterprise, and such is the very essence of the fake American dream. In other words, every one has the right to make a living and build his own fortune by any possible means. Teach thinks that America is founded on this concept: "To Embark on Any Fucking Course that he sees fit"¦ In order to secure his own chance to make a profit"¦ The country"s founded on this, Don. You know this." Thus, the world of business in America is like a jungle. The only law that governs that jungle is "survival for the fittest". Business simply sucks the blood of the people in America but they usually come to that fact very late. However, when they realize the truth about that world, desperation, bitterness and insecurity become the following predators that feed on what is left of them. Teach"s following words are a great proof of that: The Whole Entire World. There Is No Law. There Is No Right And Wrong. There Is No Friendship. Every Fucking Thing.   

In his "American Buffalo," Mamet is quite critical to the immoralities of the American society, especially those which are caused by business deviation. Such is obviously reflected in the themes, where the theme of business is the central theme of the play. Business in America is still controlled by the...

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In Arthur Miller's essay about "Tragedy...In Arthur Miller's essay about "Tragedy and the Common Man," he argues that the common man is as appropriate a subject for tragedy as the very highly placed kings and noble men. Mankind keeps tragedy above all forms because they are given the same mental abilities as the nobles. In "Death of a Salesman", Willy Loman is a common man and a middle class worker, enough saving to provide food for his family. So if the tragic hero can be a common man, does Willy fit in that category? Even though he is a common man he fails to live up to the standards of being a tragic hero because he never accepts or admits to his own errors. He, therefore, loses his dignity. One of his biggest errors is his failure of be a good father. And does not hold a rightful position in his family. Willy Loman's character is capable of making errors. He believes he is a very successful salesman and well liked. He also thinks that the company likes what he is doing. He once said, "I'm the New England man. I am vital in New England" Miller pg. 32 Because of his false belief about his success Howard fired him. After he got fired charley offered him a job, but he refuses to accept, because he is too proud and jealous to work for Charley. His actions were wrong because at no time was a successful salesman. He is not a powerful character. Willy lives in his fantasies where he is the man. Who goes out to another place and comes out rich, he is love by everyone and admired by his family. In real life, he is lazy and does not live up to his own ideals. "As Aristotle explains, a tragic hero must be one of noble character and must fall from power and happiness."Www.ccd.rightchoice.org/lit115/poetics.html but Willy neither has a noble characteristic nor does he fall from power because he does not have a position of power. According to Miller, a tragic hero is someone who dies for personal dignity. Willy does die for his dignity. "Those who act against the scheme of things that degrades them."Miller. Tragedy of the Common Man Willy, in his ideas and action of committing suicide, fits in that category. In act 2, Willy reveals his desires to win back Biff's respect by committing suicide. During one of his illusions, he says that " Ben that funeral will be massive"¦that boy will be thunderstruck, Ben, because he never realize I am known" Miller pg. 126. In trying to persuade Biff that their father is a great man, Willy will not accept any challenge to his dignity. He refuses to realize that the ideals he set for himself and for Biff are false and that he in fact is not loved by all. When Biff tries to tell him this, he does not listen to his son. If he accepts the idea that he needs to let go of his pride, then he can reach the condition of being informed. He does not concede and accept the consequences, Willy is, therefore, not a tragic hero, only a failure. Willy is not a good father for many reasons. First, he makes his job his first priority. His travels were extensive. He did not have the opportunity to get to know his sons. As a result, he did not love them like a father should. His love for Biff is based on his achievement as an athlete and when Biff loses the scholarship, Willy was so mad that he no longer loved Biff as he once did. Willy wants Biff to be successful like his brother Ben. Furthermore Willy is unable to admit his faults because he has too much pride. In all his mistakes, Willy fails to be a good father. Instead he is crazy selfish failure. Later on, this aspect of his was defined as a failure. By studying the character of Willy Loman carefully it is evident that he is not a tragic hero. He neglects his responsibilities as a father. He is not truthful, and this leads to loss of his pride and dignity. Willy is blinded by his pride that he did not realize the consequences of his actions. Unlike a true tragic hero, Willy does not admits his own errors and his false pride.   

In Arthur Miller's essay about "Tragedy and the Common Man," he argues that the common man is as appropriate a subject for tragedy as the very highly placed kings and noble men. Mankind keeps tragedy above all forms because they are given the same mental abilities as the nobles. In...

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