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Caesar And Brutus
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Brutus was a trusted friend of Caesar and an honorable man, or so you thought. In William Shakespeare"s The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Brutus is presented as a loyal companion to Caesar showing himself as honorable only to turn around and betray his friend by death. This to me does not sound like the act of an honorable man. Can a man who is honored, be honorable? Brutus was a noble man in Rome and a good friend to the leader Caesar. Many looked up to Brutus as an honest man, and a person to trust and confide in. Trust...
person. With so much going for him, he lost it all to an easy way out of a difficult situation. We are all presented with effortless ways to get out of complicated circumstances, but it"s not always the best.

As loyal and trustworthy as Brutus was first thought to be, his true side was eventually shown in the end. He was no friend to Caesar, or anyone else. Betrayal, lies, suicide, and murder were result of a weak and deceitful man. This man showed he was anything but honorable in anyway. On who is honored can"t always be honorable.

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People engage in wars for different...People engage in wars for different reasons. Some for nationalism, many for what is right, and still others do not even know why they fight. In the books, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, and All Quiet On the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque, two different people fight for different causes yet have a common bond. Both Okonkwo and Paul Baumer find their identity through defending the dignity and honor of those around them. Paul is caught in WWI fighting to prove his loyalty to his country. Amidst the war, he struggles to find meaning in the new image he has become. In the beginning, their teacher persuades everyone in the class to enlist in the military to fight the glorious war. Thinking this is an honorable idea, everyone joins, even those who secretly fear the battlefield. However, in certainty, they are forced into volunteering; "Territorial Kantorek, two years ago you preached us into enlisting; and among us there was one, Joseph Behm, who didn't want to enlist. He was killed three months before he would have been called up in the ordinary way. If it had not been for you he would have lived just that much longer" 174. Their schoolmaster, Kantorek fills their heads up with views of nationalism, the belief that one"s country is all that matters. Some students even have pressure from their parents to enlist. Not enlisting is like turning their back on their own country. To the teachers, schoolmasters, and older men, going to war is the best thing a man could do for his country. However, in reality, Paul and his friends do not want to kill or be killed. One of Paul's friend says, "No one in particular wants it, and then all at once there it is. We didn't want the war, the others say the same thing- and yet half the world is in it all the same" 206. The young group of soldiers concludes that they are trapped fighting in war for the desires of generals and rulers wanting fame. Although none of them want to fight, patriotism to one's own country overrules the sense. In combat and fighting in action, Paul, ""¦see[s] how peoples are set against one another, and in silence, unknowingly, foolishly, obediently; innocently slay one another" 263. Baumer, a soldier, merely follows instructions. He has no say, no opinion whatsoever, and whatever ideas he has, is to be kept within him. His allegiance is pledged to his country; therefore he does anything it assigns him to do. Okonkwo battles for the traditional Ibo culture that the tribe of Umuofia has to keep sacred from the dangers of colonization brought by the white men. People, like Okonkwo, depend strongly on the ancestors and gods in their culture. Natives from all over come ""¦ when misfortune dogged their steps or when they had a dispute with their neighbors. They came to discover what the future held for them or to consult the spirits of their departed fathers" 15. Going to the gods of their ancestors is a deeply rooted tradition from which they govern their lives. Yet when the white men come and bring a new government and a new religion, they destroy the cultural balance of faith and religion that encompasses the native people in Africa. The commissioner, ""¦had already chosen the title of the book, after much thought: The Pacification of the Primitives Tribes of the Lower Niger" 171. Okonkwo fights against the unjust government that comes to change their culture. His objective is to get rid of the white men and preserve the good, faithful religion that has taken care of them for a long time. He loves his people, his culture, the peace and trust that exists in the beginning. Similarly, Okonkwo and Paul tragically perish at the end. They both die in the struggle to define themselves because their entire lives were defined for them-- for Paul, through his nation, for Okonkwo, through his heritage. Very few win the battle and find themselves, simply because so many powerful influences are at play in their lives. Everyone struggles, and they all die in the end, but those who make it find peace. "He fell in October 1918, "¦his face had an expression of calm, as though almost glad the end had come" 296. Paul finds peace because he dies learning that his life consists of camaraderie and friendship that only the army could give him. "Then they came to the tree from which Okonkwo's body was dangling, and they stopped dead" 170. Okonkwo gives up the battle and takes his life because he thinks that he can never defeat the forces that devour him and consume his traditional values. However, in essence, he finds himself too, because he realizes that the past makes him what he is. These two characters, Paul and Okonkwo, find themselves different in numerous aspects of their life, but similar as well in many ways at the end.   

People engage in wars for different reasons. Some for nationalism, many for what is right, and still others do not even know why they fight. In the books, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, and All Quiet On the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque, two different people fight for...

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Is Perry A Hero? A hero...Is Perry A Hero? A hero can be defined as a person noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose, especially one who has risked his/her life. Being in a war has made many people hero's, for an example Perry. Perry can be considered a hero because unlike others, Perry willingly went into the war. He also went into a war with a medical history and then in the war ended up saving a fellow soldier's life. The first reason Perry is a hero is because he enlisted in the war while other fled from the draft. First, Perry is a courageous man for entering the war. At this particular period in time, some people did everything they could to avoid going into the war. One way people could avoid the war was to flee to Canada. Brew admits to thinking about this by saying to Perry, "I almost went to Canada when I got notice to go down and register"¦"¦but I didn't have the nerve"P. 147. Another way people fled the war was by burning their draft cards that they have received. Another way Perry is a hero is that even though he had a medical condition, he still wanted to join the army. Second of all, Perry is a hero because even though he had a medical condition, he stilled enlisted in the army. Some people back in America didn't even want to go to Vietnam, Perry did it with a hurt leg. This leg injury kept Perry from what he really wanted in getting training in a helicopter, so he decided to do the next best thing. Perry is not legally allowed to join the army in Vietnam but the paperwork on him is backed up so no one will know until later. We learn that the paperwork has been at camp for a while because at the end of the book a doctor says to Perry, "It was here since, oh yes, the eight of March. I guess it was late. You're going to be sent home."P. 305. The last reason as to why Perry is a hero is because he saved a man's life by risking his own. Lastly, Perry is considered a hero because of saving a man's life. Perry and Peewee were walking back to the extraction point when they saw Monaco being held captive by Congs who were fifty feet away in some bushes. Perry and Peewee recognized that the Congs were waiting for a helicopter to come pick Monaco up and at that point the Congs would attack. Risking death upon their already beaten bodies, Perry and Peewee attacked the Congs using the element of surprise. They managed to rescue Monaco and get back to base safely. Monaco shows his appreciation by saying to Perry at the hospital, "No, I was dead. I was actually sitting there with that Cong gun right on my ass and I was dead. You know, when it went down, when you and Peewee opened up on the gun, it was like I was brought back to life. I was dead and I was brought back to life again."P. 300 Perry, along with many others, has been made into a war hero by fighting in the Vietnam War. The first way Perry was a hero was by enlisting in the war while many others fled the country to escape the draft. Also, Perry is a hero by joining the army in Vietnam despite his medical condition with his leg. Finally, the last way Perry was a hero was by saving a fellow soldier's life Monaco while risking his own at the same time. Hopefully, soldiers in all wars can be as courageous and heroic as Perry was.   

Is Perry A Hero? A hero can be defined as a person noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose, especially one who has risked his/her life. Being in a war has made many people hero's, for an example Perry. Perry can be considered a hero because unlike others,...

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To fully understand an author's central...To fully understand an author's central theme, one must appreciate the symbols he uses and what the symbols represent. The symbols used by Nobel Prize winning author William Golding, in his novel Lord of the Flies, illustrates this need for comprehension. The characters in this novel, a group of school aged British boys, are stranded on a tropical utopia. Ralph, who is the chosen chief, tries to keep a sense of civilization alive with rules and responsibility; Piggy aids Ralph by being the voice of reason and knowledge. A split between the boys leads to Jack taking control and creating his immoral and reckless tribe. The boys' regression from a civilized society to savagery is symbolized by the use of Piggy's glasses, the fire and the importance of the conch. Firstly, the glasses, worn by Piggy represent intelligence and technology. The boys use "his specs-"¦as burning glasses" Golding 41. They use their intuitiveness and teamwork to make the fire that would later aid in their rescue and are very concerned with starting the fire and keeping it going. But, in no time the state of the glasses begin to deteriorate because of a clash between Jack and Piggy when "Jack smacked Piggy's head"¦and Piggy's glasses flew off and tinkled on the rocks" Golding 75. One side of Piggy's glasses are broken; this shows the boys lack of compassion because they do not care if Piggy can see. Furthermore, when Jack and his tribe take control one night "they came, stealing"¦at night, in darkness, and stole"¦" Golding 188. The boys have finally crossed the line, like thieves they stole Piggy's glasses not caring that they blinded him. The glasses, depreciate in value throughout the novel. They go from being intact and representing good judgment, to being half-intact to their total devastation when they are stolen by Jack and his out of control tribe. Subsequently, the fire, in particular, the rescue, fire was of great importance to the boys in the beginning but towards the end it lost all value and was no longer kept as a main priority. In the beginning, the fire was only meant to be used as a rescue signal; the reason for this fire was to "help them to find us the boys. If a ship comes near the island they may not notice us. So we must make smoke on top of the mountain" Golding 37. At this point, the boy's main mission is to get off of the island. Additionally, throughout the novel, the boys begin to care less and less about keeping the fire going. Ralph commented "'Can't they see? Can't they understand? Without the smoke signal we'll die here?'" Golding 153. Ralph is trying to keep the idea alive but the boys are starting to care more about other things and less about keeping the fire going. In addition, Ralph makes a final plea to the boys, mainly Jack, in a fit of fury. He says "'don't you understand? You painted fools? Sam, Eric, Piggy and me-we aren't enough. We tried to keep the fire going, but we couldn't, and then you, playing at hunting"¦'"Golding 197. Ralph's rescue fire task is slowly dying and Jack's hunters could not be bothered with the thought of being rescued. All they want to do is have hunt and have fun. The importance of the fire changes a great deal in the novel. The boys go from wanting to be rescued too not even caring at all. Finally, the use of the conch is of great importance because it establishes rules and gives whomever posses it power. At an assembly Ralph said "'we'll have to have "hands up" like at school"¦then I'll give them the conch"¦'" Golding 31. The boys who chose Ralph as the leader are quite ready to follow the rules of the conch and they respect it. Unfortunately, when the boys moved on to Jack's tribe, the conch began losing the authority it once had. In a conversation with Piggy over Ralph's rank as chief, Ralph said, "If I blow the conch, and they don't come back; then we've had it. We shan't keep the fire going. We'll be like animals. We'll never be rescued." Golding 99. The boys slowly shifted towards Jack's tribe and disregard the only element of order apparent on the island. Finally, when "the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist." When the conch was destroyed, it brought Ralph to a cruel reality. All the boys had become savages and were not the same boys he once knew. The conch was a symbol of authority and order, and as the boys regressed, the conch became less and less important to them. By using these symbols, Golding clearly emphasizes the boy's degeneration from a proper British society to complete savagery. Moreover, Piggy's glasses, which symbolized intelligence and technology, later through their gradual destruction became a symbol of corrupt power. The fire, which was so imperative to the boys' rescue slowly regressed and at the end became a symbol of the old rules. The conch, which once was a symbol of rules and authority, held no meaning at the end besides reminding the boys of how far they drifted from civilization. To conclude, the greater understanding a reader has of the symbols in a novel, the greater the impact of the author's central theme.   

To fully understand an author's central theme, one must appreciate the symbols he uses and what the symbols represent. The symbols used by Nobel Prize winning author William Golding, in his novel Lord of the Flies, illustrates this need for comprehension. The characters in this novel, a group of school...

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