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How language contributes to theme
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Harper Lee uses a variety of language styles to establish the distinct characteristics of the characters she creates. The many forms of diction and dialect used throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird help accentuate the realism of the characters to the reader. The story takes place in a small town in Maycomb county, Alabama, so it's not surprising that siblings, Scout and Jem, and their friend Dill all talk with a southern accent. In a conversation between the three of them in Chapter 1, the southern dialect is quite evident. Jem, who is meeting Dill for the first time...
uses very specific words. He holds a very high place in society with the occupation of a Judge. The reader can sense this when hearing the way he speaks. One would guess that he would have a lot of money, and be looked up to. The reader can make many assumptions of a character just by listening to the way he or she talks.

Dialect and diction help the reader grasp the personalities and traits of the characters. Harper Lee's language usage not only makes the characters come alive, but it makes the characters appear real, and especially believable.

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Oedipus' life is revealed during the...Oedipus' life is revealed during the hours on stage. It is difficult to think of another play in which unity of time as a formal property of the drama contributes more to meaning. Every step Oedipus takes to solve the old murder mystery, every new confrontation with those he summons to appear with pieces of the past, every one of their chance disclosures, brings him closer both to the solution he seeks and to the self discovery he does not foresee. When the last piece falls into place the detective becomes the criminal, his success his doom, his happy ignorance tragic knowledge, and the evil without the evil within. Such a summary description of the plot points to heavy ironic nature. Dramatic irony operates whenever the audience is aware of some circumstance in plot or character that gives meaning beyond or at odds with that which the speaker consciously intends, or changes a situation with the significance unsuspected by the character caught in it. The more hostile the covert significance is to the unwitting ironist and the farther he is from realizing it, the more poignant the irony. Dramatic irony first begins with the appearance of Oedipus in his Kingly robes and with his first words, "I myself come hither, Oedipus, famous among all men". The pitiful towns people have appealed for aid to the one who is in reality the cause of their woe. Teresias is the blind man who sees, Oedipus the seeing man who is blind. Oedipus welcomes the information Creon brought him from Delphi. His optimism, his zeal to carry out all the commands of Apollo and to punish the murderer of Laius is ironical. In Oedipus' words to the citizen supplicant in scene 1 "sick as you are, not one is as sick as I," we hear not just the King's concern for his stricken people and his self-involvement in their fate, we also perceive the dreadful accuracy of himself. Our perception depends on our knowledge of the outcome in the persistent pattern of ironies "“ Oedipus cursing Laios's murderer, promising to avenge the dead king " just as though I were his son", and berating Teirsias for his arrogance, mocking his blindness, and accusing him of complicity in the murder. Far from being inept, premature giveaway of the plot, Sophocles' method engages our interest in the dramatic form as an image of the frailty of man's defenses, the folly of his feeling of security and power "“ hubris is the Greek word "“ and the strange inevitability of his fate. Our suspense concerning the manner in the ironies will complete themselves in the unraveling of the directed past is of a subtler kind than that produced by ignorance of outcome. If we miss the grim geometry in all this, the plot will seem only like a set of brutal facts manipulated for shock effect "“ not so much an irrelevant as an inadequate response. Oedipus even goes further by exhorting them in the search for the murderer of Laios, he proclaims his curse on the murderer with dreadful irony, interdicts him from concourse with Thebans and emphasizes his own zeal in the cause. Irony is a rhetorical device for holding different or opposite truths in suspension, for focusing on the discrepancy between what seems to be and what is. It is therefore properly the sustaining mode of a tragedy of self-ignorance. At the beginning of the play Oedipus has a clear and single purpose: to find Laios 's murderer. When he later begins to pursue his own parentage the obvious irony is that wise and self assured man doesn't' realize that his purpose has changed. The deeper irony is that it hasn't really changed, since the answer to the question of whose son he is also the answer to the question who killed Laios. Pride motivates both quests.   

Oedipus' life is revealed during the hours on stage. It is difficult to think of another play in which unity of time as a formal property of the drama contributes more to meaning. Every step Oedipus takes to solve the old murder mystery, every new confrontation with those he summons...

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Throughout the incident on pages 66-69...Throughout the incident on pages 66-69 in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck fights with two distinct voices. One is siding with society, saying Huck should turn Jim in, and the other is seeing the wrong in turning his friend in, not viewing Jim as a slave. Twain wants the reader to see the moral dilemmas Huck is going through, and what slavery ideology can do to an innocent like Huck. Huck does not consciously think about Jim's impending freedom until Jim himself starts to get excited about the idea. The reader sees Huck's first objection to Jim gaining his freedom on page 66, when Huck says, "Well, I can tell you it made me all over trembly and feverish, too, to hear him, because I begun to get it through my head that he was most free-and who was to blame for it? Why, me. I could get that out of my conscience, no how nor no way." Huck is hearing the voice of society at this point, not his own. He does not see a moral dilemma with Jim being free; he is opposed to the fact that he is the one helping him. This shows Huck misunderstanding of slavery. Huck does not treat Jim like a slave when they travel together, this shows the reader that Huck views Jim as an equal in most ways. Huck sees having a slave only as owning the person, not actually being a slave to someone. Therefore, when he helps Jim runaway it would be like stealing. This conscience is telling him that Miss Watson, Jim's master, never did anything wrong to him and that he shouldn't be doing a wrong to her by helping Jim escape. This is a totally different view of Miss Watson from Huck's perspective. Huck always disliked Miss Watson, but now that this society voice plays a part in Huck's judgment his views are changed. This society views allows Huck to see Jim, a friend, only as a slave and Miss Watson, almost a foe in his young views, as a dear friend. Twain is showing the reader the gross injustices of slavery in this little incident, as well as his moral opposition to slavery. Twain wants the reader to see how slavery ideology changed people, even those who didn't understand it fully. Twain wants the reader to see how unfair slavery was in how it could even change Huck's thinking, whom the reader had never before seen voice ill conceptions about black people. When Huck's mind can be so radically changed to such opposing ideas and morals, the reader sees these horrors plainly and knows Twain's opposition to slavery is right. Twain does not let the reader thing badly of Huck for very long, though, having Huck's true voice shine out by the end of the confrontation. By page 67 Huck is almost loathing to go and turn Jim in, seeing the act as an obligation rather than a moral right. He says, "Well, I just felt sick. But I says, I got to do it-I can't get out of it." Twain wants the reader to see Huck's change in judgment. The reader is able to see Huck's newfound reluctance, brought on by Jim's words of appreciation. These words bring Huck back to the realization that Jim is a friend, not property. And even though Huck still consciously says he must turn in Jim, the reader does not believe he will do it anymore. Huck's confrontation with the slave hunters and his scheme to protect Jim prove the reader correct in his assumption. Huck has now subconsciously decided to protect Jim at all costs. This is the second voice that Jim hears. This voice tells him that, ""¦s'pose you'd a done right and give Jim up; would you felt better than what you do now? Now, says I, I'd feel bad-I'd feel just the same way I do now. Well, then, says I, what's the use you learning to do right, when it's troublesome to do right and ain't no trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same?" Even though these are Huck's thoughts at the end of the incident, the reader knows this was Huck's subconscious battle before he decided to help Jim. Twain wants the reader to see how hard it is to break out of society's ideas, but someone has to be willing to do it. Twain wants the reader to respect Huck's great moral conversion, even if it is hidden behind Huck's lie to do whatever "come handiest at the time" because the reader knows Huck will always choose Jim as "handiest" now. Twain is telling the reader to do what is "handiest" but also to remember whom it affects, friend of foe? Because, above even society's views, should come friends. Twain's morals are clearly shown through this short, but hugely important, passage. I think his morals were bold for his time and I respect him in the highest revere for his braveness at expressing them in a time period when blacks in the south were still very much hated. This fact in itself should spur others on to do something against the grain of society and voice their true opinions. It is a lesson that can be appreciated by all time periods because I know I do.   

Throughout the incident on pages 66-69 in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck fights with two distinct voices. One is siding with society, saying Huck should turn Jim in, and the other is seeing the wrong in turning his friend in, not viewing Jim as a slave. Twain wants the reader...

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