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How language contributes to theme
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Harper Lee uses a variety of language styles to establish the distinct characteristics of the characters she creates. The many forms of diction and dialect used throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird help accentuate the realism of the characters to the reader. The story takes place in a small town in Maycomb county, Alabama, so it's not surprising that siblings, Scout and Jem, and their friend Dill all talk with a southern accent. In a conversation between the three of them in Chapter 1, the southern dialect is quite evident. Jem, who is meeting Dill for the first time...
uses very specific words. He holds a very high place in society with the occupation of a Judge. The reader can sense this when hearing the way he speaks. One would guess that he would have a lot of money, and be looked up to. The reader can make many assumptions of a character just by listening to the way he or she talks.

Dialect and diction help the reader grasp the personalities and traits of the characters. Harper Lee's language usage not only makes the characters come alive, but it makes the characters appear real, and especially believable.

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People who write poetry do so...People who write poetry do so for various reasons. They write to express such things as anger, fear, happiness, and the unknown. Whether it is to have a hobby, do something for leisure time, or to express one's feelings, everyone has their own motive. The later years of Dickinson's life were primarily spent in mourning because of several deaths within the time frame of a few years. Emily's father died in 1874, her nephew Gilbert died in 1883, and both Charles Wadsworth Emily's lover and Emily's mother died in 1882. Over those years, many of the most influential and precious friendships of Emily's passed away, and that gave way to the more concentrated obsession with death in her poetry. As a result of Emily Dickinson's life of solitude, she was able to focus on her world more sharply than other authors of her time "”contemporary authors who had no effect on her writing. Emily was original and innovative in her poetry. Many of her poems were completed and written on scraps of paper, such as old grocery lists. Eventually when her poetry was published, they were grouped into classes"” friends, nature, love, and death. Black Many of Emily Dickinson's poems that were written about death reflect on how she felt about it and how it was an influence in her life. Because death was occurring so often in the life of Emily Dickinson, I have chosen to write about the influence of it in her poetry. Two poems in which have been found, "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" and "The Bustle in a House", can be associated with each other by one of the aforementioned categories: death. In the poem, "Because I Could Not Stop for Death," Dickinson personifies death as a kind person that takes care of people: Because I could not stop for Death- He kindly stopped for me- "¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦ "¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦ We slowly drove- He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure took For His Civility- Dickinson 5-8. She also describes several scenes on her voyage throughout death: We passed the School, where Children Strove At Recess- in the Ring- We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain- We passed the Setting Sun- 9-12. These scenes reveal that Emily Dickinson's attitude towards death is not scary; it is a slow and peaceful process that can be compared to that of passing a group of school children innocently playing at recess or watching the sun set with a loved one. Perhaps her reflection of death in this particular poem was a way for her to cope with the loss of the persons whom she was close with. Dickinson's poem "The Bustle in a House" also centers on the theme of death. This poem may reflect the loss of the people to whom Emily was close to in a different way. Through this poem she conveys losing her loved ones as, "The Sweeping up the Heart / And putting Love away 5-6". Here, Emily wrote about her losses perhaps not to try and cope, but to express how she really felt when a death occurred, like her heart was being stolen and love being taken away from her. Many of the poems written by Emily Dickinson reflect on how she felt about death because it was such an influence in her life. Because she lost close people to her such as her mother, father, nephew, lover, and many friends, Emily took advantage of her talents to write poetry as a way to express her feelings towards death; readers of her poetry can see the influences her life had on what she wrote about. Authors of poetry often write to express such feelings that they have about their life. Whether it is to have a hobby, do something for leisure time, or to express one's feelings, everyone has their own motive.   

People who write poetry do so for various reasons. They write to express such things as anger, fear, happiness, and the unknown. Whether it is to have a hobby, do something for leisure time, or to express one's feelings, everyone has their own motive. The later years of Dickinson's life...

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In the 1960 novel, "To Kill...In the 1960 novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird", Harper Lee explores the concept of racism in the legal system and the upbringing of children. These notions are shown as one of the main patriarchs, Atticus Finch. He shows his children a principled path through life, and through his court case, he reinforces these philosophies. He also shows the small southern town of Maycomb what it really feels like to be a Negro. Atticus did not fail at either of these responsibilities: as a lawyer, he did not fail, and as a father, he didn't fail either. He succeeded what he set out to do, with flying colours, and taught everybody a lesson or two on how to behave. Atticus Finch is a success as a father because he has raised, with the help of Calpurnia, two healthy young children. He has helped them deal with their own emotions, and in turn, helped them stand in another person's shoes. Atticus teaches Scout the narrator how to be more reflective. On page 33 of the novel Atticus says: "First of all," he said, "if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you"ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view "“ until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." In this quote, Atticus is trying to tell Scout to be more reflective in the way she acts. When Jem and Scout have finished reading to Mrs Dubose, and have just found out that she is dead, Atticus tells them what true courage is. Page 124: "I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It"s when you know you"re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do. Mrs Dubose won, all ninety-eight pounds of her. According to her views, she died beholden to nothing and nobody. She was the bravest person I ever knew." Atticus' powerful words helped the children come to terms with the many levels of meaning in the world. He explains that things are not just in black and white, that things can be in many tints and shades. Atticus' lecture helped the children to create a more complete picture of the world surrounding them. Atticus Finch, as well as being a good father, is also an excellent lawyer. Although he lost the Tom Robinson case, he still made a very persuasive speech on the ways of the townspeople. He did the best job he could, and compelled the jury to discuss Tom's fate for over two hours. His influential address is on page 224: "The state has not produced one iota of medical evidence to the effect that the crime Tom Robinson is charged with ever took place. It has relied instead upon the testimony of two witnesses whose evidence has not only been called into serious question on cross-examination, but has been flatly contradicted by the defendant. The defendant is not guilty, but somebody in this courtroom is". These are not the words of a failed lawyer. Again, on page 225, he tells the court: "The witnesses for the state have presented themselves to you gentlemen, to this court, in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted, confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption - the evil assumption - that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral beings, that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption one associates with minds of their calibre. Which, gentlemen, we know is in itself a lie as black as Tom Robinson"s skin, a lie I do not have to point out to you. You know the truth, the truth is this: some Negroes lie, some Negroes are immoral; some Negro men cannot be trusted around women, black or white. But this is a truth that applies to the human race and to no particular race of men." Even his daughter, Scout, thinks that he is trying his hardest on the doomed case. Page 266: "Atticus had used every tool available to free men to save Tom Robinson, but in the secret courts of men"s hearts Atticus had no case. Tom was a dead man the minute Mayella Ewell opened her mouth and screamed." Atticus seriously swayed the town's views and beliefs on Negroes and their role in society. He was respected so much by the town's Negro population that they all stood up when he left the courtroom. This is not the kind of reaction that a failed lawyer would receive. As a father and as a lawyer, Atticus Finch uses similar techniques. He is honest, speaks the whole truth, listens to the response, is confident and uses language very proficiently. When speaking to his children he is warm and friendly; but when speaking to a court, he is very formal and curt, using the truth to his advantage. He tells the jury not to blame Tom Robinson, and he tells the children not to make fun of Arthur Radley in their games. In both situations, Atticus exudes a strong sense of power. He makes the scene his, illustrating the whole picture in very fine detail. Earlier on in the book, Scout is embarrassed of her father because he appears to have no talents. Atticus' talents are more adult, and Scout discovers them first hand as she grows up. Despite Scout's ignorance, his language and public speaking abilities really shine throughout the book. These talents are what make Atticus Finch unique as a parent and as a lawyer. "As you grow older, you"ll see white men cheat black men every day of your life, but let me tell you something and don"t you forget it - whenever a white man does that to a black man, no matter who he is, how rich he is, or how fine a family he comes from, that white man is trash." This quote page 243 is one of the most meaningful in the entire book. It sums up everything the book is trying to teach, and brings the underlying message into the spotlight. Atticus tells both the court and the children that, quite simply, racism is bad and that to kill a mockingbird is a sin. The mockingbirds of this story are Tom Robinson, who did nothing but help Mayella Ewell, and Arthur "Boo" Radley, who did nothing but stay in his house. Page 99: "Mockingbirds don"t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don"t eat up people"s gardens, don"t nest in corncribs, they don"t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That"s why it"s a sin to kill a mockingbird."   

In the 1960 novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird", Harper Lee explores the concept of racism in the legal system and the upbringing of children. These notions are shown as one of the main patriarchs, Atticus Finch. He shows his children a principled path through life, and through his court case,...

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