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Susan Sontag
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Susan Sontag, in "Against Interpretation," takes a very interesting critical standpoint on the idea of literary interpretation. Unlike most literary critics, Sontag believes that literary criticism is growing increasingly destructive towards the very works of art that they, supposedly, so greatly "appreciate" and "respect." Her standpoint could not be more accurate. Reading her work generates numerous questions, the most important of which is quite possibly, "How are we to take her final statement, 'In place of a hermeneutics we need an erotics of art.'" In the light of her previous statements, made throughout the work, one could only see this...
"Yes, Sontag meant to make just such a jab at the modern interpreter." Nevertheless, when adequate thought is applied to the situation one is forced to ask how else she could have more effectively driven home her point.

It is practically necessary to meet someone on their terms first if you hope to convert them to yours. Sontag has done this because she has little other choice. She has so effectively made her point, with the proper amount of respect, that her target, the modern critic, is in no position to resent Sontag's statements without first acknowledging their veracity.

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The effectiveness of the treatment of...The effectiveness of the treatment of burlesques can be seen through two stories namely Henry Fielding's 'Joseph Andrews' and Alexander Pope's 'The Rape of Lock.' These novels are two fine examples of incongruous imitation, the form that imitates the manner form and style and subject matter of a serious work. The serious work for Fielding was Samuel Richardson's novel Shamela and the Greek epics homer, Virgil for Pope. Fielding and Pope's books are from the same school that being satire, but although they are alike in burlesque, the form and story are not. For instance Burlesque used through mock epic poem is distinguished in Pope's story which elaborates the form and the ceremonious style of the epic genre, but applies it to narrate at length the trivial subject matter, that being of Belinda the elegant and frivolous lady whose vanity is cherished. In contrast to this, Fielding's story is a comic epic in prose told through the eyes of a young man named Joseph where the story using burlesque stresses the element of self-discovery through the narrator, the characters say one thing and do another. It is appearance versus reality. Their angle of satire is separated although both of them do connect the fictional world to the world of experience. Furthermore in 'The Rape of Lock', Alexander Pope's view through the grandiose epic perspective is a quarrel between the belles and elegant of the day over the theft of a lady's curl of which the effectiveness of Pope satire comes from this seemingly minor event. The story includes such elements of traditional epic protocol, supernatural machinery, a voyage on a ship, a visit to the under world and a historically scaled battle between the sexes. Whereas Fielding's story is on less of a grandiose scale with only an innocent boy, it has no pomp but a story of how luck and unfortunate circumstance were thrown his way. The burlesque story was constructed as a reaction to and refutation of the ethical system used by Richardson, as shown by Henry Fielding using a unique way of portraying religion in his works. Fielding loves portraying Christianity as violent. Joseph's friend, Parson Adams show his readiness to take part in any fights seconds this. Pope and Fielding's stories are about people's eccentricities where Fielding particularly is presenting moral examples; the reader is playfully frustrated by the narrator's story, but ultimately convinced by the serious ethical intent. Fielding shows us the means of de-mystification; it is an exercise in reflection and self-awareness, to look at the ridiculous of a situation and people. Likewise Pope wants us to recognize that is partly because the main character has been educated and trained to act this way. The society as whole is as much to blame as she is. Pope's phrases are to expose an absurd attention to exhibition of pride and ostentation. Pope and Fielding show the pompousness of people. For example Pope ludicrously overstates the importance of the whole affair, he succeeds, paradoxically enough, in making the whole thing seem ridiculous and funny but also somehow tragic. Similarly Fielding who uses Parson Adams, who looks after Joseph, is shocked to learn that a fellow priest would not lend him any money, which was completely against the tenets of Christianity in regards to helping your brother. Fielding creates more inhospitable Christian characters, which to him seem like the most hypocritical beings. With Fielding you are led where you as a reader have to distinguish the person who pretends out of vanity or from the truly great woman/man. Likewise where Pope is concerned we have the vanity of woman whose pomp and circumstance are to make her a great woman, although both stories make you see the stupidity of it all. Moreover Fielding has the long and arduous task convincing his readers of stature of Joseph or the value for male chastity in general. A lot of us begin a long way from attitudes of Joseph , and Fielding seems to encourage us. His task in rebuilding Joseph into a proper heroic figure is less challenging than that of reconstructing his reader. As much as Fielding is showing male virtue instead we see Pope's misogyny is especially potent when he equates female beauty with deception and dissuasion from ideals, such as religion. In summary Pope makes us aware of the fact that not only the participants in the dram but also the rest of humanity, including Pope himself and certainly his readers, are somehow ridiculous and funny"”and tragic "“ too. Pope uses the literary conventions of epic poetry such as stating of the theme, the invocation of the Muse, the asking of the question, in the middle of things, the introduction or intervention of supernatural beings, the epic catalogue, and the decent of man. Similarly Fielding shows the abuse of power by individual, classes and humanity, also inhumanity of individuals and society. To conclude, the effectiveness of these two great stories of self-reflection and at the forefront of burlesque stand to show how people, how pompous they can be and how reality is taken away. Pope and fielding have successfully educated the readers and how you can come to understand human nature better.   

The effectiveness of the treatment of burlesques can be seen through two stories namely Henry Fielding's 'Joseph Andrews' and Alexander Pope's 'The Rape of Lock.' These novels are two fine examples of incongruous imitation, the form that imitates the manner form and style and subject matter of a serious work....

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Sophocles' Oedipus, the King is a...Sophocles' Oedipus, the King is a great representation of Greek tragedy and of the human experience. Within it, he explores the intricacies of human thinking and communication along with its ability to change as more information and knowledge is acquired. His primary focus as the story begins and progresses is the growth of Oedipus from an unintelligible and unenlightened mentality to its antithesis. Because the story was one familiar to most of its viewers in its time, there are certain things that they are expected to already know. Among them is the background to the legend. Most generally it was that it was prophesied that Laios and Jocasta, king and queen of Thebes, would give birth to a child who would grow up to murder his father and marry his mother. And, fearing the dreadful prophecy, that the parents nailed their first son"s feet together thus the name Oedipus, which means "swollen-foot" and left him to die on a lonely moun-tainside outside the city. Moreover, that he was found by a wandering shepherd who took him to the nearby city of Corinth where he was adopted by the childless King Polybos and Queen Merope who raised him as a son and prince in the royal household. Then, when he was a young adult and first heard the prophecy, that he assumed that it applied to Polybos and Merope, the only parents he had ever known, and had fled Corinth and wandered around Greece where he met a group of travelers and killed an old man who, unknown to him, was his real father, King Laios. Then, when he arrived at Thebes, he met the Sphinx, a monster who guarded the gates of the city and correctly answered its riddle and was rewarded with the title of king of Thebes and was given the hand of the re-cently widowed queen, Jocasta. The true horror in his life begins here because he has four children with her, An-tigone, Ismene, Eteocles, and Polyneices and fulfills the prophecy. The story begins after some time after Oedipus has taken the throne and when there is a mysterious plague that sweeps the city. Here, he learns from the priest that the sacred oracle says that the plague will be re-moved only when Laios" murderer is discovered. Consequently, he sends Creon, his brother-in-law, to Delphi to consult the oracles and find out the identity of the murderer. On his return and relation of the news, he discovers his identity and of his parents and discovers his sins. In his despair, he blinds himself, and Jocasta hangs herself. He is exiled and Creon takes the throne of Thebes. During this entire fray of minds"”between Tiresias and Oedipus, Creon and Oedipus, and others"”certain idiosyncrasies of Oedipus are brazenly revealed. Among them, in the beginning, is his short temperament and quick judgment of situations as, for example, his confrontation of Creon after he had sent Tiresias away. He is quick to think that Creon conspired against him although he had no proof. However, by the end of the novel, he is humbled by his discovery of his sins and becomes a more enlightened man through his discovery of his ignorance of the realities of his world and his realization that there is no escaping destiny.   

Sophocles' Oedipus, the King is a great representation of Greek tragedy and of the human experience. Within it, he explores the intricacies of human thinking and communication along with its ability to change as more information and knowledge is acquired. His primary focus as the story begins and progresses is...

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