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In the poem, Theme for English B, Langston Hughes points out that we are often reluctant to admit that our similarities are often more common than our differences. Even though he is colored, he is still just like his white instructor in many ways. The colored man may appear to be different from the white man on the outside, but we are all the same on the inside. His skin color is different, and he comes from different a background, yet we have many things in common with each other. Hughes is only twenty-two, the only colored student in the class, and lives at the Y in Harlem. His instructor is older, white, and presumably lives in an upper class neighborhood. They are different in age, skin color, and are from different backgrounds. They are similar in that they both are engaged in the study of English literature at "the college on the hill" Hughes likes to "eat, sleep, drink, and be in love" and "work, read, learn, and understand life" 822 presumably just as the instructor or any other person, either colored or white, enjoys. He also likes "Bessie, bop, or Bach" 822. Typically, the Bessie and bop style of music is listened to mostly by the colored people. However, he also likes Bach, which is typically listened to mostly by the white people. So, even though he is colored, they are connected in that he likes things common to all races, even the music common to the white people. Hughes appears to regret his involvement in some portions of the instructor's world. He does not want to be a part of the white man, and believes that his white instructor does not want to be a part of him either. Hughes admits that he can learn from his instructor, and hopes that his instructor can learn from him. They both recognize that they can learn from their involvement and their differences from each other. He does not want to be judged as a colored man, but wants to be accepted as the man that he is "“ an American. Although they are different in the color of their skin, they are connected in that they are both American. We may come from different backgrounds and have some different likes, but we are all connected and can learn from each other. We must be accepting of each other, and appreciate our differences, yet recognize that we are similar in so many more ways.
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In the poem, Theme for English B, Langston Hughes points out that we are often reluctant to admit that our similarities are often more common than our differences. Even though he is colored, he is still just like his white instructor in many ways. The colored man may appear to be different from the white man on the outside, but we are all the same on the inside. His skin color is different, and he comes from different a background, yet we have many things in common with each other. Hughes is only twenty-two, the only colored student in the...
can learn from their involvement and their differences from each other. He does not want to be judged as a colored man, but wants to be accepted as the man that he is – an American. Although they are different in the color of their skin, they are connected in that they are both American.

We may come from different backgrounds and have some different likes, but we are all connected and can learn from each other. We must be accepting of each other, and appreciate our differences, yet recognize that we are similar in so many more ways.

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Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Brontë,...Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Brontë, is considered by many to be a "gothic" novel. The use of "supernatural" incidents, architecture, and a desolate setting helped to decide this classification for Jane Eyre. Many cases exhibited the use of "supernatural" occurrences. For example, when Jane Eyre was ten years old, she was locked in a room called the "Red Room" for misbehaving. In this room, it was written that her uncle passed away there. Because of being told this, Jane Eyre believed that the light she saw float across the wall was her passed away uncle coming to avenge her mistreatment. "Shaking my hair from my eyes, I lifted my head and tried to look boldly round the dark room; at this moment a light gleamed on the wall. Was it, I asked myself, a ray from the moon penetrating some aperture in the blind? No; moonlight was still, and this stirred; while I gazed, it glided up to the ceiling and quivered over my head"¦"¦"¦"¦I thought the swift-darting beam was a herald of some coming vision from another world." page 12 To further prove this point, an incident occurred in the Rochester house that, at the time it arose, was considered "supernatural." On an unsuspecting night, while Jane Eyre attempted to sleep, she was startled by demonic laughter. As Jane Eyre opened her door to find out who caused the laughter, she noted the hall dim, as if full of smoke. As she looked over to Mr. Rochester's door, she noticed smoke pouring out of the room. Upon inspection, she discovered the room fully ablaze. Although the incident is eventually explained later in the book, the reader might consider it quite "supernatural" and unexplainable. The fire in Mr. Rochester's room also helps to validate the idea of a "gothic" novel by architecture. Buildings constructed under the idea of "gothic" architecture are noted for being elaborately built and "rising toward Heaven." Thornfield Hall meets this idea perfectly. The structure of Thornfield Hall is large and evasive. Most of the rooms are described as being "dreary and solitary," due to their dimension. The amount of land owned by Mr. Rochester isolates Thornfield Hall and compliments the overpowering appearance of the house. The architecture and location of Thornfield Hall helps confirm the idea of a desolate setting. Thornfield Hall was located on an extensive amount of land owned by Mr. Rochester. Houses were located a great distance apart and it took a long time to travel from house to house. Visitors usually spent days at houses they were visiting because of the traveling distance. With the setting of a book such as Thornfield Hall in Jane Eyre being quite out of reach to other characters, it gives the reader an eerie feeling and allows the imagination to travel when an unusual incident takes place. This also occurs when Jane Eyre is traveling through the moors after she leaves Thornfield Hall. The moors were described as an uninhabited and desolate area. With this part of the story taking place at night in this area, the reader is left to imagine the possibilities of what could be in the overgrowth. Jane Eyre may have been written many years ago, but it is still a captivating book worth reading. It has the ability to capture and hold the reader's imagination, making it nearly impossible to put down at times. The "gothic" parts of the novel make it even more interesting, causing it to be a timeless classic that will be appreciated far into the future.   

Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Brontë, is considered by many to be a "gothic" novel. The use of "supernatural" incidents, architecture, and a desolate setting helped to decide this classification for Jane Eyre. Many cases exhibited the use of "supernatural" occurrences. For example, when Jane Eyre was ten years old,...

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