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In the poem, Theme for English B, Langston Hughes points out that we are often reluctant to admit that our similarities are often more common than our differences. Even though he is colored, he is still just like his white instructor in many ways. The colored man may appear to be different from the white man on the outside, but we are all the same on the inside. His skin color is different, and he comes from different a background, yet we have many things in common with each other. Hughes is only twenty-two, the only colored student in the class, and lives at the Y in Harlem. His instructor is older, white, and presumably lives in an upper class neighborhood. They are different in age, skin color, and are from different backgrounds. They are similar in that they both are engaged in the study of English literature at "the college on the hill" Hughes likes to "eat, sleep, drink, and be in love" and "work, read, learn, and understand life" 822 presumably just as the instructor or any other person, either colored or white, enjoys. He also likes "Bessie, bop, or Bach" 822. Typically, the Bessie and bop style of music is listened to mostly by the colored people. However, he also likes Bach, which is typically listened to mostly by the white people. So, even though he is colored, they are connected in that he likes things common to all races, even the music common to the white people. Hughes appears to regret his involvement in some portions of the instructor's world. He does not want to be a part of the white man, and believes that his white instructor does not want to be a part of him either. Hughes admits that he can learn from his instructor, and hopes that his instructor can learn from him. They both recognize that they can learn from their involvement and their differences from each other. He does not want to be judged as a colored man, but wants to be accepted as the man that he is "“ an American. Although they are different in the color of their skin, they are connected in that they are both American. We may come from different backgrounds and have some different likes, but we are all connected and can learn from each other. We must be accepting of each other, and appreciate our differences, yet recognize that we are similar in so many more ways.
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In the poem, Theme for English B, Langston Hughes points out that we are often reluctant to admit that our similarities are often more common than our differences. Even though he is colored, he is still just like his white instructor in many ways. The colored man may appear to be different from the white man on the outside, but we are all the same on the inside. His skin color is different, and he comes from different a background, yet we have many things in common with each other. Hughes is only twenty-two, the only colored student in the...
can learn from their involvement and their differences from each other. He does not want to be judged as a colored man, but wants to be accepted as the man that he is – an American. Although they are different in the color of their skin, they are connected in that they are both American.

We may come from different backgrounds and have some different likes, but we are all connected and can learn from each other. We must be accepting of each other, and appreciate our differences, yet recognize that we are similar in so many more ways.

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Persuasion "The evil that men do...Persuasion "The evil that men do lives after them, / the good is oft interred with their bones"¦ Act 3, Scene 2, Line 76." Simply put, after a man's death, only the evil that he did is remembered; the good is often forgotten. However, Antony's persuasive speech at Caesar's funeral is one to be remembered. After Brutus' oration, the plebeians thought Caesar was a tyrant and that Brutus did right to kill him. Antony convinces the plebeians that Caesar's death was unmerited, and that the conspirators should be punished. In his speech, Antony used several persuading devices. Antony used specific evidence to back up his opinions. He used verbal irony and rhetorics to invert what Brutus said. The speech was filled with loaded words- words with powerful connotations that affect the emotions. Antony used repetition to make the plebeians remember what he was saying. Antony also appealed to the people's self-interest, because the people cared most about themselves. He used props to give the people a vision to go with what they were hearing. And last, Antony used suspense to keep his listeners curious. Antony's speech was a model of success. Specific evidence supported Antony's opinions. Antony reminds the audience of when Caesar brought to Rome many captives, whose countrymen paid their ransoms; thus filling the public treasury. He adds that Caesar was sympathetic towards the poor. "When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept Act 3, Scene 2, Line 92." Antony also recalled when Caesar thrice refused the crown. This specific evidence shows the plebeians that Caesar was caring and generous towards them. Antony supported the fact that Caesar's death was undeserved. Most effectively, verbal irony supported Antony's cause. The strength of Antony's speech was that it simultaneously undermined the conspirators but appeared deferential to them. Antony does not want to come out and say "Brutus is an idiot, let's go kill him!" because the crowd would not support him right away. Instead, Antony resorts to subtle, yet effective, sarcasm. Antony states that Brutus and the conspirators are honorable men, but he means the opposite. When delivering these lines, Antony uses a sarcastic tone that inverts what Brutus said. Antony uses this same tone when referring to the conspirators as wise, truly meaning that they are ignorant. Antony rhetorically refers to Brutus as Caesar's "angel." He truly means that Brutus was evil. Antony's speech used verbal irony to destroy what Brutus previously said. Antony's speech was filled with powerful loaded words. Antony uses words with a powerful negative connotation when referring to the conspirators. He used such words as "against," "mutiny," "rage," and "envious" to develop a negative view of the conspirators. On the other hand, Antony used words with a strong positive connotation when speaking of Caesar. He uses words such as 'faithful," "sacred," and "loved" to give the plebeians a positive mindset of Caesar. Antony's persuasive language supported his cause. Antony used repetition to drive his opinions into the minds of the audience. Each time Antony cites Brutus' claim that Caesar was "ambitious," the claim loses credibility. Similarly, each time Antony states that Brutus is an "honorable man," it acquires an even more sarcastic tone, until its meaning has been entirely reversed. Antony knew that people believe and remember what is often repeated. He made them believe that Brutus and the conspirators were evil and dishonorable. Also, by repeatedly questioning Caesar's "ambition," Antony convinced people that Caesar, in fact, was not. Repetition was successful in this speech. The speech draws much of its power by manipulating the public's emotions. Antony appeals to the public's self-interest by informing them that in Caesar's will they were all to receive seventy-five silver coins. They were also to be allowed to treat his walks, private arbors, and newly planted orchards as recreation areas. The citizens are struck by this act of generosity. Antony also uses Caesar's mantle to invoke pity into the audience. He shows the plebeians where each conspirator stabbed through the mantle and delivered Caesar's death. Antony explains that Brutus' stab of ingratitude was the fatal blow. Antony stoked the audience's emotions to support his cause. Importantly, Antony used suspense to keep the audience curious. "My heart lies in the coffin there with Caesar/ and I must pause till it come back to me Act 3, Scene 2, Line 107." After delivering these emotional lines, Antony pauses to weep. The people are touched- they wonder if more ambitious people have stepped into this place. Antony also makes the people beg him to read Caesar's will. He waits until the plebeians are ready to leave, and then draws them back to read it. The citizens swear to avenge Caesar's death; they charge off to wreak havoc throughout the city. Antony's speech was intriguing and interesting as well as persuasive. Antony is passionate and convincing to the mob. He is successful in swaying the audience's opinions of Caesar's death and of the conspirators. Antony provides sufficient evidence to support his opinions. He uses verbal irony and repetition to undermine Brutus' speech. Antony's loaded words influenced the people's opinions of Caesar and the conspirators. Antony put on a "show-and-tell" routine to appeal to the people's emotions. Antony's speech did not bore the people- it kept them interested and involved. Antony proves he is a persuasive orator. Antony's funeral speech is a timeless classic.   

Persuasion "The evil that men do lives after them, / the good is oft interred with their bones… Act 3, Scene 2, Line 76." Simply put, after a man's death, only the evil that he did is remembered; the good is often forgotten. However, Antony's persuasive speech at Caesar's funeral...

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Through the first person narrator, Edgar...Through the first person narrator, Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" illustrates how man's imagination is capable of being so vivid that it profoundly affects people's lives. The manifestation of the narrator's imagination unconsciously plants seeds in his mind, and those seeds grow into an unmanageable situation for which there is no room for reason and which culminates in murder. The narrator takes care of an old man with whom the relationship is unclear, although the narrator's comment of "For his gold I had no desire" Poe 34 lends itself to the fact that the old man may be a family member whose death would monetarily benefit the narrator. Moreover, the narrator also intimates a caring relationship when he says, "I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult" 34. The narrator's obsession with the old man's eye culminates in his own undoing as he is engulfed with internal conflict and his own transformation from confidence to guilt. The fixation on the old man's vulture-like eye forces the narrator to concoct a plan to eliminate the old man. The narrator confesses the sole reason for killing the old man is his eye: "Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees "“ very gradually "“ I made up my mind to rid myself of the eye for ever" 34. The narrator begins his tale of betrayal by trying to convince the reader he is not insane, but the reader quickly surmises the narrator indeed is out of control. The fact that the old man's eye is the only motivation to murder proves the narrator is so mentally unstable that he must search for justification to kill. In his mind, he rationalizes murder with his own unreasonable fear of the eye. The narrator wrestles with conflicting feelings of responsibility to the old man and feelings of ridding his life of the man's "Evil Eye" 34. Although afflicted with overriding fear and derangement, the narrator still acts with quasi-allegiance toward the old man; however, his kindness may stem more from protecting himself from suspicion of watching the old man every night than from genuine compassion for the old man. The narrator shows his contrariety when he confesses he loves the old man, but he is still too overwhelmed by the pale blue eye to restrain himself from the all-consuming desire to eliminate the eye. His struggle is evident as he waits to kill the old man in his sleep so that he won't have to face the old man when he kills him; but on the other hand, the narrator can't justify the killing unless the vulture eye was open. The narrator is finally able to kill the man because "I saw it with perfect distinctness "“ all a dull blue, with a hideous veil over it that chilled the very marrow in my bones; but I could see nothing else of the old man's face or person: for I had directed the ray as if by instinct, precisely upon the damned spot" 35. The mission of the narrator begins with meticulous planning and confidence, but ultimately his guilty conscience creates his downfall. For seven days, the narrator watches the old man while he sleeps and he even "chuckled at the idea" that the old man knows nothing of the narrator's "secret deeds or thoughts" 35. The narrator's comments show his confidence and audacity, even pride, in his plan to kill: "Never before that night had I felt the extent of my own powers "“ of my sagacity. I could scarcely contain my feelings of triumph" 34-35. The narrator's assurance in his evil deed continued even when the police came to check on the old man and investigate the loud noises neighbors heard the night before: "I smiled,"”for what had I to fear? I bade the gentlemen welcome" 36. However, the narrator's mind is quickly consumed with guilt, which creates his delusion of hearing the old man's heartbeat taunting him from under the flooring. His paranoia makes the heart beat "louder "“ louder "“ louder!" and in his state of delirium he confesses to killing the old man in hopes of ridding his life of the menacing heartbeat: "I felt that I must scream or die! "“ and now ["¦]" 37. The narrator sets out to rid his life of the fear he created by obsessing over the man's eye, but once that fear is destroyed, another fear "“ that of the heartbeat "“ is created and becomes more overwhelming than the first. In playing mind games with himself "“ seeing how far he can push himself to triumph over his own insanity "“ the narrator slips further into a fantasy world. His overriding confidence in killing the man ultimately turns into overriding guilt even as he justifies in his mind the savage killing, chopping up the body and placing it under the floorboards. The narrator's imagination creates his need and plan to destroy the eye, but it then creates the need to save himself from the heartbeat that drives him over the edge.   

Through the first person narrator, Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" illustrates how man's imagination is capable of being so vivid that it profoundly affects people's lives. The manifestation of the narrator's imagination unconsciously plants seeds in his mind, and those seeds grow into an unmanageable situation for which there...

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