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In the poem, Theme for English B, Langston Hughes points out that we are often reluctant to admit that our similarities are often more common than our differences. Even though he is colored, he is still just like his white instructor in many ways. The colored man may appear to be different from the white man on the outside, but we are all the same on the inside. His skin color is different, and he comes from different a background, yet we have many things in common with each other. Hughes is only twenty-two, the only colored student in the class, and lives at the Y in Harlem. His instructor is older, white, and presumably lives in an upper class neighborhood. They are different in age, skin color, and are from different backgrounds. They are similar in that they both are engaged in the study of English literature at "the college on the hill" Hughes likes to "eat, sleep, drink, and be in love" and "work, read, learn, and understand life" 822 presumably just as the instructor or any other person, either colored or white, enjoys. He also likes "Bessie, bop, or Bach" 822. Typically, the Bessie and bop style of music is listened to mostly by the colored people. However, he also likes Bach, which is typically listened to mostly by the white people. So, even though he is colored, they are connected in that he likes things common to all races, even the music common to the white people. Hughes appears to regret his involvement in some portions of the instructor's world. He does not want to be a part of the white man, and believes that his white instructor does not want to be a part of him either. Hughes admits that he can learn from his instructor, and hopes that his instructor can learn from him. They both recognize that they can learn from their involvement and their differences from each other. He does not want to be judged as a colored man, but wants to be accepted as the man that he is "“ an American. Although they are different in the color of their skin, they are connected in that they are both American. We may come from different backgrounds and have some different likes, but we are all connected and can learn from each other. We must be accepting of each other, and appreciate our differences, yet recognize that we are similar in so many more ways.
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In the poem, Theme for English B, Langston Hughes points out that we are often reluctant to admit that our similarities are often more common than our differences. Even though he is colored, he is still just like his white instructor in many ways. The colored man may appear to be different from the white man on the outside, but we are all the same on the inside. His skin color is different, and he comes from different a background, yet we have many things in common with each other. Hughes is only twenty-two, the only colored student in the...
can learn from their involvement and their differences from each other. He does not want to be judged as a colored man, but wants to be accepted as the man that he is – an American. Although they are different in the color of their skin, they are connected in that they are both American.

We may come from different backgrounds and have some different likes, but we are all connected and can learn from each other. We must be accepting of each other, and appreciate our differences, yet recognize that we are similar in so many more ways.

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One of the most famous... One of the most famous soliloquies in the play Macbeth is the "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow"¦" soliloquy. The soliloquy takes place after Macbeth knows that Macduff is going to charge his castle. The last prophecy from the witches is no one born of woman will harm Macbeth. At this moment, Macbeth is not worried that Macduff can harm him because Macduff is born of a woman. Macbeth is getting a little worried though because Macduff's men are approaching Macbeth's castle. He then hears the news that his wife is dead and commences with this famous soliloquy. The soliloquy can be found on page 356 in Act 5, lines 21-30. The first line in the soliloquy is "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time;" This means that time will inconsiderably and slowly go on from day to day and until the end of time. Macbeth has a major reason to say that time will move slowly, because he has just heard the news that his wife is dead and that he has no queen to rule with him. The second line if the soliloquy is "And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death." This means that yesterday has only created fools. Macbeth says this because he was foolish for listening to Lady Macbeth and killing Duncan. He now sees the consequences she has paid for her dirty deed, which were sleepwalking and now death. The third line in this soliloquy is probably the most famous which is "Out, Out, brief candle!" This is Macbeth showing that his candle, Lady Macbeth, has been blown out. At this moment, there is a sense of emptiness inside of Macbeth because his wife has died. The next line says, "Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage And then is heard no more." This is showing that real life is like a play. This shows that a person's life is like an actor's role in a play because after a person dies, you do not hear from them anymore. This is just like when a play is over, you do not hear from the actor again, because the actor's job has ended. The last line of the soliloquy is "It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury Signifying nothing." This means that a person is foolish by getting ahead by wrong means, which in the end does not grant them any satisfaction. This flashes back to when Lady Macbeth says, "Where our desire is got without content, 'Tis safer to be that which we destroy Than be destruction dwell in doubtful joy. Act 3, Scene 2, Lines 5-7." She is unhappy with herself in this passage because she had just been crowned queen but she is not happy with this because the guilt of plotting the murder of Duncan is weighing on her mind. Lady Macbeth has now paid for the murder of Duncan with her own agony and life. The soliloquy is filled with many emotions such as lethargy, hatred, bitterness, despair, weariness, and hopelessness. All of these emotions come through in this soliloquy because it is a time of immense pressure for Macbeth because his wife has just died and his castle is going to be charged upon. He is lethargic toward time because it is going to move so slow to him because his wife is dead. He has hatred and bitterness toward himself because he is the one who murdered Duncan. He has despair, weariness, and hopelessness toward life in general because his wife is dead and his castle is going to be marched upon. This soliloquy is very important to the play because it is Macbeth's last soliloquy and it sums up his life and life in general. It helps to show his decline in emotions and a decline in the way he feels toward what is going on his life, because his wife has died and his castle is being taken from him.   

One of the most famous soliloquies in the play Macbeth is the "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow…" soliloquy. The soliloquy takes place after Macbeth knows that Macduff is going to charge his castle. The last prophecy from the witches is no one born of woman will harm Macbeth. At...

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"It is precisely of him that..."It is precisely of him that I wished to speak. Dispose of me as you please; but help me first to carry him home. I only ask that of you." Upon examination of Les Miserables, it is clearly evident that the elements of Forgiveness, Self "“ Sacrifice, and Courage are only a few of the main themes Hugo wanted to develop. First off, is the element of forgiveness. In a book of mistrust, poverty, and hate"¦forgiveness thrives in the world of Les Miserables. The first example of this was at the very beginning, when Jean Valjean stayed with the bishop. Valjean stole his silver"¦and ran off. He ends up being caught by police, but when the police questioned the bishop, he claimed to have given the silver to Valjean. Jean was confused"¦and the bishop claimed that with the silver, he had purchased the convicts soul, and had given it to God, and from that day forward, Valjean must be a good man. Another example of forgiveness goes two ways. Javert, in his relentless pursuit of Valjean, is captured by revolutionaries. In reward for saving the lives of a few of these revolutionaries, Valjean asks for, and gets, permission to take Javert outside, and kill him. Once outside, a small monologue occurs"¦and Valjean releases Javert, and lets him go free. Valjean just wanted to be left alone in peace, and hoped this act of kindness would change Javert, and make him realize that Valjean was no longer the man he was. The second way"¦is that in the end, after Javert finally captures Valjean, he lets him go. Since Javert had broken the law"¦ that he loved so dearly, he kills himself shortly thereafter, by jumping into a river. Secondly, we come to the element of Self-Sacrifice. This is also another widely used theme in Les Miserables. One such example of this element is with Valjean. He lets Marius and Cosette marry, and for a while, he seems all right with that fact. Later on however, he goes to Marius, and confesses to his past. He tells Marius his whole story, and thinks it best if he never sees Cosette again. Marius agrees"¦but allows Valjean the occasional visit. Only at the end, does Marius realize what a good man Valjean is"¦and by then it was too late. Valjean dies shortly after Marius and Cosette visit him to ask him to come back and live with them. Another example would be that of Gavroche and his supreme sacrifice. Gavroche is really Thenardier's son"¦. but he was thrown out as a little boy, because he wasn't bringing in any money. So Gavroche befriends the revolutionaries. During one of the battles, Gavroche goes out to pick the pockets of the dead soldiers for ammunition. The soldiers fighting the revolutionaries immediately open fire"¦but cant hit Gavroche. Thinking he is invincible, he begins to mock the soldier's aim. But, he speaks too soon, and on his way back, he is shot in the back, and dies. And lastly, we have the sacrifice of Eponine"¦one of the daughter's of Thenardier. She is in love with Marius"¦unbeknownst to him. She follows him to the barricades, and while there, saves his life. She put her hand in front of a barrel aimed for Marius, and the bullet went through her hand, and into her body. Of course, this act moves Marius greatly. Eponine admits her love to him, and tells him everything she knows. Before she dies in his arms, she asks him to kiss her on the forehead when she passes on"¦and she says she would feel it. Marius grants her wish. And finally, we reach the element of Courage. The main kind of courage that will be covered is emotional and physical. The first example is when Valjean must enter Paris by climbing the wall that surrounds the great city. Normally, this would be hard enough for anyone. Valjean however, has one more problem added to this; he has Cosette with him, and she is still a small child. Once he finally reaches the top, and Cosette joins him, they must jump from roof to roof to reach safety. They finally end up in a Convent, and fortunate for Valjean, it is the one where he knows the Caretaker. So, for the next few years, he and Cosette live in the convent, and have a happy life. Next"¦Valjean saves Marius from the barricades. During the end of the battle, Marius is wounded, the barricade is shot to pieces, and the soldiers are moving in to kill anyone who resists. Delirious due to being wounded, Marius begins to think that he should never see Cosette again. Valjean runs over to Marius, and removes him from the area, and escapes with him into the sewers. As always, Javert is hot on his trail. After walking through a sewer for the entire day, Valjean and Marius escape"¦to find Thenardier waiting with the key. After cutting a deal to get free, Valjean thinks he is in the clear"¦and then Javert shows up, and arrests him. Valjean showed great courage, and even in the face of extreme danger to himself, he still saved Marius. And finally, Valjean lets Marius and Cosette marry. He knows it will mean that he wont see as much of Cosette as he would like, and he would be lonely. But he also knows it will make her very happy, and in the end, that is all Valjean really wants for her. He does end up dieing because of loneliness in the end, but he dies knowing that he is loved, because Marius and Cosette come to him, and ask him to come back"¦but as stated earlier, it was already too late. In conclusion, Les Miserables shows the main themes of Forgiveness, Self-Sacrifice, and Courage. It shows how a person's life can be saved by a simple act of kindness"¦and how a life can be destroyed by the absence of happiness.   

"It is precisely of him that I wished to speak. Dispose of me as you please; but help me first to carry him home. I only ask that of you." Upon examination of Les Miserables, it is clearly evident that the elements of Forgiveness, Self – Sacrifice, and Courage are...

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