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The Unjust Isolation of Frankenstein's Creation and Other Reasons to Never Become a Model: Societal Prejudices in Shelley's Frankenstein A Swiss Proverb once enlightened, "When one shuts one eye, one does not hear everything". Sadly, vision is the primary sense of mankind and often the solitary basis of judgment. Without human's limitations of the shapes, colors and textures of our overall outward appearances, the world would be a place that emphasizes morals, justice and intelligence rather than bravado, cuteness, and sexual attraction. For if there were no predetermined ideal models defining the beautiful possibilities of the human body's variation, one would never suffer isolation due to one's disability, unattractiveness, or unusual physical attribute. Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein, sheds light on the eternal illusory and importance of appearance through the tale of an unwanted creation that is never given a chance. Ironically, the supposed beast was initially much more compassionate and thoughtful than his creator, until his romantic and innocent view of the human race was diminished by the cruelty and injustice he unduly bore. Not only does the creature suffer the prejudice of an appearance-based society, but other situations and characters in the novel force the reader to reflect their own hasty crimes of judgment in an intelligent and adult fashion. The semi- gothic novel includes several instances of societal prejudice that include the isolation and outcast of Frankenstein's creation, the creature's biased opinion of the cottagers, and the unbalanced and inappropriate classification of Victor. Throughout the course of the creature's isolated and pathetic journey, he is never given the opportunity to participate in human interaction, as he so deeply deserves. Upon his creation, the reaction of Victor, his maker, is so vividly appalling; one forgets that this is actually the birth of a human being. His 'father', Victor, is so selfish and has such a lack of responsibility and foresight, that he creates a human being for the simple purpose of recreation, intellectual stimulation, and the thrill of 'the chase'. Frankenstein himself refers to his own creation as, ""¦the life which I had so thoughtlessly bestowed" 88; ch.1; vol. 2. Victor is solely interested in the beneficial aspects on the surface of creating, just as his interest in the exterior 'monster' is superficial. Not only is Victor's quest selfish, but his goal is frivolous as well. Victor's initial opinion of his creature is that of disappointment, although he succeeds in his destination to create a living being from inanimate pieces. The disappointment is not only irrational, but also shows his further jaded ideal of perfection in the fact that he considers ugliness a weakness. If that were true, ugliness would be the creature's only weakness, as the story goes on to tell of the selfless acts of kindness the creature administers. Victor describes his supposed miserable failure as a deformed monster when he says "His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of lustrous black, and flowing his teeth of pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only form a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun-white sockets in which they were set, his shriveled complexion and straight black lips" 56; ch.5; vol.1. Later, Victor sees the creature after a long period of his aimless roaming, and he "trembled with rage and horror" 95; ch. 3; vol .2. Victor wished to engage in mortal combat because he had a faint premonition the creature might have possibly killed his son. The senseless idea was formed simply because of the creature's physical features, and that he may have been in the vicinity. Even though the monster was shunned, hated, labeled prematurely as a killer, and cursed by his very own maker, he sees the goodness of the human heart and desires to learn more about the human race. As the supposed monster journeys onward, he is delighted and allured by the moon and sun, and other peaceful, natural and romantic settings. He describes a community as, "miraculous" 102; ch. 3; vol. 2, and sacrifices his own hunger by refusing to steal from poverty-stricken cottagers. Contrary to the creature's serene emotions, the villagers react in an absurd frenzy: "the children shrieked, and one of the women fainted" 102; ch. 3; vol. 2. The creature's deformity even took a profound effect on his own state of mind. The creature reflects, " Alas! I did not entirely know the fatal effects of this miserable infirmity" 110; ch. 4; vol. 2, and ponders, "Was I, then, a monster, a blot upon the earth, from which all men fled and whom all woman disowned?" 117; ch. 5; vol. 2. The reader wonders if the creature has fell into the unfeeling void of prejudice and believes he is an outsider to mankind that deserves his bleak fate. Finally upon hearing the creature's story Victor expresses a hint of pity for the creature, "I compassioned him and sometimes felt a wish to console him"¦" 142; ch. 9; vol. 2, although Victor goes on to say, " But when I saw the filthy mass that moved and talked, my heart sickened and my feelings were altered to those of horror and hatred" 142; ch. 9; vol. 2. At the conclusion of the novel, Victor refuses to create another, and end the creature's miserable asylum due to the simple belief that beasts cannot nor should live peacefully in the comfort of love and kinship. The cottagers also display a contrast of truth and appearance. The creature almost falls in love with the family from a distance. He thinks they exude natural innocence and kinship by simply viewing them from afar. Without actually interacting physically or emotionally with the group, the monster incessantly passes discernment while safely camouflaging himself in the background and daydreaming. Although the monster notices the differences of age and varying body forms, he nonetheless gives the cottagers decent and moral roles with no intelligent basis. The creature remarks, "One was old, with silver hairs and a countenance beaming with benevolence and love: the younger was slight and graceful in his figure, and his features were molded in the finest symmetry" 105; ch. 3; vol. 2. Merely due to the disparity of the creatures physical attributes and the cottagers, the creature looks upon them as, "superior beings" 111; ch. 3; vol. 2, and believes "that they would be disgusted by my gentle demeanour and conciliating words " Satirically, the gentle and soothing words of the cottagers would be natural and fitting, as the 'monster's' appears repelling. Alas, the creature discovers the true souls of these treasured humans whom he has so greatly bestowed the hope of equality. When the younger cottagers invade the comrades' peaceful discussion, their horror and consternation is indescribable to the articulate being. The blind man slightly penetrates the inhibitions of appearance when he says, "there is something in your words which persuades me that you are sincere" 130; ch. 7; vol. 2. Although even he falters the evil test of true equipollence when he utters, "I am blind and cannot judge of your countenance" If the blind man only knew the error of his words, the creature may have found a true home. The untimely assessment of Victor as an inoffensive and harmless existence symbolizes the generous leniency one gives to another that through appearance is viewed as a reflection of oneself. Victor has several nervous breakdowns and becomes reclusive at times. His unusual behavior goes unnoticed by his family and friends due to his seemingly safe and passive physical stature. Victor reflects on the grievances of his beloved Elizabeth and father. He sheds light on the disagreement between his image of innocence and the true broken shell of a man he inhabits: "Frankenstein, your son, your kinsman, your early, much-loved friend; he who would spend each vital drop of blood for your sakes- who has no thought nor sense of joy, except as it is mirrored also in your dear countenance" 86; ch. 8; vol. 1. After several episodes of intense worry and emotional drain, Victor descends into another world of physical and emotional pain that proceeds to affect the emotional states of his family and friends. Victor's guilt is expressed when he says, "My father's care and attentions were indefatigable; but he did not know the origin of my sufferings" 179; ch. 5; vol. 3. Even when Victor avoids society and is in a state of utter despair, his father refuses to acknowledge that this normal, pleasing-looking, blood-related, and seemingly sane human is indirectly responsible for such horrendous acts of malice. Victor, like his creation, was the victim of hasty opinions regarding the nature of their personal inner countenances. The semi- gothic novel includes several instances of societal prejudice that include the isolation and outcast of Frankenstein's creation, the creature's biased opinion of the cottagers, and the unbalanced and inappropriate classification of Victor. The universal quest for acceptance has led many humans to irrevocable and indecent acts. No one truly desires for their own brethren to lead a life of eternal heartache and hardship, yet we allow it to happen everyday. The simple meaninglessness of a person's appearance can cause isolation no human should have to endure. The flashes of airbrushed and plastic beauty that are copied and pasted on every media outlet in today's information age give usually intelligent and morally-intent human beings short attention spans for anything other than our own selfish well-being. For the small duration of time we do think about anything beside ourselves, we are bombarded with pity cases for the specifically cute and child-victims. In the meantime, the not-so-cute and older victims are left to fend for themselves and most human beings go on pretending the confidant and assertiveness that come with knowledge and modern civilization rule society. Meanwhile, people of all ages, sexes, and races continually binge and purge, starve and isolate themselves, and become depressed or angry. We incessantly turn a blind eye to the superfluous suffering of our brothers and sisters, and even condone the labeling of Victor's benevolent 'child' as 'monster'. Had the image-obsessed society paused for one moment to introspect the personality that they feared, a multitude of lives could have been saved.
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The Unjust Isolation of Frankenstein's Creation and Other Reasons to Never Become a Model: Societal Prejudices in Shelley's Frankenstein A Swiss Proverb once enlightened, "When one shuts one eye, one does not hear everything". Sadly, vision is the primary sense of mankind and often the solitary basis of judgment. Without human's limitations of the shapes, colors and textures of our overall outward appearances, the world would be a place that emphasizes morals, justice and intelligence rather than bravado, cuteness, and sexual attraction. For if there were no predetermined ideal models defining the beautiful possibilities of the human body's variation,...
and older victims are left to fend for themselves and most human beings go on pretending the confidant and assertiveness that come with knowledge and modern civilization rule society. Meanwhile, people of all ages, sexes, and races continually binge and purge, starve and isolate themselves, and become depressed or angry. We incessantly turn a blind eye to the superfluous suffering of our brothers and sisters, and even condone the labeling of Victor's benevolent 'child' as 'monster'. Had the image-obsessed society paused for one moment to introspect the personality that they feared, a multitude of lives could have been saved.
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Wikipedia encyclopedia suggests "the word experience...Wikipedia encyclopedia suggests "the word experience may refer somewhat ambiguously both to mentally unprocessed immediately-perceived events as well as to the purported wisdom gained in subsequent reflection on those events or interpretation of them. Most wisdom-experience accumulates over a period of time, though one can also experience and gain general wisdom-experience from a single specific momentary event." In novels On the Road and Saint Maybe, by Jack Kerouac and Anne Tyler, the authors stress upon life as a set of experiences and how these builds a person. Utterly and completely carefree are the characters, blowing and twisting on the maelstrom of their whims, each lunging twinge of a mental process reflected in miles. A laughing blue sky above waiting to swallow one alive, a gleefully roaring engine burning hungrily in front, the road and its devils grinning wickedly below, Jack Kerouac"s characters go flying off randomly along the twisted contours of their lives in his autobiographical epic On the Road. In Part I, Chapter 11, when Paradise abandons his screenplay in order to find a job,"shadow of disappointment" crosses Remi Boncoeur"s face; even though no words are spoken at this point, the look on poor Remi"s face is quite enough to form a rhetorical appeal. The look conveys the sentiments of the central characters of the book that trivialities such as everyday jobs should be cast aside in favor of following one"s dream. For one, this is an appeal from character; Remi, crestfallen that Sal has turned his back on his dream, is a person who has no qualms about stealing couches, or food, or stripping a ghost ship of its valuables. In this way, his desire to live the moment is connected with his questionable morals--a problem somewhat relieved when his general goodness is illustrated by having him try to organize an evening out in order to put his father at ease. When Remi wants something, he takes it, but he"s a decent, big-hearted person overall--almost childlike. It should be observed that he has the amorality of a little kid. Therefore, this appeal from character should be seen as a cry for living one"s dream-- an almost naive way of thinking of things, seen from the childlike eyes of Remi Boncoeur. Second, this passage contains an appeal to emotion. Remi"s facial expression intends to prod that part of Sal, and the reader, that would like to continually live on and for the moment, chasing dreams, and never for moments surrender to the mundane. Time and again, the characters shift across the blazing heartland of America, yearning for release, for wonder. They live in the thrall of today and now. Of course, there are exceptions, moments where the restless lusting encounters resistance. In Part I, Chapter 13, page 96, at the time when he is living with Terry, there is a passage wherein Sal describes picking cotton, and he says "I thought I had found my life"s work". He and Terry and her boy live together, and Sal temporarily forgets his friends and his wanderlust. Short-lived though this period might be, Sal becomes a "man of the earth" and returns to the "simple life". Eventually, though, he tells Terry that he has to leave and is on the road again. Not long after, though, he settles down with his aunt for an extended period of time. He actually spends a year living the normal life. All it takes is Dean roaring up in a beat-up Hudson to send him back in full force to the road. For most of the rest of the novel, he and his ever-shifting company of friends roam ceaselessly around the continent. In the first chapter of Part three, on page 179, Sal moves to Denver, where he thinks of living the normal life--"I saw myself in Middle America, a patriarch. I was lonesome. Nobody was there"¦" This last sentence is the key, of course. Separated from his friends, most particularly Dean, Sal gives in to the stereotypical American mindset. But when he finds Dean again, and Camille kicks them both out, they embark on another series of excursions, the only binding elements being the road and the mislaid faith in reaching Italy. The pivotal time in the course of their relationship, this is when Dean and Sal make their friendship concrete. Though they never reach Italy, they travel and party and live for the moment, and have seemingly little regret when it is over. They go their separate ways for a while, then reunite and, with the company of friends, head out again on the road, this time ending up in Mexico. Here arrives another critical point; Sal falls ill and Dean abandons him. Sal, dejected, eventually recovers from his illness and then returns home. It is in Part Five, pages 305 and 307, that Kerouac describes the continent as "awful." This is the last adjective describing America in the novel, it is important in that it relates Sal"s mindset at the end of his travels with Dean. It is not wonderment he feels anymore, but sadness. This too is a theme that can be traced throughout the book, entwining itself with the dual theme of freedom. It seems that everywhere Sal goes, he loses a friend or a lover, from Terry to Remi Boncoeur to Dean Moriarty. Apparently, Kerouac seems to be insinuating that freedom brings pain as well as joy, for when a person does what he wants to do when he want to do it; the bridges are in eternal danger of burning around him, leaving him severed, forsaken, and alone. The book finally ends at the parting of Sal and Dean in New York, the final repeated thought being "I think of Dean Moriarty". It would seem that living life for the moment exposed Sal to great ecstasy and torment, but it is the torment that rings the clearest in his prose, the bittersweet quality that echoes through even the happiest passages. "Love is a duel," rages Sal when he leaves Terry. Nowhere is this more apparent than in his love for the road, where the conflict between pleasure and sorrow escalates awkwardly until the very end, when Sal, weary and sad, watches his best friend disappear around the corner of Seventh Street. Anne Tyler in her novel, Saint Maybe, shows "ordinary" people and their ordinary lives. She displays the fact that people in this world are only human and are hence bound to make mistakes, yet they struggle to survive with the attempt to work out the problems they face in relationships and communication. Saint Maybe is an involving story, played out over many years, with appealing characters that grow and evolve. It also provokes thoughts about so many things: religion, redemption, the randomness of life, but above all, the nature of family and how it too affects the course of life. The journey of the seventeen-year-old protagonist, Ian Bedloe, begins when he doesn"t imagine the consequences of his actions. He suspects there is more to Lucy's past and to the problems of her present, than either Danny or the rest of the family has acknowledged. And one night, when Ian"s plans for a romantic evening with his girlfriend-indeed, it is the night he plans to lose his virginity-are disrupted by having to baby-sit Lucy"s children longer than he was supposed to, Ian becomes enraged. And so, on the way home, Ian tells his brother what he suspects about Lucy, and also mentions that the daughter, for whom Danny abandoned his studies to marry Lucy, is not his child. In disbelief and horror, Danny commits suicide by driving his car into a wall. This tragedy shatters the Bedloe family, but the family rebuilds into a nontraditional grouping in which blood matters less than love--and love is not automatic but grows through years of familiarity. And the family-building is driven more by chance than choice--as, the characters learn, most of life is; very little turns out how they had planned, but they make the best of what they"re dealt. The following year while Ian is away at college, Lucy kills herself with drug overdose, and the daughter along with the two other of Lucy's children from a previous marriage has to be cared for by Ian's rapidly aging parents, and he can hardly bear the weight of the guilt on his conscience. He rightly recognizes that the night of Danny"s death will change his life forever. Further, because of his doubts over the veracity of what he told Danny, and the very fact that he had said anything, Ian is racked by guilt over his role in Danny"s, and now also Lucy"s, death. Ian wishes that causing somebody"s suicide was something for which one could go to prison, for at least then he would have an identifiable way of paying for what he had done. As it is, he simply wants to confess what he has done. He recognizes the importance of confession, both to "unburden" his own conscience and to test his reading of the situation with others. But Ian initially finds it difficult to do so, primarily because his family and girlfriend do not want to bear the burden of bad news. Or, more strongly put, they might not want to face the truth of what Ian has done. He seeks out religion to help him deal with his guilt but it repels him with its shallow and sterile façade of formality. But one day he wanders into a storefront church intriguingly called The Church of the Second Chance. For Ian, the driving force of life is the Church of the Second Chance, which shows him a way to channel his guilt over complicity in the family tragedy. This church's main doctrine is that total forgiveness will come when one offers concrete, practical reparation for the committed offense. Christ makes up for the difference between the maximum reparation sacrifice one can offer and the damage caused by the sinful behavior. God wants to know how far "you'll go to undo the harm you've done" pg. 123, the Reverend tells Ian. "It's the religion of atonement and complete forgiveness"¦ It's the religion of the Second Chance" pg. 124. And in Ian's case, this means a beginning of a new life. He steps away from his education and becomes an apprentice, but he does so hoping to find an insular world of inanimate objects. Such a desire signals an intensified withdrawal from the vagaries of human communication and the vulnerability of human relationships. Ian participates fully in the Church's program of Good Works, and he takes full responsibility for raising the three children. Unfortunately, Ian seems to think he ought to do these things in order to earn forgiveness. After rightly insisting to his father that Christian life requires a commitment of one"s entire being, Ian mistakenly draws the wrong conclusion. The changes in his life, he tells his father, are "something I have to do for myself, to be forgiven" pg 127. Rather than seeing a changed way of life as a consequence of God"s forgiveness, Ian sees forgiveness as something one has to earn through an extensive penance. In the process, Ian becomes very cautious in his life. He eventually does discover some grace precisely through the ordinariness of his life. He recognizes that "You could never call it a penance, to have to take care of these three. They were all that gave his life color, and energy, and ... well, life." Even more, Ian discovers a sense of new life through his encounter with, and eventual marriage to, Rita--a woman hired to "unclutter" the Bedloe house. As Alexander Pope once said, "a man should never be ashamed to own he has been in the wrong, which is by saying, in other words, that he is wiser today than he was yesterday." It is important that a person learns from their mistakes and take out a valuable lesson learned through their decisions and experiences, as life is a constant journey full of such experiences. The world does not stop for anyone's sake; it simply keeps going and does not put into consideration that the day did not go accordingly to plan, and to understand this is and move on is what builds character. In the novels On the Road and Saint Maybe, Kerouac and Tyler make this notion visible to the readers.   

Wikipedia encyclopedia suggests "the word experience may refer somewhat ambiguously both to mentally unprocessed immediately-perceived events as well as to the purported wisdom gained in subsequent reflection on those events or interpretation of them. Most wisdom-experience accumulates over a period of time, though one can also experience and gain general...

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Explore the social institution of... Explore the social institution of marriage in Austen"s society in a comparison of the proposals of Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy to Elizabeth Bennett In this essay, I will attempt to answer the above question by going through a number of stages. I will firstly gather a detailed knowledge of what marriage was like in Austen's society. From this I will be able to apply my findings to the proposals of Mr. Darcy and Mr. Collins. Whilst doing this, I will compare and contrast the two proposals and look at the reasons why they wanted marriage, their approaches to the matter and their reactions from the responses of Elizabeth Bennett. In Jane Austen's society, marriage was hugely different than that of today. This was evident in every aspect of marriage. Marriage was necessary for women in Austen's society. Without it they would have no income and could not create one for themselves. Women were also unable to inherit property after the death of a previous landowner. These factors mean that women were keen to marry early and not for the reasons associated with marriage of today. Nowadays, people wouldn't even consider marrying if love wasn't involved. During the time in question, however, love was somewhat irrelevant. Public perception of the couple was taken into consideration, however, regardless of the intentions of the couple. Marriage was seen as a status symbol and was closely linked to the class system. Jane Austen knew this society well as she was the unmarried daughter of a clergyman which fell in the social class known as gentry. She had no income and therefore had to depend on her brothers for support. All these factors must be considered when looking at the proposals of Mr. Darcy and Mr. Collins. The Bennett family has five daughters ranging in age from fifteen to twenty-five. They have no sons. In Austen's time, this would have been seen as a burden rather than an advantage. For each daughter that is married, a dowry has to be paid and in the case of the Bennett's, you are looking at a huge financial burden. The Bennett family is relatively well off and own land "“ 'Longbourn House'. As daughters cannot inherit, the land would pass on to Mr. Collins, a cousin of the family. Mrs. Bennett is desperate to find husbands for her daughters. Because of this, she is somewhat rash in making decisions for her daughter's futures. Elizabeth Bennett, the daughter who is focused on in this essay, is the most independent and assertive and unlike most women in Austen's time and society, will only marry for love. She presents a problem for the family as she is independent and thinks for herself and is likely to be the most difficult to get 'married off'. The Bennett family has five daughters ranging in age from fifteen up to twenty-five. They have no sons. At Jane Austen's time, this would have been seen as somewhat of a burden. This is because, for each daughter that is married, a dowry has to be paid and in the case of the Bennett's, you are looking at a huge financial burden. The Bennett family are quite well off and own areas of land, in this case, 'Longbourn house'. As daughters cannot inherit, the land would pass to Mr. Collins, a cousin of the family. He will be focused on later in the essay. Mrs. Bennett is desperate to find husbands for her daughters. She is somewhat rash in making her daughters' decisions which will decide their future though you can see it from her point of view as she has five daughters to marry off. Elizabeth Bennett, the daughter who is focused on during this essay, is the most independent and assertive and unlike most women of the time and society, will only marry for love. She presents a problem for the family and will undoubtedly be the most difficult to get married off. Austen's opening description of Mr. Collins' approach to proposal tells us a lot about his character. Austen writes, 'Mr. Collins made his declaration in form' This quotation tells us two things about the character of Mr. Collins. Firstly, Austen uses the word 'declaration' rather than 'proposal'. This tells us that Mr. Collins is extremely confident that he will receive a positive answer and even if he doesn't, he remains confident that he will marry Elizabeth. Austen also writes 'form'. This gives the implication that Mr. Collins is not talking about a subject which is 'close to his heart' but is laying down his personal reasons for marriage. This fact is later proved correct. So, before the 'proposal' has even begun, from a one line description of Mr. Collins, we have learnt that he is extremely selfish and probably does not really love Elizabeth. Austen follows this line with, 'Having resolved to do it without"¦"¦"¦"¦..business.' The first part of this quotation shows us that the only reason Mr. Collins is proposing at that particular time is because he does not want to miss another Sunday at church. These are not the actions of a man truly in love. Austen follows this up with a remark that Mr. Collins is proposing in a 'very orderly manner'. This reiterates my first point surrounding the lack of love in the 'relationship'. Austen finishes with the word 'business'. This proves to be an operative word in the analysis of Mr. Collins and is to be discovered later on. After asking to talk to Elizabeth, we see the perceptive side of her character as she begins to move away and refuse to talk to Mr. Collins. This shows us that she knows what is going on yet clearly is not interested in Mr. Collins. This alone would be considered enough to deter him. He is the opposite of perceptive, however, and continues with the 'proposal'. Mrs. Bennett 'insists' upon Elizabeth's staying and it is clear that neither her or Mr. Collins are concerned about Elizabeth's feelings. It is quite evident that she does not want to be in the position she has been forced into yet Mr. Collins perceives this quite differently, 'Believe me"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦perfection's.' Rather than accepting the obvious refusal of Elizabeth, Mr. Collins follows this up with a compliment directed towards Elizabeth in a futile attempt to win her over. From a reader's point of view, this seems pathetic and even humorous as Mr. Collins' true character begins to surface. Even after this, he continues to have the audacity to compliment her further. He says, 'Almost"¦"¦"¦"¦life.' This is not the complete truth, however, as he originally attempted to marry Jane yet was deterred by Mrs. Bennett. In Mr. Collins' 'finest moment', Austen writes, 'before I run away with my feelings.' This appears not only humorous to the reader but also to Elizabeth who has realised the futility of Mr. Collins' proposal, 'The idea"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦continued,' Mr. Collins now proceeds to list his reasons for marrying amongst which love is not mentioned once, he says, 'My reasons"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦..parish.' This line is fascinating in my opinion and has a certain edge of irony as Mr. Collins lacks perception yet is worried about the public's perception of him. This makes him appear all the more pompous and arrogant. He continues, 'secondly"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦.happiness.' Note Mr. Collins says 'my' happiness and again does not take Elizabeth's feelings into consideration. Mr. Collins is overtly ignorant to Elizabeth's attempted interruptions and continues to discuss the fact that his patroness, Mrs. Catherine De Bourgh also wishes him to marry. It seems that there is more reason for marriage between Mrs. Bennett and Lady Catherine De Bourgh than there is between the 'couple'. This, in itself is ridiculously humorous. Mr. Collins has humoured Elizabeth but not insulted her as of yet. This is to come, however, 'The fact is"¦"¦"¦"¦.years'. The implications from this are that he wishes her father dead so that he can inherit the land. This is not only selfish and tactless but also hurtful towards Elizabeth. Mr. Collins then says, 'And now"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦affection'. Just as it seems that Mr. Collins is to finally discuss love and affection, he contradicts himself by going on to talk about the matter of the dowry and his inheritance. He continues his contradictory manner by saying, 'To fortune"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦..indifferent'. Although he says so, it is clear that he is not indifferent to the matter of the dowry as he brings it up and discusses it on a number of occasions. Elizabeth finally gets the chance to speak and shows strength of character and is polite yet firm. Mr. Collins now appears ridiculous as his naiveté leads him to discuss the fact that Elizabeth secretly means to accept his proposal. Elizabeth notices the fact that Mr. Collins wants to be rich and is selfish et cetera and finally succeeds in refusing but only by leaving the room. From the proposal of Mr. Collins, a lot can be learnt about both his and Elizabeth's characters. Elizabeth is polite, firm and assertive and by far the most strong-minded character featured. She knows what she wants from life and takes the correct steps in achieving her aims. Mr. Collins, however, is much less of a character. He is overtly arrogant, audacious and naïve. He is selfish, pompous and arrogant. He lacks perception and is tactless. From the perspective of a non-reader of the novel, it would seem that I have simply listed all the negative words in the dictionary. This is Mr. Collins' character, however, and it is in my opinion that Elizabeth was correct to turn down his 'proposal'. Elizabeth later receives another proposal from Mr. Darcy. Austen writes, 'When they"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦Kent'. So, from this quotation, we have learnt even before the arrival of Mr. Darcy, that Elizabeth bears a grudge towards him yet her cause for this is later proved incorrect. Austen continues to describe Elizabeth's dislike for Mr. Darcy. When Elizabeth first sees Mr. Darcy, it is described as being to her 'utter amazement'. This proves to the reader that Mr. Darcy is the last person Elizabeth expected and probably hoped to see. Darcy proceeds to inquire after Elizabeth's health and Austen writes that Elizabeth, 'Answered him with cold civility'. This, in my opinion, is admirable on Elizabeth's part as it is evident that she possesses a distinct hatred for this man yet still has the manners to be civil with him. From the very beginning of Darcy's proposal, it is clear that his differs substantially from Mr. Collins'. The opening line of Mr. Darcy's proposal reads, 'In vain"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦.love you'. This quotation tells us two things about the character of Mr. Darcy. His opening line is rather inconsiderate towards Elizabeth's feelings as he is saying that he has struggled against loving her. The reasons for this become evident further on. He does, however, use the word 'vain', Which shows that his love for Elizabeth outweighed his reasons for not proposing. This proves that he really loves Elizabeth and is proposing solely for reasons of love. Elizabeth's reaction to Darcy's proposal are very useful in analysing her character and looking at her feelings towards Mr. Darcy. Austen writes, 'Elizabeth's astonishment"¦"¦"¦"¦"¦.silent'. This, to me, proves Elizabeth's complete and utter state of disbelief in hearing the beginning of a proposal by Mr. Darcy. This was the last thing in the world she expected. She had assumed a hatred between herself and Mr. Darcy, one which did not feature on his behalf and this will surely influence her decision. Although Mr. Darcy speaks less fluently than Mr. Collins, it is obvious that his speech is coming from the heart. This real love for Elizabeth is the eventual deciding factor in the marriage. Even though Elizabeth is insulted when Mr. Darcy tells her that he is marrying someone of a lower class and he purposely put his friend off marrying Elizabeth's sister, I feel that this is huge evidence of his love for Elizabeth. He accepts the fact that he broke up her sister's marriage yet goes on to say that his love is too strong to do likewise here. Although her anger prevents her from seeing this immediately, it is this which leads her to eventually marrying Mr. Darcy. There are many great differences evident between Mr. Darcy and Mr. Collins. There are a few similarities, however. In both cases, it is definitely a case of unrequited love and Elizabeth is shocked by both proposals. There are more differences though. After being rejected, Mr. Darcy, unlike Mr. Collins keeps his cool and remains gentleman-like in accepting it. As already mentioned, Mr. Darcy speaks more of love than the marriage merely being a business agreement and is reminiscent of modern proposals in terms of intent and purpose. In today's society, marriage is a partnership between equals and done for love but in Austen's society, women had to marry to survive financially and it was usually a business agreement. Social class was also an issue. With Mr. Darcy's case as an exception, you did not usually marry out of your own class. There are many numerous other factors which make marriage today significantly different to that in Austen's society, which have been proven by my analysis of characters in the previous pages.   

Explore the social institution of marriage in Austen"s society in a comparison of the proposals of Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy to Elizabeth Bennett In this essay, I will attempt to answer the above question by going through a number of stages. I will firstly gather a detailed knowledge...

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