Related Keywords

No Related Keywords

Register NowHow It Works Need Essay Need Essay
The Unjust Isolation of Frankenstein's Creation and Other Reasons to Never Become a Model: Societal Prejudices in Shelley's Frankenstein A Swiss Proverb once enlightened, "When one shuts one eye, one does not hear everything". Sadly, vision is the primary sense of mankind and often the solitary basis of judgment. Without human's limitations of the shapes, colors and textures of our overall outward appearances, the world would be a place that emphasizes morals, justice and intelligence rather than bravado, cuteness, and sexual attraction. For if there were no predetermined ideal models defining the beautiful possibilities of the human body's variation, one would never suffer isolation due to one's disability, unattractiveness, or unusual physical attribute. Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein, sheds light on the eternal illusory and importance of appearance through the tale of an unwanted creation that is never given a chance. Ironically, the supposed beast was initially much more compassionate and thoughtful than his creator, until his romantic and innocent view of the human race was diminished by the cruelty and injustice he unduly bore. Not only does the creature suffer the prejudice of an appearance-based society, but other situations and characters in the novel force the reader to reflect their own hasty crimes of judgment in an intelligent and adult fashion. The semi- gothic novel includes several instances of societal prejudice that include the isolation and outcast of Frankenstein's creation, the creature's biased opinion of the cottagers, and the unbalanced and inappropriate classification of Victor. Throughout the course of the creature's isolated and pathetic journey, he is never given the opportunity to participate in human interaction, as he so deeply deserves. Upon his creation, the reaction of Victor, his maker, is so vividly appalling; one forgets that this is actually the birth of a human being. His 'father', Victor, is so selfish and has such a lack of responsibility and foresight, that he creates a human being for the simple purpose of recreation, intellectual stimulation, and the thrill of 'the chase'. Frankenstein himself refers to his own creation as, ""¦the life which I had so thoughtlessly bestowed" 88; ch.1; vol. 2. Victor is solely interested in the beneficial aspects on the surface of creating, just as his interest in the exterior 'monster' is superficial. Not only is Victor's quest selfish, but his goal is frivolous as well. Victor's initial opinion of his creature is that of disappointment, although he succeeds in his destination to create a living being from inanimate pieces. The disappointment is not only irrational, but also shows his further jaded ideal of perfection in the fact that he considers ugliness a weakness. If that were true, ugliness would be the creature's only weakness, as the story goes on to tell of the selfless acts of kindness the creature administers. Victor describes his supposed miserable failure as a deformed monster when he says "His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of lustrous black, and flowing his teeth of pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only form a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun-white sockets in which they were set, his shriveled complexion and straight black lips" 56; ch.5; vol.1. Later, Victor sees the creature after a long period of his aimless roaming, and he "trembled with rage and horror" 95; ch. 3; vol .2. Victor wished to engage in mortal combat because he had a faint premonition the creature might have possibly killed his son. The senseless idea was formed simply because of the creature's physical features, and that he may have been in the vicinity. Even though the monster was shunned, hated, labeled prematurely as a killer, and cursed by his very own maker, he sees the goodness of the human heart and desires to learn more about the human race. As the supposed monster journeys onward, he is delighted and allured by the moon and sun, and other peaceful, natural and romantic settings. He describes a community as, "miraculous" 102; ch. 3; vol. 2, and sacrifices his own hunger by refusing to steal from poverty-stricken cottagers. Contrary to the creature's serene emotions, the villagers react in an absurd frenzy: "the children shrieked, and one of the women fainted" 102; ch. 3; vol. 2. The creature's deformity even took a profound effect on his own state of mind. The creature reflects, " Alas! I did not entirely know the fatal effects of this miserable infirmity" 110; ch. 4; vol. 2, and ponders, "Was I, then, a monster, a blot upon the earth, from which all men fled and whom all woman disowned?" 117; ch. 5; vol. 2. The reader wonders if the creature has fell into the unfeeling void of prejudice and believes he is an outsider to mankind that deserves his bleak fate. Finally upon hearing the creature's story Victor expresses a hint of pity for the creature, "I compassioned him and sometimes felt a wish to console him"¦" 142; ch. 9; vol. 2, although Victor goes on to say, " But when I saw the filthy mass that moved and talked, my heart sickened and my feelings were altered to those of horror and hatred" 142; ch. 9; vol. 2. At the conclusion of the novel, Victor refuses to create another, and end the creature's miserable asylum due to the simple belief that beasts cannot nor should live peacefully in the comfort of love and kinship. The cottagers also display a contrast of truth and appearance. The creature almost falls in love with the family from a distance. He thinks they exude natural innocence and kinship by simply viewing them from afar. Without actually interacting physically or emotionally with the group, the monster incessantly passes discernment while safely camouflaging himself in the background and daydreaming. Although the monster notices the differences of age and varying body forms, he nonetheless gives the cottagers decent and moral roles with no intelligent basis. The creature remarks, "One was old, with silver hairs and a countenance beaming with benevolence and love: the younger was slight and graceful in his figure, and his features were molded in the finest symmetry" 105; ch. 3; vol. 2. Merely due to the disparity of the creatures physical attributes and the cottagers, the creature looks upon them as, "superior beings" 111; ch. 3; vol. 2, and believes "that they would be disgusted by my gentle demeanour and conciliating words " Satirically, the gentle and soothing words of the cottagers would be natural and fitting, as the 'monster's' appears repelling. Alas, the creature discovers the true souls of these treasured humans whom he has so greatly bestowed the hope of equality. When the younger cottagers invade the comrades' peaceful discussion, their horror and consternation is indescribable to the articulate being. The blind man slightly penetrates the inhibitions of appearance when he says, "there is something in your words which persuades me that you are sincere" 130; ch. 7; vol. 2. Although even he falters the evil test of true equipollence when he utters, "I am blind and cannot judge of your countenance" If the blind man only knew the error of his words, the creature may have found a true home. The untimely assessment of Victor as an inoffensive and harmless existence symbolizes the generous leniency one gives to another that through appearance is viewed as a reflection of oneself. Victor has several nervous breakdowns and becomes reclusive at times. His unusual behavior goes unnoticed by his family and friends due to his seemingly safe and passive physical stature. Victor reflects on the grievances of his beloved Elizabeth and father. He sheds light on the disagreement between his image of innocence and the true broken shell of a man he inhabits: "Frankenstein, your son, your kinsman, your early, much-loved friend; he who would spend each vital drop of blood for your sakes- who has no thought nor sense of joy, except as it is mirrored also in your dear countenance" 86; ch. 8; vol. 1. After several episodes of intense worry and emotional drain, Victor descends into another world of physical and emotional pain that proceeds to affect the emotional states of his family and friends. Victor's guilt is expressed when he says, "My father's care and attentions were indefatigable; but he did not know the origin of my sufferings" 179; ch. 5; vol. 3. Even when Victor avoids society and is in a state of utter despair, his father refuses to acknowledge that this normal, pleasing-looking, blood-related, and seemingly sane human is indirectly responsible for such horrendous acts of malice. Victor, like his creation, was the victim of hasty opinions regarding the nature of their personal inner countenances. The semi- gothic novel includes several instances of societal prejudice that include the isolation and outcast of Frankenstein's creation, the creature's biased opinion of the cottagers, and the unbalanced and inappropriate classification of Victor. The universal quest for acceptance has led many humans to irrevocable and indecent acts. No one truly desires for their own brethren to lead a life of eternal heartache and hardship, yet we allow it to happen everyday. The simple meaninglessness of a person's appearance can cause isolation no human should have to endure. The flashes of airbrushed and plastic beauty that are copied and pasted on every media outlet in today's information age give usually intelligent and morally-intent human beings short attention spans for anything other than our own selfish well-being. For the small duration of time we do think about anything beside ourselves, we are bombarded with pity cases for the specifically cute and child-victims. In the meantime, the not-so-cute and older victims are left to fend for themselves and most human beings go on pretending the confidant and assertiveness that come with knowledge and modern civilization rule society. Meanwhile, people of all ages, sexes, and races continually binge and purge, starve and isolate themselves, and become depressed or angry. We incessantly turn a blind eye to the superfluous suffering of our brothers and sisters, and even condone the labeling of Victor's benevolent 'child' as 'monster'. Had the image-obsessed society paused for one moment to introspect the personality that they feared, a multitude of lives could have been saved.
0 User(s) Rated!
Words: 1721 Views: 255 Comments: 0
The Unjust Isolation of Frankenstein's Creation and Other Reasons to Never Become a Model: Societal Prejudices in Shelley's Frankenstein A Swiss Proverb once enlightened, "When one shuts one eye, one does not hear everything". Sadly, vision is the primary sense of mankind and often the solitary basis of judgment. Without human's limitations of the shapes, colors and textures of our overall outward appearances, the world would be a place that emphasizes morals, justice and intelligence rather than bravado, cuteness, and sexual attraction. For if there were no predetermined ideal models defining the beautiful possibilities of the human body's variation,...
and older victims are left to fend for themselves and most human beings go on pretending the confidant and assertiveness that come with knowledge and modern civilization rule society. Meanwhile, people of all ages, sexes, and races continually binge and purge, starve and isolate themselves, and become depressed or angry. We incessantly turn a blind eye to the superfluous suffering of our brothers and sisters, and even condone the labeling of Victor's benevolent 'child' as 'monster'. Had the image-obsessed society paused for one moment to introspect the personality that they feared, a multitude of lives could have been saved.
Become A Member Become a member to continue reading this essay orLoginLogin
View Comments Add Comment

Petrarch once enlightened, "Rarely do great...Petrarch once enlightened, "Rarely do great beauty and great virtue dwell together." Unfortunately, sight is the main sense of mankind which is why many people in the world are judgmental and can't see pass the outside shell of people. Without man's idealistic limitations of colors and shapes of a person's outside appearance, the world would be more virtuous rather than the cesspool it is becoming as time progresses. It would not idolize sexual attraction, cuteness, and conceit like it does now. If there were no set ideal characteristics about the outside appearance a person has to have, then there probably would not be as much separation and isolation due to ugliness, disability, or an awkward physical characteristic. There are people however that love the direction the world is going, these people make decisions everyday about how they are going to judge and treat people. They decide whether or not they approve or reject the way the person acts and exudes their way of life. A perfect example of this can be seen in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, when the reader first meets the creature and sees how he is the ugliest character of the novel on the outside but ironically, the creature was much more likeable and decent than his creator, until his view of man had vanished by the hatred and injustice served to him. So many different themes can be addressed by this prompt but the ones that stick out are Nature vs. Nurture between the creator and the created and how appearances are not everything. During the creature's lonely journey, he is never given the chance to engage in any conversation except with Victor. During the creature's creation, the reaction of Victor, his "dad", is so dreadful. This reaction actually makes the reader forget that it is the birth of a human being which is seen to be one of the most precious occurrences in the life. This is why the theme Nature vs. Nurture sticks out to the reader because one would think that Victor should have a paternal bond to the creature. This bond is further expected not only because of the time and effort put into the creature but also the fact that it is an extension of his mind. "The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature. I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had finished, the beauty of a dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room, and continued a longtime traversing my bedchamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep." Shelley, 43, this quote demonstrates how even though Victor spent extensive time and effort on the monster, human nature took over and told Victor that he should loathe his monstrous creation because it is ugly and unwanted rather than nurture and take care of something he produced and assembled. Victor judged the monster before he got a chance to talk to it and find that it was only ugly on the outside but possessed beautiful attributes on the inside which the reader later finds out. Victor's disgust is further shown in the quote "Mingled with this horror, I felt the bitterness of disappointment; dreams that had been my food and pleasant rest for so long a space were now become a hell to me; and the change was so rapid, the overthrow so complete!" Shelley, 44, this quote oozes with the true feelings of loathe that Victor feels towards his repulsive mistake ""¦the life which I had so thoughtlessly bestowed" Shelley, 81. Victor describes his miserable disappointment as a misshapen monster when he says "His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of lustrous black, and flowing his teeth of pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only form a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun-white sockets in which they were set, his shriveled complexion and straight black lips" Shelley, 43. Later in the novel Victor sees the creature after a long time of his roaming around without a clue, and he "trembled with rage and horror" Shelley, 86. Victor wants to fight the monster because he has a feeling that creature might have killed William. This idea was first formed because of the creature's appearance and that he was close to the scene of the crime. Later the reader finds out however that this suspicion is true. Later in the creature starts to see the goodness of the human heart and desires to learn more about man. As the creature's journey progresses, he is fascinated by the moon and sun, and the other peaceful, serene settings of nature. He describes a community as, "miraculous" Shelley, 102, and then the creature sacrifices his own hunger by refusing to steal from poor people who live in a cottage. Oddly enough after the creature's courtesy, the villagers react in an unpleasant manner because of his appearance as read in the quote "the children shrieked, and one of the woman fainted" Shelley, 97. At this point the creature's appearance starts to take a toll on his state of mind. The creature reflects, "Alas! I did not entirely know the fatal effects of this miserable infirmity" Shelley, 100 and then it thinks, "Was I, then, a monster, a blot upon the earth, from which all men fled and whom all woman disowned?" Shelley, 108. These quotes make the reader wonder if the creature has started to believe the judgments and that he is an outsider to man and he deserves to wander around alone. The people who live in the cottage also display a contrast of truth and appearance. The creature almost falls in love with the poor family from a distance. He believes that they show a kind of natural innocence and bond by observing them from a distance. He starts to get a feeling of family. Although the creature notices the differences of age and body forms, he strangely gives them moral roles without judging them. The creature says, "One was old, with silver hairs and a countenance beaming with benevolence and love: the younger was slight and graceful in his figure, and his features were molded in the finest symmetry" Shelley, 105. The funny thing is that the blind man slightly readdresses the theme of appearance when he says, "there is something in your words which persuades me that you are sincere" Shelley, 130. Although even the old man contradicts the evil test of true balance when he utters, "I am blind and cannot judge of your countenance" If the blind man only knew the error of these words, the creature may have found a true home there. This romantic novel includes several instances of how appearances are not everything and this includes but is not limited to the isolation of Victor's creation, the creature's partial view of the De Laceys, and the horrible judgment of Victor. The actions of the monster demonstrate to the reader of how the quest for acceptance in life leads many good people over the edge and gives them the drive to do indecent and cruel acts. No one truly wants to be the reason many people to lead a life of hardship, yet society still lets this action happen today. The true message that needs to go across the reader of this paper's mind is that the simple meaningless of something as stupid as someone's appearance can cause isolation which is something nothing should have to suffer. It is an atrocious habit for man to go on in life carefree knowing that they hurt someone. Just think that if the appearance-obsessed society paused for one minute to look at the personality of what they feared, a lot of lives may have been saved.   

Petrarch once enlightened, "Rarely do great beauty and great virtue dwell together." Unfortunately, sight is the main sense of mankind which is why many people in the world are judgmental and can't see pass the outside shell of people. Without man's idealistic limitations of colors and shapes of a person's...

Words: 1347 View(s): 198 Comment(s): 0
Accordion Crimes is a difficult book...Accordion Crimes is a difficult book to place in a single time period because the story takes place over about 100 years, originating in a small Sicilian village, but the main setting and focus is the United States. The various settings introduced in the book influenced the characters in various ways, but one instance of influence was great enough to cause his death. The accordion maker was literally ruled over by his setting. The setting around him was one of oppression that worked against him because he was Sicilian. ""¦ The accordion maker saw the approaching men with searing clarity, the loose thread on a coat, mud-spattered trouser legs, a logging chain in a big hand, the red shine of the engorged faces, a man with one blue eye and one yellow eye. Even then he hoped to be saved. He was innocent! Pinse held his revolver loosely in his hand, had lost his staff in the rush up the stairs, so crowded it had been, looked at the Sicilians knotted in the corner, their wicked eyes glittering, some of them pleading and praying - the cowards! He thought of the rat king, fired. Others fired. A barrage of bullets and shot of every caliber and weight tore the Sicilians. The accordion maker reared twice and fell back." A character that has a great deal of intrigue is the accordion maker. The most interesting fact of this character is that he has no name, only an occupation. This is symbolic of all the millions of faceless immigrants that came to America in search of their dreams, but very few found them waiting, much less at all. "...He had his theory, his idea of the fine instrument; with the proof of this one, he planned to make his fortune in La Merica." The accordion maker himself was a large man, but more sensitive that most like him. He despised working through problems and simply let his wife handle them when she could. Once in La Merica, the accordion maker had to deal with squalid living conditions, but when one man wanted an accordion like the one he had made for himself, the accordion maker readily agreed. Despite that squalid living conditions, the accordion maker still had high hopes, "... He was fortunate to have the room - many slept in the streets and docks and every morning lifeless forms were carried away, throats slit and pockets turned inside out, even young children. All around him were men who had to piss in their nettles." The accordion maker is a sort of introduction to the rest of the characters in the story in that they all live lower-middle to lower class lifestyles, with barely any income, and one finds that there is no epiphany or catharsis for the character, sometimes simply because you have the feeling he is ignorant of the truth, other times he dies before any resolution can be reached. One must remember that Accordion Crimes is a group of short stories that are bound together by an old accordion, with no character overlapping into two stories. The plot of Accordion Crimes is a difficult one to describe as it is rather a collection of short stories and there is only one thing constant in every story, which is the accordion. Therefore, I have decided to write not of the overlying story, but of the journey of the accordion. The story begins with a Sicilian accordion maker and his dream of making a fortune in La Merica. All he had is a green, two-row button accordion and some money. He takes his son, Silvano, with him so that there might be enough money for them to eat decently. The accordion maker ends up in the worst of conditions along with having his pockets as good as empty, almost makes some money by selling an accordion, but is killed with 10 other innocent Italians by a lynch mob, and the accordion is stolen by a black dockworker who goes down the Mississippi and sells the accordion to a Mr. Smith who owns a lumber shop in North Dakota for some food money. The accordion is bought from the now late Mr. Smith by Hans Beutle, who, along with Ludwig Messermacher and William Loats, founded the town of Prank with their farms. Soon after, their children began to grow up and some married and some changed their names because of the difficulty of having a foreign name. The town prospered and Beutle took his money and bought a better accordion and gave the old two-row to Messermacher, but not before half of their families died of infinite causes ranging from mysterious diseases to rape to insanity to catching parachuting Japanese bombs to having goat glands transplanted so as to increase libido at around age 60 Hans Beutle's fate. Messermacher puts the accordion in the bottom of a trunk and moves to Coma, Texas to grow cotton after losing everything in the stock market crash. Soon, the accordion makes its way to a barber shop window where it is bought by a young Mexican boy named Abelardo who goes on to have four children, three of which learn to play the accordion, while the fourth died at war. The daughter, Felida, ran away from home at 17 and became one of the best folk accordionists ever. Chris loved to play the accordion but was killed in a courtroom by a furious father-in-law after being arrested for dope smuggling. Years preceding his death, Abelardo hid 12 thousand dollars inside the accordion. Abelardo died of a spider bite that made him delirious and he played like a madman on the accordion for the last 20 seconds of his life. Baby came to own the green accordion, but left it on the floor of a cab and couldn't remember anything about the cab. The accordion was found by a man named Charles Gagnon who was abandoned during his childhood and grew up in an orphanage. After some time in the service, he returned to his hometown of Random. Not finding anything of his parents he meets an old friend from the orphanage, Wilf. He eventually gets a house and makes a three man band with Wilf and his wife, Emma, whom Charles secretly lusts after. One day, Charles mysteriously looses all use of his legs a couple months after Wilf died in a horrendous truck accident. At a wedding that Emma gets Charles to go to, he meets Delphine, who takes him to a statue of St. Jude in the middle of nowhere that supposedly has healing powers. Almost immediately, Charles is returned the use of his legs, and after careful consideration, kills himself, and his accordion is sold to a place called The Little Boy Blue Pawnshop to pay for the gravemarker with his name and lifespan that is destroyed in a plane crash 10 years later. The accordion is then bought by Ivar Gasmann who collects antiques and has a little store in a town called Old Glory where he puts it for sale. Dick Cude buys the accordion for the daughter of Conrad Gasmann, Ivar's brother. The daughter's name is Vela and had the unfortunate accident of having her arms severed just below the elbow by a flying piece of sheet metal, and after she comes home, finds solace in Lawrence Welk for a while. After receiving the Accordion and the hundred or so tapes that Dick had, she is mortified and hates them all, and so they are thrown away, accordion and all. The accordion is rescued from the dump truck by the drivers, who end up pitching it out the window anyway, and the accordion is then found by some kids who pull out one of the thousand dollar bills, are tricked into thinking it is a one dollar bill by the old lady at the soda/gas stand, and buy a few sodas with it. The Accordion Crimes was a fantastic book and I enjoyed reading it immensely because of the detail and amount of pictorial usage used all throughout the novel. Although there were only words in the book, at some points it was almost as if I was looking through a small mirror to the world in which all these things took place. I was also thoroughly impressed at the style Proulx uses in describing the disasters that befall the characters, as if they aren't important. There were times that I had to double check a page to see if a certain character actually did die, which brings us to where I believed the book was lacking. I sometimes had the feeling that everything had been said and done, but the truth of the action was still in the obscured mind of the author, and I could not comprehend what was going on. I must admit though, that this in its entirety did actually add to the novel as the whole entire story wasn't told by the author. A good deal of it is written by the reader. Another criticization of the book would easily be about the gloom of the entire thing. "Many stories about immigrants in the 20th century tend to be uplifting, but not Proulx's. If one may criticize Accordion Crimes ever so milidly, it is only for its relentless existential bleakness." Theme was an element that the book seemed to lack as a whole, unless you consider possibly that the accordion represents how we have no control over our lives, but how other people react to us decides our path.   

Accordion Crimes is a difficult book to place in a single time period because the story takes place over about 100 years, originating in a small Sicilian village, but the main setting and focus is the United States. The various settings introduced in the book influenced the characters in various...

Words: 1599 View(s): 105 Comment(s): 0
One Day in the Life of...One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Book Report Setting This book explains a single day in Ivan Denisovichs live in a Siberian prison camp. The story is taking place during Joseph Stalin's Red Terror program between 1945 and 1953. But I think this specific day is in no case different from any other ones of his possible 25 year prison term. Major Characters Ivan Denisovich Shukhov: The main character of the story, Ivan Denisovich is in the eighth year of a ten-year prison term. Imprisoned unjustly during WWII for treason, he has learned over the years not to be bitter, but live every day for itself. He is the consummate prisoner, with the know-how and optimistic attitude to get through the tortuous days. The story follows one day of his life in a Siberian labor camp, from the moment he wakes up to the moment he goes to bed. Fetiukov: A former office worker of some rank overseer, he is considered the lowest rank in the 104th hierarchy. No one in his squad respects Fetiukov because he is one to "lick others" leftovers. He scrounges for anything he can get, not concerned about maintaining any degree of dignity and self-control. In the mess hall, Fetiukov often gets beaten up during fights over leftovers. Alyosha: Ivan Denisovich"s top bunk neighbor, Alyosha is deeply religious and spends most of his time praying and reading the bible he has kept hidden in a chink in the wall. Alyosha is content with prison life because it gives him time to think about God and about his soul. Ivan Denisovich respects Alyosha because he works hard, serves everyone, and does not engage in the dubious survival tactics of the other prisoners. Before the prisoners go to sleep, Alyosha shares his faith with Ivan Denisovich. Tiurin: The squad leader of Ivan Denisovich"s 104th division. As a nineteen-year veteran of the prisons, Tiurin is an adept and respected leader who understands how to manipulate the prison system. Having known Ivan Denisovich since their days at Ust-Izhma, Tiurin personally picks him to join his squad when they transfer to their current camp. Tiurin was arrested for being a son of a kulak. Captain Buinovsky : Ivan Denisovich"s bottom bunk neighbor prisoner S 311, he is a former naval captain who acts as though he is still a captain. Despite being imprisoned unfairly, he remains patriotic to the Communist authorities and genuinely believes in the Soviet regime. He is a relative newcomer to the camp. During the morning inspection, Buinovsky gets ten days in the guardhouse for speaking out against Lieutenant Volkvoi. Ivan Denisovich feels sorry for the captain because with his brash attitude, he will not survive the camp for long. Plot The story describes each event Ivan's life, as he tries to survive one more day in the horrors of a Soviet labor camp in the 1950s. Unordinary seems to be ordinary. By using each specific detail, he enables the reader to get a reliable visual picture. It's a review of a day in a prison camp. And especially orders play an important rule in a prisoners life. It begins with "'Sleep's over' " pg. 37, after that "the escort began shouting: ' Get a move on ! ' pg. 41". The prisoners must work "11 hours" inside a power station, "slapping in some ["¦] mortar" pg. 95. This punishment is being interrupted by "magara ["¦] that damned 'Chinese' oatmeal " pg. 29. Finally in the evening the prisoner must "bear in the icy wind" pg. 123, while the guards are looking for a Moldavian Fugitive. At the end some couple of hours remain until 22:00 for the prisoners own life. The plot of this short novel is stunningly simple: The reader follows Ivan's life, as he tries to survive one more day in the horrors of a Soviet labor camp in the 1950s. The simple, unadorned style, however, only amplifies the horror of life reduced to its most essential elements"”finding food and staying alive. Underneath the insanity, cruelty, and oppression of this inhumane system lies the supreme dignity of a human being who refuses to be dehumanized Compare and contrast the protagonist and antagonist Shukhov, alias Ivan Denisovich is the protagonist in the book. He is instructing his squad 104th and serving as a squad leader. "Shukhov know how to manage anything. When you worked for the knowing you gave them quality, ["¦] else an eyewash " pg. 26. And " That's what a squad leader is. A guard can't get people to ["¦] work ["¦], but a squad leader can tell his men to get on with the job, ["¦] and they'll do it. Because he's the one who feeds them." pg. 90. That's why Shukhov, but essentially for the benefits of his people, represents the man who gives orders and pushes his squad. Because their survival depends on Shukovs ability that their work is being honored in order to get enough food etc. Main conflict Protagonist: Ivan Denisovich is the main character of the novel. He and the other prisoners in the camp are treated very badly. Ivan tries to make himself warm and to get enough food to keep himself alive. He does only what is necessary to please the guards and the commanders of the camp. Ivan uses his intelligence to make his life easier so he can save up more energy to face the work load. He and the members of the 104th group manage to survive because of Ivan"s personal attention to himself and his care about the others. More importantly, Ivan survives because his intelligence, his spirit, his deception and careful teamwork. Antagonist The antagonist can be said to be the rough every day life. Solzhenitsyn goes through one of Ivan's life, in a four hour journey he witnesses that Ivan's life was endangered at all times. He also sees how hard he has to work to get extra rations of food. Climax Because Ivan work so hard at the power plant in a freezing weather getting to the guardroom late, Ivan realizes he still had pieces of metal in his coat which makes him go through a true crisis, a fear that he would get caught. But fortunately when Chief Warden calls for the search to be ended right before the guard searched Ivan's mitten. He thanks God that he didn't got discovered because that will mean solitary confinement, which is equal to death. Outcome Ivan must have a strong spirit to survive in the camp, he uses his spirit to make himself feel better in the camp, so, he can live happier and longer. He always thinks about the future, which make an outcome for himself. Without an outcome a person may become very sad and may not want to do anything, so he actually make himself live longer. For example, "Freedom meant one thing to him - home" Solzhenitsyn, Pg.140. He is still thinking of home which he thinks that he still have hope to get out of the camp. so he wants to save his own life and go home in order to have freedom. Also, in his mind, work is not for money, but for satisfaction. So, he does not think that work is boring and hard to do, he thinks that they are challenges.  

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Book Report Setting This book explains a single day in Ivan Denisovichs live in a Siberian prison camp. The story is taking place during Joseph Stalin's Red Terror program between 1945 and 1953. But I think this specific day is in no...

Words: 1227 View(s): 136 Comment(s): 0