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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither of them will listen to the other, because their hearts are filled with intense prejudice. Some people would think the play itself was a racist. The reader might not want to portray the play to others, because of the villainous character of Shylock. The reader doesn't realize the Christians portrayal was just as bad as the Jewish man, Shylock's portrayal. The play teaches the reader about prejudice, why it is wrong. People would see how everyone was hurt at one time or another by a prejudice, whether it was the Christians mocking and making fun of Shylock or Shylock showing his prejudice to the Christians. This is first noticed in Act one when Shylock is openly saying to himself, "I hate him for he is a Christian....Curs'd be my tribe if I forgive him!" I, 3, 37-I, 3, 46-47. Antonio proves he is unwilling to change his prejudice feelings towards Shylock when he says, "I am as like to call thee so again, To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too." I, 3, 125-126 They do not realize their prejudiced attitudes and actions are portraying an ugly message to the reader and the reader is thinking, this is not suitable for younger children. Their messages could get themselves killed, which in fact comes very close to happening. This is a bad message that is portrayed to the reader. There is a motif of revenge in the play The Merchant Of Venice which also stuns the reader. Shylock has great hatred for Antonio, and his intent is getting revenge for all the things he assumes Antonio has done and said to him. "He hath disgraced me, and hindered me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies"”and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, What should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, Revenge!". III, 1, 49-59 This clearly explains the intent of Shylock, the man who is mocked by the Christians. He wants revenge, and this is driving him too far. The readers will not like the motif that is presented by Shakespeare. They will want this play banned from school and will not want to show their children. The desire of revenge is almost inseparable. This play provides a point of view in which racism can grow and become only a bigger problem. It will teach the reader to hate another race and racial discrimination will only grow and grow. There are a lot of racial comments in this play, and could indeed have an effect on the reader and also influence them in the wrong way. There is a lot of racism, especially between Shylock and Antonio. They both hate each other immensely and all throughout the play they are both snapping back and forth at each other. The other is probably hurt from what the other is saying, but they are not showing it. There is racist comment that is 'a Negro's belly', which is censored in the newer versions of The Merchant Of Venice. This is a fact in the play that racism is occurring and this could have an effect on the society. This is a reason why the school boards might want to take this play out of the curriculum. As you can see, there are many reasons The Merchant Of Venice should not be taught in classrooms. Although there are many reasons, The Merchant Of Venice is an excellent play and it should not be removed from the classroom. A. Whitney Griswold said in a speech, "Books won't stay banned. They won't burn. Ideas won't go to jail. In the long run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure weapon against bad ideas is better ideas." This quote here, by A. Whitney Griswold, clearly states the bad idea of racism in the play should be viewed by a positive view of anti-racism and showing how wrong the racism is. Also, if the play were to be banned, why hasn't it been banned yet? If the play were to be banned because of the character and portrayal of Shylock, this would be wrong, because the Christians portrayal was just as bad as Shylock's. They ended up taking away his religion from him and the punishment that was given to him was even more severe than the one he had intended. If the play were to be banned, they would have to look at both sides of the arguments. Most readers are missing out on the point of Shylock's. He is a human and he has feelings as well. After a discussion, it is concluded that The Merchant Of Venice should not be banned by the school authorities. This is an excellent play to be taught, and the problem of racism everybody is facing today. This play should be taught properly by a teacher, who can explain the play's meaning, so the students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither...
students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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The author of Dispensing With the...The author of Dispensing With the Truth, Alicia Mundy, is the Washington bureau chief for Mediaweek and a contributing editor at Washingtonian magazine. She has written for U.S. News & World Report, GQ, Philadelphia Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. She is best known for her investigative report which originally broke the 1992 scandal revealing that top United Way executives were stealing money from the organization"s accounts Brown, 2001. Alicia Mundy is the winner of several journalism awards for commentary and investigative reporting. She currently lives in Alexandria, Virginia. Dispensing With the Truth began as an article assigned by Glamour magazine, but was ultimately published in U.S. News and World Report Brown, 2001. Dispensing With the Truth is nearly 400 pages citing legal documents, studies, corporate e-mails, depositions and interviews. Author Alicia Mundy painstakingly proves that the pharmaceutical company Wyeth-Ayerst knew that its fen-phen diet pills, including the drugs Pondimin and Redux were dangerous. Even with this knowledge, they kept them on the market anyway. This book tells what the drug companies really knew about its drugs and the ways it kept this information from the public, doctors, and the FDA. Dispensing With the Truth goes on to describe and the massive legal battles that occurred as the victims and their attorneys searched for the truth. Wyeth-Ayerst's parent company, American Home Products, was the target of one of the largest and most successful tort lawsuits in American history. Alicia Mundy writes about corporate greed and puts a harsh spotlight on the FDA officials who were asleep at the switch. Presently nearly a third of the millions of fen-phen users will ultimately suffer some degree of heart and lung damage from these drugs Goodman, 2000. Throughout the book Alicia Mundy sheds light on the inner workings of the pharmaceutical companies and how the fen-phen tragedy unfolded. The cast of characters is long and involved starting with the victims, their families, and the lawyers of the victims who put the drug companies and their practices on trial. The drug companies: American Home Products, parent company of Wyeth-Ayerst, Fisons, and Interneuron, the company's officials, and the lawyers for the drug companies who repeatedly tried to distort the truth. The FDA officials who were caught in the middle of trying to appease the drug companies and protect the consumer and finally the judges and jurors in the trials all have a voice in this book. It all began with Mary Linnen and her tragic, yet preventable death. In 1996, Mary Linnen was an average-sized girl. She was always healthy, but she wanted to lose a few pounds before her wedding day. What she didn't know was that a diet craze "” a popular diet drug called fen-phen "” wouldn't lead her to a slimmer waist, instead it would lead her to die in the arms of her fiancé, months before her wedding day Mundy, 2000. Consumers beware! Dispensing With the Truth is an inside look at the drug companies' main motivation"¦money. Fen Phen was approved in 1996 despite noted concerns about safety. American Home Products made the "fen" in fen-phen, a drug called fenfluramine. It sold the drug under the brand name Pondimin along with a chemical cousin called Redux Doctor's Guide, 1998. The drug companies worked against the FDA, the one agency in place to regulate the safety of their products. These pills were targeted to specific a consumer. The drug companies counted on "pink collar" women, who were not truly obese, or old, just wanting to lose 20 or so odd pounds. The companies carefully orchestrated a diet drug fad that made them hundreds of millions of dollars. When reports started flooding in about serious side effects of the drugs these companies consistently downplayed the warnings. Instead the companies chose to fight the recommendations of the FDA to include "black box" warnings, which would put clear labeling alerting consumers and doctors to possible risks. They also hired experts and conducted studies to try to prove their product safe. Ultimately American Home Products pulled Pondimin and Redux off the market in 1997 after a Mayo Clinic study linked fenfluramine to potentially fatal heart valve damage and pulmonary hypertension Doctor's Guide, 1998. American Home Products began a nearly $100 million public relations spin in order to ward off paying damages and risking punishment by the government. During the summer of 2000, American Home Products agreed to settle the major class action lawsuit pending against the company for approximately $12 billion. Individuals harmed by fen-phen will receive between $5,000 and $1.5 million each, depending on the severity of their fen-phen related injuries. The company expects thousands of claimants to come forward over the next several months Injuryboard, 2001. The information in this book was well documented. Mundy relied on documents from the FDA, Wyeth-Ayerst, American Home Family, Servier and Interneuron. Other information was gained at the depositions of the drug company officials and during trial testimony. Close contact with the victims, their families, and the lawyers who waged the war against the Goliath drug companies added a human element to the book. She also drew from news stories in The Wall Street Journal and reports in Newsday. The American Journal of Medicine, The New England Journal of Medicine, and Obesity Research were also listed as sources Mundy, 2001. Concern was raised after fen-phen users started to become ill. That fact that this tragedy has unfolded over the last five years is proof to the accuracy and relevance contained in this book. Personally this book has opened my eyes to the deception that is out there. I've learned that I need to be skeptical of products released onto the market. Claims that sound too good to be true probably are, and I should be wary of risking my health. Personal research into claims given by a product could be done easily over the Internet or by asking for a second or third opinion from a physician.   

The author of Dispensing With the Truth, Alicia Mundy, is the Washington bureau chief for Mediaweek and a contributing editor at Washingtonian magazine. She has written for U.S. News & World Report, GQ, Philadelphia Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. She is best known for her investigative...

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To His Coy Mistress Metaphysical poetry...To His Coy Mistress Metaphysical poetry was originally a style of poetry to describe the poet John Donne"s work, but then later extended to a school of 17th century poets. The verse deals with the use of philosophy to explain the human drama in the universe. Their poetic style and method is what linked the poets together. Here, the poets Andrew Marvell, who wrote "To His Coy Mistress", George Herbert who wrote "Love" and John Donne who wrote "The Sun Rising" all fit into the metaphysical grouping. All the poems include an argument within themselves. The poem "To His Coy Mistress" is structured within a syllogistic framework - which begins with an initial premise, then introduces a qualification to the premise, and ends with a resolution to the conflict. In addition, Marvell manages to marry a syllogistic framework with a passionate poem of seduction. He firstly argues that if the couple had all the time in the world, he would woo his lady so slowly her coyness would be irrelevant. "Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime." He proceeds to outline what he would do out of love for his lady if they were both to live for much longer, mentioning such lengths of time as centuries and ages. Throughout this initial premise of "if", he uses esoteric imagery to illustrate his argument. For example, he describes his life as a "vegetable" love, which not only gives connotations of a slow, developing love to grow for his "mistress", but also the description of a "vegetable soul." The vegetable soul is the lowest level of the soul in the Renaissance concept in the levels of reason. Therefore, this suggests a kind of love that could exist without sensual enjoyment and suggests, by its association with the vegetable soul, that it is a lower form of love than sexual love. This is because the middle soul - the "sensible soul" "“ deals with passion and love. This use of metaphysical conceit is common in all the poems, and Marvell"s technique of drawing upon philosophy to illustrate his argument gives the poem an intellectual appeal, not just a visual one. There is also complete devotion displayed in this first stage of the argument, namely: "I would Love you ten years before the flood. And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews." Here, this deals with the extremity of his argument. He is prepared to love her ten years before the "flood" presumably Noah"s Ark, and would not be at all insulted if she refused to love him back until the conversion of the Jews, seemingly until the end of time. Once his opinions have been established, he then continues to the second stage of his argument. Beginning with the conjunction of "But" - a word that prepares us for an alternative argument, Marvell"s second stage in his syllogistic framework refutes the initial premise by addressing the concepts of reality. He now asserts that time is an issue, having already established that if it wasn"t, his method of seduction would be different. By firstly shifting to the present tense, which creates a sense of immediacy, he then uses more stylistic devices to convey the sense of urgency that is necessary when he is discussing the lack of time that the couple possess. For example, he firstly describes the "winged chariot" that is "hurrying near." The winged chariot metaphor gives the reader connotations of a fast and furious speed, which is then neatly juxtaposed with the "Deserts of vast eternity" "“ which gives an atmosphere of a slow, fruitless future. Marvell then has a pronoun switch, which draws the woman directly into the argument and enhances the sense of intimacy, with the intimate form of "you" - "thy." Marvell then uses grim, humorous, phallic imagery to demonstrate how lust will inevitably die, and the consequence of there being no lust in death. "Thy beauty shall no more be found; ....then worms shall try That long-preserved virginity." There is a grim, dark humor present, not only with the phallic imagery of the worms, but also the use of "quaint", which also had a crude, underlying meaning at the time when the poem was written. The third and final stage is the resolution of the argument in the syllogistic framework. Marvell asserts that due to him being unable to love her slowly and realizing that time is precious, he resorts to the logical conclusion of a quickening of affection: "Now let us sport us while we may..." This hurried tone is present throughout the final stage, however Marvell also uses the realities of life to subvert the premise of the first part of the argument. To do so, he uses extremely strong imagery again to conclude his argument with the last part of the argument concentrating on sexual imagery, such as the "amorous birds of prey/Rather at once our time devour" which can also be extended to an image of the couple seizing control of the issue by devouring time and "the iron gates of life". Also, adverb use enhances the intensity of his emotion, such as "Now..", being an imperative - conveying his sense of urgency to the reader, and "Let us" also asserting their mutual, joint enterprise, and "willing" - insinuating a sexual eagerness. The use of metaphysical conceits here make the argument much more than a brief sexual encounter, but a vigorous sexual union where Marvell wishes to defy barriers and the concept of time, which is summed up in a crescendo in lines 45 and 46: "Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run." The last couplet sums up the whole argument - Marvell expresses that although they cannot stop time, they as a couple can control how fast the time goes. This is reminiscent of the carpe diem theme and the poem by Herrick: "Gather ye rosebuds" - celebrating the enjoyment of life and the need to "seize the day." Furthermore, the words "Stand still" can be related back to Joshua in the Old Testament, where he commanded the sun to stand still whilst he did heroic deeds. This is clever, ironic humor, as earlier in the poem he implies the lack of an afterlife, as the woman is destined to lie in the marble vault and only vast deserts implying nothing of eternity lies before them, instead of the spirit being reborn into an eternal life. Marvell also uses the rhyme scheme of the poem to re-emphasize this union of two parts. The entire poem consists of rhyming couplets, which takes two separate lines and make a matching pair out of them. In addition, the concentrated style of the poem and the frequent use of enjambment demonstrate the compression and intensity of Marvell"s argument. Marvell"s uses learned and diverse reference to not only the Bible but also to philosophy, combined with the logical structure unusual for a love ballad, as the structure almost takes on a business-like arrangement, frank emotion and sexuality and humor although still with a light tone. Although the basic argument is a sexual conquest, it also is an assertion of human capability to defy the imperatives of time. All the metaphysical poets have drawn on the same key features of not only using logic and reasoning to explain intense emotions, but also draw upon specialized areas such as law, religion, and philosophy to describe their love, often in conceits "“ an unusual tactic to adopt, which produces a witty and humorous style to many pieces of work in this particular school of poets.   

To His Coy Mistress Metaphysical poetry was originally a style of poetry to describe the poet John Donne"s work, but then later extended to a school of 17th century poets. The verse deals with the use of philosophy to explain the human drama in the universe. Their poetic style and...

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While "Have at thee!" the Arthurian...While "Have at thee!" the Arthurian battle cry from Monty Python's Search for the Holy Grail, is a far a-hem cry from the modern day hero's, the essence remains the same. Many aspects of culture have been wholly altered, but society's quest for a hero has remained. Each people of the ancient times had a matchless idol that was unto his self the embodiment of cultural perfection. In more recent eras, where societies vary exceedingly, people have relied on scores of heroes. The United States is deemed the "melting pot" of the world due to the vast number of cultures she houses. Should she not, then, have a vast number of heroes, each one serving an essential role in society? Though modern culture does not choose one hero to exemplify cultural perfection; instead, there are many, each responding to a different call from each people. Well documented ancient epic heroes include: Beowulf, King Arthur, and Sir Gawain. These legendary men fought to protect their people and their families. The men were the personification of loyalty, courage, and strength. The ancient epic hero usually was deemed cultural perfection; other men idolized these heroes, striving to gain their position of flawlessness. Societies seemed to balance on the tips of heroes' swords; epic poetry and ancient prose read as if heroes were the spinal column of a civilization. And perhaps in an age of heightened supernatural belief it was just so. If ancient times had the supernatural, modern times have their own beasts and monsters to cringe and seek shelter from. In an age where millions are dying from treatable diseases, and a billion more are pointlessly starving, it seems that if ever a need for heroes was, it is now. Modern heroes come in all shapes and sizes, even the anti-government brand. Modern society is crazy about the anti-hero, especially in entertainment. Many protagonists in movies are, in fact, characters that, while they do not embody cultural perfection, they are nonetheless idolized. Consider Rambo, he is strong, courageous, determined"¦ and is being hunted by the police. Unto himself, he is exceptionally heroic, but he is anti-government. In the film Reservoir Dogs, the most heroic character is a for-hire jewel thief, while the most despicable character is a policeman. Mr. Orange, an undercover cop, is shot during the hold-up of a diamond store. Mr. White, the unlawful thief, risks life and limb throughout the entire movie to protect this cop who is trying to put him away. When the surviving members of the thieving crew show up at the rendezvous, yelling and shooting off about there having been a rat, Mr. White stands up for the bleeding, dying cop, saying "You're making a terrible mistake I'm not going to let you make. Joe, if you kill that man you die next." Mr. White takes a bullet for the man who sold him out. In this case, the heroic character was not the upstanding citizen. Mr. White was, however, someone anyone would feel safe calling his or her hero. Anti-heroes do not solely exist in the fictional world. There are people in the real world, everyday who fit the anti-hero description. They are"¦ the Mob. In ancient times loyalty was purest form of respect. It was a way of life. One was loyal to his or her family, govern, king, and God. Hand in hand with loyalty, comes the right to revenge. The Mob is one of the few "societies" that has reserved that tradition. For example: when a family member is assassinated, it is not only the right, but also the duty of the surviving family to avenge that death. This loyalty to one's own, coupled with the fierce determination to protect them, are incredibly heroic qualities. Organized crime families are oohed and ahhed by the press and pop culture, and have their own fans. While these people are not ideal role models, they possess heroic qualities worthy of aspiration. Modern culture does not love only the anti-hero; modern culture loves nearly anything it finds praiseworthy. This encompasses a wide spectrum. At the furthest end from the organized crime, are the "do-gooders". There is even another spectrum, just within this genre of hero. At the far ends of this more specialized spectrum range world-wide figures such as Princess Diana to less known, community heroes. Princess Diana is perhaps the most famous woman in the world; her death is mourned by millions. She is most well known for her campaigns against several social issues including AIDS, poverty, drug-problems, and homelessness. Her work to raise awareness for these issues has put her down in history, and has made her a hero to the world. However, heroes do not have to be world heroes to be classified heroes. For example: "There was the high school football player who gave up his senior season to donate one of his kidneys to save his grandmother. Or even more remarkable, 18-year-old Keisha Thomas, a black girl who threw herself over a white man with a confederate flag shirt who was being beaten at a KKK rally in Ann Arbor." http://www.chronicle.duke.edu/chronicle/1997/04/03/09SearchmngFor.num. These wholly unselfish acts make these people heroes. The ability to put others before oneself is a somewhat rare quality. In an era where everyone seems to have his or her own agenda, to see someone put his or herself on the line for another"¦ is a beautiful thing, something to be admired, and extraordinarily heroic. A person can be a hero to his or her family, or to the world. A jewel thief or a Mob member can be exceptionally heroic. The greatest difference in the hero of today and the hero of times past is the number and social standing. In times past, the hero was cultural perfection; today anyone can be a hero. In that aspect, we have progressed as a civilization. Now there is an ever growing number of heroes that societies can idolize and imitate. With ever more idols, there comes, ideally, a boost in a society's overall goodness. If each individual was encouraged to pick a personal hero, perhaps the world would have fewer problems.   

While "Have at thee!" the Arthurian battle cry from Monty Python's Search for the Holy Grail, is a far a-hem cry from the modern day hero's, the essence remains the same. Many aspects of culture have been wholly altered, but society's quest for a hero has remained. Each people of...

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