Related Keywords

No Related Keywords

Register NowHow It Works Need Essay Need Essay
Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither of them will listen to the other, because their hearts are filled with intense prejudice. Some people would think the play itself was a racist. The reader might not want to portray the play to others, because of the villainous character of Shylock. The reader doesn't realize the Christians portrayal was just as bad as the Jewish man, Shylock's portrayal. The play teaches the reader about prejudice, why it is wrong. People would see how everyone was hurt at one time or another by a prejudice, whether it was the Christians mocking and making fun of Shylock or Shylock showing his prejudice to the Christians. This is first noticed in Act one when Shylock is openly saying to himself, "I hate him for he is a Christian....Curs'd be my tribe if I forgive him!" I, 3, 37-I, 3, 46-47. Antonio proves he is unwilling to change his prejudice feelings towards Shylock when he says, "I am as like to call thee so again, To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too." I, 3, 125-126 They do not realize their prejudiced attitudes and actions are portraying an ugly message to the reader and the reader is thinking, this is not suitable for younger children. Their messages could get themselves killed, which in fact comes very close to happening. This is a bad message that is portrayed to the reader. There is a motif of revenge in the play The Merchant Of Venice which also stuns the reader. Shylock has great hatred for Antonio, and his intent is getting revenge for all the things he assumes Antonio has done and said to him. "He hath disgraced me, and hindered me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies"”and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, What should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, Revenge!". III, 1, 49-59 This clearly explains the intent of Shylock, the man who is mocked by the Christians. He wants revenge, and this is driving him too far. The readers will not like the motif that is presented by Shakespeare. They will want this play banned from school and will not want to show their children. The desire of revenge is almost inseparable. This play provides a point of view in which racism can grow and become only a bigger problem. It will teach the reader to hate another race and racial discrimination will only grow and grow. There are a lot of racial comments in this play, and could indeed have an effect on the reader and also influence them in the wrong way. There is a lot of racism, especially between Shylock and Antonio. They both hate each other immensely and all throughout the play they are both snapping back and forth at each other. The other is probably hurt from what the other is saying, but they are not showing it. There is racist comment that is 'a Negro's belly', which is censored in the newer versions of The Merchant Of Venice. This is a fact in the play that racism is occurring and this could have an effect on the society. This is a reason why the school boards might want to take this play out of the curriculum. As you can see, there are many reasons The Merchant Of Venice should not be taught in classrooms. Although there are many reasons, The Merchant Of Venice is an excellent play and it should not be removed from the classroom. A. Whitney Griswold said in a speech, "Books won't stay banned. They won't burn. Ideas won't go to jail. In the long run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure weapon against bad ideas is better ideas." This quote here, by A. Whitney Griswold, clearly states the bad idea of racism in the play should be viewed by a positive view of anti-racism and showing how wrong the racism is. Also, if the play were to be banned, why hasn't it been banned yet? If the play were to be banned because of the character and portrayal of Shylock, this would be wrong, because the Christians portrayal was just as bad as Shylock's. They ended up taking away his religion from him and the punishment that was given to him was even more severe than the one he had intended. If the play were to be banned, they would have to look at both sides of the arguments. Most readers are missing out on the point of Shylock's. He is a human and he has feelings as well. After a discussion, it is concluded that The Merchant Of Venice should not be banned by the school authorities. This is an excellent play to be taught, and the problem of racism everybody is facing today. This play should be taught properly by a teacher, who can explain the play's meaning, so the students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
0 User(s) Rated!
Words: 1151 Views: 182 Comments: 0
Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither...
students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
Become A Member Become a member to continue reading this essay orLoginLogin
View Comments Add Comment

Character Analysis Captain John Yossarian is...Character Analysis Captain John Yossarian is the main character of Joseph Heller's 1961 satirical war novel, Catch-22. He's a bombardier in the Army Air Corp's 256th bomber squadron and he suffers from an intense fear of death. Catch-22 is a mysterious regulation that traps its victims in a web of circular reason. Basically, if there's a rule then there's always an exception to it. For instance, Catch-22 says that no one is allowed to read Catch-22. It always creates circumstances where, when things look fine, Catch-22 appears and ruins everything. Catch-22 keeps Yossarian in the war because his Colonel continues raising the number of missions he has to fly before he can be rotated Stateside. From the beginning of the book, Yossarian stands out as beeing different from the others, he doesn't care about the war, and he's not interested in risking his life. In addition, his contemporaries think he's insane and they do not understand why he believes that people are trying to kill him. Yossarian is both a member of his squadron and alienated by it Sparknotes. Throughout the novel he carries with him the badge of being different. Though he lives and flies with his fellow airmen, he is constantly identified as an outsider. His Assyrian name strikes people as out of the ordinary because no one's ever heard of it before. For instance, the egomaniacal Colonel Cathcart becomes distressed every time he hears the name. Heller writes: Yossarian─ the very sight of the name made him shudder. There were so many esses in it. It just had to be subversive. It was like the word subversive itself. It was like seditious and insidious too, and like socialist, suspicious, fascist and Communist. It was an odious, alien, distasteful name 220. Adding to Yossarian's difference is the fact that he just doesn't care. He doesn't care about the war, or the enemy, or his "duty," or parades. When he becomes fed up with the war, he simply invents a medical problem such as liver pain, or "seeing everything twice," and retreats into the hospital. He says that, "All he was expected to do in the hospital was to die or get better, and since he was perfectly all right to begin with, getting better was easy. 175" As a result, he spends as much of the war as possible in the hospital. On bombing runs, Yossarian is so petrified by flack, antiaircraft guns, and exploding planes that he devotes all of his attention and energy to avoiding the danger. He's known for making his pilot fly in wild banking, diving, climbing, and rolling maneuvers in order to avoid enemy fire. Heller writes, "Yossarian did not give a damn whether he hit the target or not "¦ just as long as they never had to go back" 130. When his pilot asks, "Yossarian, did the bombs hit the target?" Heller writes, "What bombs?" "Answered Yossarian, whose only concern had been the flak" 367. Yossarian does not risk his life to save others. He says, "I used to get a big kick out of saving people's lives. Now I wonder what the hell's the point, since they all have to die anyway" 89 Through the whole novel his primary goal is to avoid risking his life whenever possible. The system of values around Yossarian is so skewed that this approach seems to be the only truly moral stance he can take, if only because it is so logical. Because Catch-22 makes life so irrational, and asks people to risk their lives for reasons that are utterly unimportant, like "bomb patterns," Yossarian seizes the one truly logical idea, that he should try to preserve life, his own life Sparknotes. Additionally, everyone thinks Yossarian is insane. Catch-22 keeps Yossarian in the war because concern for one's own life proves that he is not really crazy, and to get out of combat a person has to be crazy. When Yossarian is wounded in the leg and interviewed by a psychiatrist, the psychiatrist believes Yossarian to be crazy because the official medical records list him as a soldier named "A. Fortiori," who is in the hospital for a stone in his salivary gland. When Yossarian insists that he is himself and that he has an injured leg, the psychiatrist disagrees, because paperwork is always correct, and labels him insane. "A. Fortiori" is sent home and Yossarian goes back on duty. Ironically, many of the men in Yossarian's squadron are insane, but cannot be removed from duty until they ask, and they never ask because they're crazy. The most distinguishing feature that isolates Yossarian is his unyielding belief that people are trying to kill him. When he explains that thousands of people he's never met before are persistently tying to kill him, people respond that the enemy is trying to kill everyone. It makes no difference to Yossarian, who takes the war personally. He explains, "The enemy "¦ is anybody who"s going to get you killed, no matter which side he"s on, and that includes Colonel Cathcart" 402. Yossarian comes to realize that every time he goes up, his only mission is to come down alive. The war takes on an intensely personal meaning to him, and he becomes almost paranoid about his own impending death Bellmore. He says: There were lymph glands that might do him in. There were kidneys, nerve sheathes and corpuscles. There were tumors of the brain. "¦ There were fertile meadows of epithelial tissue to catch and coddle a cancer cell. There were diseases of the skin; diseases of the bone "¦ there even were diseases of the feet. There were billions of conscientious body cells oxidating away day and night like dumb animals at their complicated job of keeping him alive and healthy, and every one was a potential traitor and foe 206. In the end, Yossarian's insistence on self-preservation forms a conflict within him. Though he has previously decided to keep himself safe at all cost, he still cares deeply for his friends and he's greatly disturbed by their deaths. Throughout the book Yossarian is haunted by the death of an ambiguous man named Snowden who died in Yossarian"s arms on a mission over Avignon. Snowden's chilling death brings Yossarian to the conclusion that life is nothing more than a contest against death and that he should do everything in his power to stay alive as long as possible. However, when Yossarian is finally offered the choice of his own safety at the expense of the rest of his squadron, he is unable to choose himself over his friends. Yossarian's concern for others confuses the straightforward common sense of self-preservation, and creates its own Catch-22: life isn't worth living without a concern for the welfare of others, but a concern for the well being of others endangers one's life Sparknotes. Ultimately, Yossarian is incapable of choosing, and he simple runs away from the war. Because Catch-22 makes all the rules unfair, Yossarian decides that the only reasonable thing to do is not to participate. Works Cited "Catch-22." 2000. 11/01/04 . "Character Analysis." 2000. Sparknotes. 11/08/04 . Heller, Joseph. Catch-22. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster, 1961.   

Character Analysis Captain John Yossarian is the main character of Joseph Heller's 1961 satirical war novel, Catch-22. He's a bombardier in the Army Air Corp's 256th bomber squadron and he suffers from an intense fear of death. Catch-22 is a mysterious regulation that traps its victims in a web of...

Words: 1226 View(s): 119 Comment(s): 0
"The most potent weapon of the..."The most potent weapon of the oppressor is in the mind of the oppressed" "“ Steve Biko Triumph means to be victorious or successful and an adversary is someone you compete against or fight, like an enemy. So to triumph against your adversary is to defeat your enemy. "The Power of One" and "Cry Freedom" are two different stories, written by two different people, but both have the theme "Triumph Against Adversity". Both of the stories were set in South Africa during the times of a white ruled government where black people were considered inferior to white man and were treated so. "The Power of One", written by Bryce Courtney, is about a young boy Peekay who stands up to racism in the white-ruled South Africa of the 1940's. At the young age of five, Peekay was sent to boarding school where he received endless torment from the other kids because he was the only English person there. After years of ill treatment from the leader of the kids, the judge, and his young followers, Peekay finally decided to stand up for himself. This is an example of how Peekay triumphed against his adversaries. After boarding school, at the age of six, Peekay was sent back to live with his family. There he befriended Professor Von Vollensteen Doc, a German man who was a teacher of music. Not long after they met, Doc was arrested by police, suspected of being a German spy. At the court hearing, the Judge declared that Doc be acquitted of all spy charges. However he was charged with being an unregistered alien and the court ordered that he be detained for the duration of the war. He was sent to Barberton Prison where he was one of few white men there. Peekay regularly visited Doc at the prison. It was obvious to Peekay on his first visit to the prison that black people were considered inferior to white people. Because Doc was white, he was treated well and given special privileges that no black man would ever receive. These privileges were also granted because the Kommandmant wanted Doc to play the piano at the bi-annual visit of the inspector of prisons. So to keep Doc happy until the concert, he could do almost as he pleased. Because Doc allowed do his own thing, he had triumphed against his adversary. At Barberton Prison, there was a boxing team that Peekay eagerly joined. This would give him the opportunity to visit Doc more often and to improve his chances of one day becoming welterweight champion of the world. At the prison, all the black people were separated into tribal groups so that there were not any disturbances caused by differences. However, there was one man who did not belong to any one group, he was a mixture of different tribes. This man was Geel Piet. Geel Piet, being the grand master in the art of camouflage, ran the prison black market, supplying tobacco, sugar, salt and cannabis to prisoners. He also knew a lot about boxing. Peekay got to know Geel Piet from his visits with Doc. Geel Piet would be in the hall polishing the floors and when it was safe to do so, he would talk to Peekay and Doc. During Peekay's boxing lessons, Geel Piet would be in the gymnasium polishing the floor or cleaning windows. However, he gradually worked his way up becoming the laundry boy and eventually, when his boxing knowledge was discovered, being given an unofficial boxing job, supervising the kids progress. Geel Piet triumphed against his adversaries when he gained some respect from a few of the prison warders. Lt Borman however, resented the freedom Geel Piet had achieved in the gymnasium under Captain Smit. He constantly made it clear that he thought the freedom of Geel Piet would lead to trouble. But despite his 'warnings', Captain Smit did not dismiss Geel Piet from his boxing duties. On the night of a concert held for the prisoners, Geel Piet was killed. Beaten to death by Lt Borman. While Peekay was visiting the prison, Geel Piet, Mrs Boxall librarian, Doc and Peekay took advantage of Peekay's easy access to the prison and started a letter writing campaign for the black prisoners who couldn't see their families. This proved a big success and eventually, permission was granted by the prison to run the campaign. Mrs Boxall also started the 'Earl of Sandwich Fund' which gained cast-off clothes from people and supplied the black families of the prisoners with clothes. This is an example of how the black prisoners, with the help of Peekay, Doc and Mrs Boxall, triumphed against their adversaries. "Cry Freedom" is a true story about Steve Biko; a black man who was considered a threat as a political activist to the white-ruled government in South Africa during the 1970's. Because of this, he was officially 'banned', prohibited from exercising basic human rights and from publishing his views. Biko became friends with white journalist Donald Woods who, once he had listened to what Biko had to say and saw the living conditions of the black communities, was determined to do something to stop black people from being treated poorly in society. It is because of this that I think Woods is like Peekay from "The Power of One". They both realise that there is a problem in South Africa and decide to take on the injustices of the country. They both help others less fortunate than themselves to overcome their oppressors. Woods endeavoured to spread Biko's message across South Africa, becoming a threat to the government, and was eventually banned by the government's special police. However, this did not stop Biko and Woods from spreading Biko's message across the country and making people aware of the way black people were being treated. Biko was caught breaching his 'ban' and was sent to prison. Not long after, he was killed. However, at the time the government said he had died as a result of a hunger strike. The deaths of both Biko and Geel Piet from "The Power of One" make their characters very similar. Not only because they were both killed by their enemies, but also because they were two characters that had gained respect and friendship from a minority of the 'superior' race including Woods and Peekay, and were well respected by their own people. After Biko's death, Woods and his family escaped from South Africa to England with the help of Father Kani. Father Kani and Mrs Boxall The "Power of One" are alike because they are both background characters who have an influence on the main characters, Woods and Peekay, who are fighting for a 'just' society. In England, Woods published the truth about Biko, so the world was aware of the problems that faced black people in South Africa. Woods triumphed against his adversaries by helping Biko spread his message across the country even when he was banned, and by escaping to England to publish the truth about Biko.   

"The most potent weapon of the oppressor is in the mind of the oppressed" – Steve Biko Triumph means to be victorious or successful and an adversary is someone you compete against or fight, like an enemy. So to triumph against your adversary is to defeat your enemy. "The Power...

Words: 1178 View(s): 144 Comment(s): 0