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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither of them will listen to the other, because their hearts are filled with intense prejudice. Some people would think the play itself was a racist. The reader might not want to portray the play to others, because of the villainous character of Shylock. The reader doesn't realize the Christians portrayal was just as bad as the Jewish man, Shylock's portrayal. The play teaches the reader about prejudice, why it is wrong. People would see how everyone was hurt at one time or another by a prejudice, whether it was the Christians mocking and making fun of Shylock or Shylock showing his prejudice to the Christians. This is first noticed in Act one when Shylock is openly saying to himself, "I hate him for he is a Christian....Curs'd be my tribe if I forgive him!" I, 3, 37-I, 3, 46-47. Antonio proves he is unwilling to change his prejudice feelings towards Shylock when he says, "I am as like to call thee so again, To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too." I, 3, 125-126 They do not realize their prejudiced attitudes and actions are portraying an ugly message to the reader and the reader is thinking, this is not suitable for younger children. Their messages could get themselves killed, which in fact comes very close to happening. This is a bad message that is portrayed to the reader. There is a motif of revenge in the play The Merchant Of Venice which also stuns the reader. Shylock has great hatred for Antonio, and his intent is getting revenge for all the things he assumes Antonio has done and said to him. "He hath disgraced me, and hindered me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies"”and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, What should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, Revenge!". III, 1, 49-59 This clearly explains the intent of Shylock, the man who is mocked by the Christians. He wants revenge, and this is driving him too far. The readers will not like the motif that is presented by Shakespeare. They will want this play banned from school and will not want to show their children. The desire of revenge is almost inseparable. This play provides a point of view in which racism can grow and become only a bigger problem. It will teach the reader to hate another race and racial discrimination will only grow and grow. There are a lot of racial comments in this play, and could indeed have an effect on the reader and also influence them in the wrong way. There is a lot of racism, especially between Shylock and Antonio. They both hate each other immensely and all throughout the play they are both snapping back and forth at each other. The other is probably hurt from what the other is saying, but they are not showing it. There is racist comment that is 'a Negro's belly', which is censored in the newer versions of The Merchant Of Venice. This is a fact in the play that racism is occurring and this could have an effect on the society. This is a reason why the school boards might want to take this play out of the curriculum. As you can see, there are many reasons The Merchant Of Venice should not be taught in classrooms. Although there are many reasons, The Merchant Of Venice is an excellent play and it should not be removed from the classroom. A. Whitney Griswold said in a speech, "Books won't stay banned. They won't burn. Ideas won't go to jail. In the long run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure weapon against bad ideas is better ideas." This quote here, by A. Whitney Griswold, clearly states the bad idea of racism in the play should be viewed by a positive view of anti-racism and showing how wrong the racism is. Also, if the play were to be banned, why hasn't it been banned yet? If the play were to be banned because of the character and portrayal of Shylock, this would be wrong, because the Christians portrayal was just as bad as Shylock's. They ended up taking away his religion from him and the punishment that was given to him was even more severe than the one he had intended. If the play were to be banned, they would have to look at both sides of the arguments. Most readers are missing out on the point of Shylock's. He is a human and he has feelings as well. After a discussion, it is concluded that The Merchant Of Venice should not be banned by the school authorities. This is an excellent play to be taught, and the problem of racism everybody is facing today. This play should be taught properly by a teacher, who can explain the play's meaning, so the students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither...
students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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All four members of the... All four members of the Wingfield family have chosen to hide from reality. Discuss this evaluation of the characters in The Glass Menagerie, making careful reference to the text. In Tennessee Williams' play, the glass menagerie, all four members of the Wingfield family have chosen to hide from reality. Amanda tries to relive her past through Laura, and denies anything she does not want to accept. Laura is terrified of the real world, and choses to hide behind her limp, her glass menagerie and the victrola. Tom hides from his reality by going to the movies, writing poetry, and getting drunk. Mr Wingfield hides from his reality by leaving his family and not contacting them after he has done so. Each member of the Wingfield family has their own escape mechanism which they use to hide or escape from the real world. Amanda has chosen to hide from reality by trying to relive her past. She is living in the unreality of her youthful memories and sees herself as still being as young as Laura when she says to her, 'No, sister, no, sister "“ you be the lady this time and I'll be the darkey' p 237. She reminisces about 'one Sunday afternoon in Blue Mountain' p 237 when she received seventeen gentleman callers, and then tries to relive this through Laura. She arranges for Tom to bring home some nice young man for his sister. When Tom brings home a gentleman caller, Amanda wears 'a girlish frock of yellowed voile with a blue silk sash' p 276, the dress that she wore as a girl for her own gentleman callers. The reader can see from this that Amanda is definitely living in the past. Another way that Amanda hides from reality is that she tries to deny anything that she does not want to accept. She denies that Laura is crippled, saying 'Nonsense! Laura, I've told you never, never to use that word.' p 247. Amanda believes that if she denies something so much, that it will not be true. This also occurs when Laura thinks that the gentleman caller will be her high school crush, and Amanda denies that it could be, 'It won't be him! It isn't the least bit likely.' p 278. It is in these ways that Amanda Wingfield hides from reality. Laura Wingfield has chosen to hide from reality in the play The Glass Menagerie. She seems to live in a world of her own, and hides from everything and everyone outside of the apartment. Laura is terrified of anything new or different. Her mother sent her to business college, but Laura was so afraid that 'The first time [they] gave a speed-test, she broke down completely "“ was sick at the stomach and almost had to be carried into the wash "“room.' p 243. Laura uses her limp as an excuse to hide from the world. She believes that her slight limp makes her crippled and that she cannot be a part of the real world because of it. Laura's glass menagerie and the victrola act as things which protect her from the real world in the play. Whenever she is uncertain or afraid, Laura reaches for one of these two things for comfort. When she finds out that Jim is engaged, and won't come to see her again, 'she rises unsteadily and crouches beside the victrola to wind it up.' p 307. The glass menagerie represents Laura to some extent, as she is fragile, like the glass and can be broken easily. The unicorn particularly represents Laura, as it is something that does not belong in the real world, as she does not. When Laura does briefly enter the real world, it is shown through the unicorn losing its horn, 'the horn was removed to make him feel less freakish "¦ Now he will feel more at home with the other horses.' p 303. Laura will never belong to the real world, as she desperately tries to hide from the reality of it in the play. In the play The Glass Menagerie, Tom Wingfield has chosen to hide from reality. Tom's reality is that he works in a warehouse, has a nagging mother, a shy, 'crippled' sister and he lives in a prison of an apartment. In order to escape the reality of his work in the warehouse, Tom often '[retires] to a cabinet of the washroom to work on poems when business was slack in the warehouse.' p 273. Doing this, Tom can hide from his work and co-workers in the reality of his life. Tom craves for adventure in his life, and he finds this by going to the movies night after night, with a 'shower of movie-ticket stubs' p 254 falling from his pocket when he comes home early one morning. He also drinks 'Kentucky Straight Bourbon' p 254 to temporarily escape from the prison-like apartment, at which he lives. These things help Tom to escape from his reality, however it is not very effective, as once he wakes up in the morning, he has to face the realities of his life once more. Tom seeks a more permanent escape, and becomes a member of the 'Union of Merchant Seamen.' p 283 hoping to leave his job at the warehouse and the apartment for good. This is Tom's ultimate escape from the real world. Mr Wingfield has also chosen to hide from reality in the play The Glass Menagerie. His reality was that he had a responsibility to look after his wife, son, and daughter. However, he neglects this responsibility, therefore escaping his reality, by abandoning his family "“ 'he gave up his job with the telephone company and skipped the light fantastic out of town"¦' p 235. There is a difference between Mr Wingfield and the rest of his family, and their escapes from reality. This is that Mr Wingfield created his own reality, and the others were living in the remains of what he left them. Mr Wingfield moves his wife to the city as he 'worked for the telephone company' p 285, and chose to raise his children there. After doing these things, he decides that it is not the life for him as he has '[fallen] in love with long distance!' p 285, and leaves without considering his family. He then hides from the fact that he has left his family by not contacting them regularly, the only contact being a postcard 'containing a message of two words "“ 'Hello "“Goodbye!' and no address.' p 235. This is how Mr Wingfield hides from reality in Williams' play, The Glass Menagerie. All four members of the Wingfield family have chosen to hide from reality in The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams. Each member of the family has a different route of escape from reality, which helps them to lead a better life. Amanda lives in the past and denies anything that threatens her, whilst Laura lives entirely in a world of her own, protected by the victrola and glass menagerie. Tom temporarily escapes his life through his poetry, heavy drinking and endless trips to the movies, and his father, Mr Wingfield has hidden from his reality by leaving his family. This is how the members of the Wingfield family have all chosen to hide from reality in the play.   

All four members of the Wingfield family have chosen to hide from reality. Discuss this evaluation of the characters in The Glass Menagerie, making careful reference to the text. In Tennessee Williams' play, the glass menagerie, all four members of the Wingfield family have chosen to hide from reality....

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This is an explorative essay on...This is an explorative essay on the theme in Patricia Grace's novel Potiki that 'telling and retelling stories is an important and valuable part of being human'. An important theme in Potiki is the enduring idea that creating and sharing stories as a central part of being human is important. It is a significant theme because the novel is heavily imbued with Maori culture, in which the stories and spoken teachings are given prominence, and also because it is a popular belief that people need narratives to give meaning, structure and value to their lives. This theme is displayed resolutely and poignantly in Potiki's plot, characters, setting and symbolism, as the people of a small rural New Zealand community rediscover themselves through stories spoken and found in Maori carvings. The idea that humans need narratives is the core theme in Potiki, and it is used also to link other themes and aspects of the novel; it is in this way that we know the idea of storytelling is an intrinsic part of the novel's structure. The idea that 'creating and sharing stories is important as a central part of being human' is shown in Potiki's plot and characters when the mother of the main family in the book, Roimata, decides to let two of her children learn at home instead of at school. Instead of teaching them herself in the style of a traditional European education system, both Roimata and the children learn naturally from stories and histories which are shown as being part of everyone"s life. For example, Roimata says, "It was a new discovery to find that these stories were, after all, about our own lives, were not distant, that there was no past or future that all time is now-time, centred in the being." Pp39. In this way Roimata and the children are essentially learning in a way in which all people learn to some extent: by sharing stories. The idea that the telling and retelling of stories sustains, enlarges and defines our view of the world is shown in Potiki when Roimata continues, "They were not new stories to us, except that stories are always new, or else there is always something new in stories." Pp132. The character is emphasising the moral and educational value of stories in human development and understanding by saying that there is always something to learn from stories, even when they are retold repeatedly. Each of the main characters in Potiki has a story to tell, and each story is equally important. Not all the stories are different, for example Roimata and Hemi live and tell similar stories, but nonetheless both are still important as they add understanding and different view points to each other. Roimata says, "And although the stories all had different voices, and came from different times and places and understandings"¦ each one was like a puzzle piece which tongued and grooved neatly together." Pp 41. Another way in which the idea that 'creating and sharing stories is a central part of being human' is explored in Potiki is through setting, as the freedom of expression and story-telling can be tied to the land because the landscape contains stories of the people. This idea is expressed later, "The land and the sea and the shores are a book too, and we found ourselves there." Pp104. The land is an important part of the characters" lives because they believe it contains within it the stories that make up their collective history. When developers begin to work on the ancestral land it is said, "We tried to turn our backs on the hills and not look up"¦we could not forget that it was land who, in the beginning, held the secret, who contained our very beginnings within herself." Pp110. The fact that Potiki is set in New Zealand is very significant to the theme because, as stated, narratives and oral teachings are very important in the understanding and teaching of Maori culture, in which Potiki is suffused. Symbolism plays a considerable part in exploring the storytelling theme in Potiki from the very beginning of the book in the prologue. The carver in Potiki does not merely carve figures out of wood, but instead seeks out and exposes the figures that are already hidden in the trees. It can be told from this idea that the carver represents the traditional storyteller in the way that the stories told "“ or figures carved "“ are already in existence, and the storyteller is the master who depicts the story for others to understand and learn from. Another way in which symbolism is used to explore the theme of the importance of storytelling is the distinct parallels, for example their "special knowing" and unusual births, between the character of Toko in Potiki and Maui, a supernatural being from Maori mythology. By linking the two characters the author is then able to link modern life represented by Toko with traditional stories and show how ancient parables can still be related to the present. A further way in which symbolism is used in Potiki to examine the importance of storytelling is the recurring allusion to the traditional Maori motif of the spiral of life and death. The spiral is never complete, and in the same way, there is always, as Roimata comments, "One more story to be told, a story not of beginning or an end but marking only a position on the spiral". Pp180. The core theme in Patricia Grace's novel Potiki that 'telling and retelling stories is an important and valuable part of being human' is useful to all readers because by sharing views with others and listening to each other and each other's stories, people not only learn about what is important to others, but what is valuable to themselves.   

This is an explorative essay on the theme in Patricia Grace's novel Potiki that 'telling and retelling stories is an important and valuable part of being human'. An important theme in Potiki is the enduring idea that creating and sharing stories as a central part of being human is important....

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