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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither of them will listen to the other, because their hearts are filled with intense prejudice. Some people would think the play itself was a racist. The reader might not want to portray the play to others, because of the villainous character of Shylock. The reader doesn't realize the Christians portrayal was just as bad as the Jewish man, Shylock's portrayal. The play teaches the reader about prejudice, why it is wrong. People would see how everyone was hurt at one time or another by a prejudice, whether it was the Christians mocking and making fun of Shylock or Shylock showing his prejudice to the Christians. This is first noticed in Act one when Shylock is openly saying to himself, "I hate him for he is a Christian....Curs'd be my tribe if I forgive him!" I, 3, 37-I, 3, 46-47. Antonio proves he is unwilling to change his prejudice feelings towards Shylock when he says, "I am as like to call thee so again, To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too." I, 3, 125-126 They do not realize their prejudiced attitudes and actions are portraying an ugly message to the reader and the reader is thinking, this is not suitable for younger children. Their messages could get themselves killed, which in fact comes very close to happening. This is a bad message that is portrayed to the reader. There is a motif of revenge in the play The Merchant Of Venice which also stuns the reader. Shylock has great hatred for Antonio, and his intent is getting revenge for all the things he assumes Antonio has done and said to him. "He hath disgraced me, and hindered me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies"”and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, What should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, Revenge!". III, 1, 49-59 This clearly explains the intent of Shylock, the man who is mocked by the Christians. He wants revenge, and this is driving him too far. The readers will not like the motif that is presented by Shakespeare. They will want this play banned from school and will not want to show their children. The desire of revenge is almost inseparable. This play provides a point of view in which racism can grow and become only a bigger problem. It will teach the reader to hate another race and racial discrimination will only grow and grow. There are a lot of racial comments in this play, and could indeed have an effect on the reader and also influence them in the wrong way. There is a lot of racism, especially between Shylock and Antonio. They both hate each other immensely and all throughout the play they are both snapping back and forth at each other. The other is probably hurt from what the other is saying, but they are not showing it. There is racist comment that is 'a Negro's belly', which is censored in the newer versions of The Merchant Of Venice. This is a fact in the play that racism is occurring and this could have an effect on the society. This is a reason why the school boards might want to take this play out of the curriculum. As you can see, there are many reasons The Merchant Of Venice should not be taught in classrooms. Although there are many reasons, The Merchant Of Venice is an excellent play and it should not be removed from the classroom. A. Whitney Griswold said in a speech, "Books won't stay banned. They won't burn. Ideas won't go to jail. In the long run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure weapon against bad ideas is better ideas." This quote here, by A. Whitney Griswold, clearly states the bad idea of racism in the play should be viewed by a positive view of anti-racism and showing how wrong the racism is. Also, if the play were to be banned, why hasn't it been banned yet? If the play were to be banned because of the character and portrayal of Shylock, this would be wrong, because the Christians portrayal was just as bad as Shylock's. They ended up taking away his religion from him and the punishment that was given to him was even more severe than the one he had intended. If the play were to be banned, they would have to look at both sides of the arguments. Most readers are missing out on the point of Shylock's. He is a human and he has feelings as well. After a discussion, it is concluded that The Merchant Of Venice should not be banned by the school authorities. This is an excellent play to be taught, and the problem of racism everybody is facing today. This play should be taught properly by a teacher, who can explain the play's meaning, so the students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither...
students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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"And I thought to myself,... "And I thought to myself, well, we're making a step-it's just a baby step, but it's a step." Do you agree with Miss Maudie that Maycomb has advanced as a result of the Tom Robinson case? To Kill a Mockingbird, crafted expressly, intricately and beautifully by Harper Lee exhibits the unrelenting Maycomb, a small town with big issues. This classical marvel along with its "authentic humour," is intertwined with the bigot and prejudice views of the township. The commencement of the Tom Robinson trial, in which a Negro is unjustly charged with the sexual assault of a young white girl triggers an onslaught towards blacks by the white people with horrific outcomes. But, it is one white man's attempt to make things just with all people that leads to remarkable results. Atticus Finch sets a standard of morality and wisdom. Through his influence and although his case is lost, Miss Maudie utters that the town is "making a step" p.238. This factual response is justifiable, as we notice the abnormal amount of discussing taking place behind the jury doors, some characters new analysis of the Negroes and foretelling that the younger generations can bring new hope for the "disease" infested town of Maycomb. Throughout much of the depression, Negroes have suffered from frequent massacres, threats and sexual assaults. Worse still is the ongoing ridicule the blacks faced even after they had been set free. Since the early years of freedom and when blacks were allowed to defend their name and innocence in court, they received harsh jail terms "“even if they were innocent. As the astute Reverend Sykes puts it, he had ""¦..never seen any jury decide in favour of a coloured man over a white man." p.230 The higher power, in this case, the white people, always seemed to prevail. Thus, meaning it took the jury less than four or five minutes to make their final decision. The Tom Robinson trial was relatively different from the other predictable cases. The case in itself was significant. This particular case came along with a message, which would someday banish all prejudice between the two races. The duration of the trial is exceptionally protracted. This factor fortifies the dreary hopes of the black people. It was very atypical for the jury to take as long as two hours to come to a decision. Even the poignant Atticus had his expectations rise after seeing the jury out for a lengthy period of time. During the days since Tom Robinson's conviction, Atticus points out to his children that ""¦there was one fellow who took considerable wearing down "“ in the beginning he was rarin' for an outright acquittal." p.245 This particular person was in fact a Cunningham. Since the day after the attempt to kill Tom Robinson outside Maycomb County's jailhouse, the Cunningham's have obtained a new perception towards Negroes. The unknown Cunningham contributed to the time-consuming discussing between the jury. Even as typical country folk who went to extremes when dealing with Negroes, the Cunningham's prove to us that people can in fact change. Thus, making the town of Maycomb one step closer to the expulsion of narrow-mindedness. The majority of white characters in this novel all share the same and common views held against Negroes. Their speculations are spread from one to another and soon, these gullible minds evolve to become one, big, unyielding "disease". But remarkably, some minor characters were providential enough to stay immune from the chauvinism. Astute people such as Heck Tate, Dolphus Raymond, B.B. Underwood and Link Deas stay focused on the "right path", and have a perception onto one race only. Maycomb County's leading sheriff, Heck Tate is one of the few who does not side with any one particular race. He is a decent and level minded man who tries to his utmost ability to protect the innocent from danger. He is an honest and upstanding man and his ability to dispel any bigotry earns him the respect of Atticus and the Finch children. Dolphus Raymond, although white, decides to settle on marrying a black woman and produce "mixed children." His behaviour is supposedly due to his frequent drinking, but we soon learn that Dolphus Raymond prefers to live with blacks because he is simply jaded by the hypocrisy of the white people. The publisher of Maycomb's newspaper, Mr. Underwood is a rational man with a sympathetic nature toward cripples especially. Although not very fond of blacks, he writes in his editorial that the death of Tom Robinson associates with the ""¦senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children." p.265 Although not exactly keen on blacks, he still did write an editorial - on behalf of Tom Robinson"¦ Tom Robinson's past employer, Link Deas is another face of tolerance. He has a strong willingness to look past prejudice and praise the integrity of Tom. With this, he hires Helen Robinson. The presence of Helen at his work shop is futile, because Link ""¦didn't really need her Helen, but he said he felt right bad about the way things turned out."p.274 Here, Link Deas shows his sympathetic nature. He is also somewhat of a deity to Helen Robinson. It is he who drives Bob Ewell from pestering and threatening Helen. These characters are a few of the ever-changing people in Maycomb. These people play a dramatic role in bringing the town of Maycomb a step closer to changing, as they become conscious to the fact that all Negroes are human too. The upbringing of life can lead to positive results. That is, if you raise children in the proper manner. One person who has done this exceptionally well is Atticus Finch. His two children, Jeremy Jem and Jean Louise Scout have been raised with the fact that all people are equal. Their appreciation of human goodness is admirable, and thus, influences their new mate Charles Baker Harris Dill. These three young minds bring hope that will eventually banish all hatred in their hometown. Their sympathetic approach to human nature maybe the key into inducing other children to realise the importance of kindness towards the opposite race. From the beginning of the trial, we see the determination of the children to cast out the injustice taking place. Jem, especially, carries a strong hope of changing the town by becoming a lawyer and changing the townsfolk's perception on each other and the opposite race. Atticus' influence on the Maycomb citizens had a huge impact. The children can accomplish just as much as Atticus. Their mature insight into the world suggests that their views will play a major role in re-shaping Maycomb. The children's impact on society will be a advantage for all. They, like Atticus, will be the benefactors in guiding Maycomb to end discrimination of all kinds, thus, creating one more step in the race to ban prejudice of all nature. Lee's portrayal of Maycomb is, in a sense, pragmatic. We learn that from bad things, come good. Even though Maycomb is obstinate in acceptance, hope still lies for the township. Maycomb has made some steps in advancing as a town. The changing characters in the novel will be a boon to all Maycomb citizens, as they provide the backbone of an ever-strengthening new stand against prejudice. Progress does take time, but perseverance will surmount over this relentless task. Maycomb will soon shine with the radiance of peace. Though they haven't progressed a great deal, they still did manage to make some small steps. The fight for justice in the small country town will not cease, for, as long as the town has determination, absolutely nothing can hinder their walk to reach tolerance"¦"¦ And, after all, some steps are better than no steps at all.   

"And I thought to myself, well, we're making a step-it's just a baby step, but it's a step." Do you agree with Miss Maudie that Maycomb has advanced as a result of the Tom Robinson case? To Kill a Mockingbird, crafted expressly, intricately and beautifully by Harper Lee exhibits...

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Similes in the Iliad and... Similes in the Iliad and What They Tell Us About Life in Homer"s Greece "The Iliad", an epic tale told by the famous Greek author Homer, is focused primarily on the Trojan War between the Greeks, or Argives, and the Trojans. This war was filled with bloody battles and a massive loss of life. Homer tells stories about a duration of time during this fighting, and not the entire war. He uses his story-telling abilities to focus the audience on the garish and sometimes mundane drudgery of war. Due to his removal from the actual time of these battles, his stories may be embellished or not completely accurate descriptions of what did or did not happen. Overall, however, the Iliad is believed to be mostly true. Homer was born, most likely, in the 8th Century B.C. He is widely believed to be the best and most popular of the Ionian poets. His birthplace is not known beyond a doubt. Some have even said that he may have been blind. This idea has its share of critics though, since Homer details specific landscape scenes all throughout his works, and most of his writing is focused on the vision of the scene in which he describes. Homer relies heavily on descriptions to get his points across to the audience. In Homer"s time, stories were told orally. Therefore, as a good writer, he attempted to write eloquently to convey to the audience the overall feeling of his stories. William Shakespeare did the same thing in his writing. Shakespeare knew that his work was going to be performed, and that his audience was predominantly illiterate. He knew that if he created a quality story and told it in an interesting way, he would gain greater popularity by allowing those who didn"t understand to be entertained anyway. Homer used this to his advantage in his time also through the use of elaborate descriptions of battles and scenes, and with similes and metaphors. The similes and metaphors of The Iliad, in my opinion, are the real attention-grabbing parts of the story. Homer"s descriptions using similes are mostly very detailed and often rather grotesque. The similes in his writing serve to make the audience imagine exactly what is happening in the story. For example: "They swarmed forth like wasps from a roadside nest"¦" p.421, 305-308 Homer could simply say that the army moved forward and swarmed the opposing lines, but by the use of his simile, the audience gets a perfect example of what Homer is trying to convey to us. Along with similes and metaphors providing us with a better understanding of what is happening in the story, they also tell us about the world in which Homer lived in, which was Greece in the 8th Century B.C. Most of the clues as to ancient Greek life come as no surprise. It is not surprising to find that the Greeks recognized the Moon during this period: ""¦ the massive shield flashing far and wide like a full round moon"¦" p. 500, 422 Nor is it shocking to hear of lions in Greece at this time: ""¦like a great bearded lion the dogs and field hands drive back"¦" p.446, 126-127 However, even though these similes sometimes may seem unimportant or even redundant, every situation they are used in is different. A lion may be just another lion, but no two conflicts that they describe are exactly alike. Homer uses this thought to convey the energy, and even at times beauty, of his fighting scenes. The one main theme of the plot to The Iliad is its raging battle. So, most of the similes throughout the book are about warfare. Battles are compared to things such as animals, weather, or even fire. In consideration, these three things are actually connected by their inherent naturalness. Animals, weather, and fire are all parts of what we refer to as "nature". By evaluating Homer"s similes with "nature" included, we today can see what ancient Greek "nature" may have been like. First of all, most of the similes from The Iliad are comparing something to an animal. Several animals that are mentioned throughout the book are, for example: deer, lions, sheep, dogs, wolves, and hawks. The special thing about this is that each animal is always given a dominant or submissive quality. For example: "As ravenous wolves come swooping down on lambs"¦so the Achaeans mauled the Trojans." p. 424, 415. This passage shows the dominance and inherent aggressiveness of the wolf, while making the lamb to be a submissive, a victim of the wolves" aggression. This simile shows how the fighting was going at that time for the two sides. The Achaeans were the aggressive wolves and the Trojans were the victimized lambs. These animal-focused similes also show the ferocity with which the two sides battled when fighting each other. Many of Homer"s similes describe the merciless blood-lust shown by the armies. For example: "Hungry as wolves that rend and bolt raw flesh"¦" p. 417, 188. This describes the fierce destruction by Achilles" warriors of the opposing forces in blunt, raw terms. Along with many similes being about nature"s animals, many others involve nature"s weather. Dust storms, hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, thunder, and others are all used to describe some aspect of the fighting. Once again, these references show the ferocity with which the armies battled. For example: "But now, wild as a black cyclone twisting out of a cloudbank, building up from the day"s heat, blasts and towers- so brazen Ares looked to Tydeus" son Diomedes." p.192, 997-1000 and, "As gale-winds swirl and shatter under the shrilling gusts on days when drifts of dust lie piled thick on the roads and winds whip up the dirt in a dense whirling cloud- so the battle broke"¦" p. 352, 388-391 Fire was also used by Homer to describe the intensity of The Iliad"s battles. These were not used as much as the references to animals in the book, but fire did prove to be a major description of the fighting, as in this excerpt: "Achilles now like inhuman fire raging on through the mountain gorges splinter-dry, setting ablaze big stands of timber"¦storming on with brandished spear"¦" p.519, 553-559. Along with the fighting and nature, Homer"s similes also show us the societal norms in ancient Greek culture when it comes to differences between the sexes. Men were described in grand God-like terms, while women were given praise for being nurturing and caring. As a man was supposed to be rather stoic, so a woman was supposed to show emotion. Examples of this are: ""¦Tlepolemus tall and staunch"¦his strong fate was driving him now against Sarpedon, a man like a god." p. 184-185, 722-724, This describes the two men as god-like and sizeable in stature, and: "And so Briseis returned"¦but when she saw Patroclus lying torn by bronze, she flung herself on his body"¦ she sobbed like a goddess in her grief"¦" p. 497, 333-335. The second example shows the expectancy of women to lose control of their emotions and display their inner feelings. When Briseis sobs heavily, she is even said to be "like a goddess". Men would most likely not be called "like a God" if they were to sob and throw themselves on the body of a loved-one. The question remains; however, does this difference in the expected nature of men and women make women seem submissive to the stronger, less emotional males? On one hand, lack of emotion in Homer"s Greece was probably seen as being strong, or above pain and sorrow. Thus, males would be seen as stronger, more dominant. However, by today"s standards it is known that emotions are inescapable and must be dealt with. If the ancient Greeks did know this, then females may have a socially accepted dominance over men, but they probably did not. Finally, another important reference-type used in Homer"s similes in The Iliad deal with occupations and activities in ancient Greece"s day-to-day life. Many similes have some occupation or action in them, which the Greeks performed. For example: ""¦the ranks pulled closer, tight as a mason packs a good stone wall"¦" p. 419, 250-251 This excerpt shows that the ancient Greeks had masons, or men to do the building of structures. Homer also makes references to other known ancient occupations, such as farmers and priests. Nurses and poets are also talked about in The Iliad. If analyzed, it can be seen that once again in ancient Greek culture, women are expected to be the nurturers and men the laborers. Women were most often nurses, housewives, maids, or even teachers. Men were usually masons, farmers, professional warriors, or craftsmen of some sort. In conclusion, many inferences can be made pertaining to the common, everyday life in ancient Greece through Homer"s similes in The Iliad. They describe the landscape, animals, weather, societal roles, and occupations. Along with helping the audience to visualize the scenes in The Iliad, these similes also shed light onto the world in which Homer lived.  

Similes in the Iliad and What They Tell Us About Life in Homer"s Greece "The Iliad", an epic tale told by the famous Greek author Homer, is focused primarily on the Trojan War between the Greeks, or Argives, and the Trojans. This war was filled with bloody battles and...

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