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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither of them will listen to the other, because their hearts are filled with intense prejudice. Some people would think the play itself was a racist. The reader might not want to portray the play to others, because of the villainous character of Shylock. The reader doesn't realize the Christians portrayal was just as bad as the Jewish man, Shylock's portrayal. The play teaches the reader about prejudice, why it is wrong. People would see how everyone was hurt at one time or another by a prejudice, whether it was the Christians mocking and making fun of Shylock or Shylock showing his prejudice to the Christians. This is first noticed in Act one when Shylock is openly saying to himself, "I hate him for he is a Christian....Curs'd be my tribe if I forgive him!" I, 3, 37-I, 3, 46-47. Antonio proves he is unwilling to change his prejudice feelings towards Shylock when he says, "I am as like to call thee so again, To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too." I, 3, 125-126 They do not realize their prejudiced attitudes and actions are portraying an ugly message to the reader and the reader is thinking, this is not suitable for younger children. Their messages could get themselves killed, which in fact comes very close to happening. This is a bad message that is portrayed to the reader. There is a motif of revenge in the play The Merchant Of Venice which also stuns the reader. Shylock has great hatred for Antonio, and his intent is getting revenge for all the things he assumes Antonio has done and said to him. "He hath disgraced me, and hindered me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies"”and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, What should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, Revenge!". III, 1, 49-59 This clearly explains the intent of Shylock, the man who is mocked by the Christians. He wants revenge, and this is driving him too far. The readers will not like the motif that is presented by Shakespeare. They will want this play banned from school and will not want to show their children. The desire of revenge is almost inseparable. This play provides a point of view in which racism can grow and become only a bigger problem. It will teach the reader to hate another race and racial discrimination will only grow and grow. There are a lot of racial comments in this play, and could indeed have an effect on the reader and also influence them in the wrong way. There is a lot of racism, especially between Shylock and Antonio. They both hate each other immensely and all throughout the play they are both snapping back and forth at each other. The other is probably hurt from what the other is saying, but they are not showing it. There is racist comment that is 'a Negro's belly', which is censored in the newer versions of The Merchant Of Venice. This is a fact in the play that racism is occurring and this could have an effect on the society. This is a reason why the school boards might want to take this play out of the curriculum. As you can see, there are many reasons The Merchant Of Venice should not be taught in classrooms. Although there are many reasons, The Merchant Of Venice is an excellent play and it should not be removed from the classroom. A. Whitney Griswold said in a speech, "Books won't stay banned. They won't burn. Ideas won't go to jail. In the long run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure weapon against bad ideas is better ideas." This quote here, by A. Whitney Griswold, clearly states the bad idea of racism in the play should be viewed by a positive view of anti-racism and showing how wrong the racism is. Also, if the play were to be banned, why hasn't it been banned yet? If the play were to be banned because of the character and portrayal of Shylock, this would be wrong, because the Christians portrayal was just as bad as Shylock's. They ended up taking away his religion from him and the punishment that was given to him was even more severe than the one he had intended. If the play were to be banned, they would have to look at both sides of the arguments. Most readers are missing out on the point of Shylock's. He is a human and he has feelings as well. After a discussion, it is concluded that The Merchant Of Venice should not be banned by the school authorities. This is an excellent play to be taught, and the problem of racism everybody is facing today. This play should be taught properly by a teacher, who can explain the play's meaning, so the students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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Many schools and school boards have decided that The Merchant Of Venice is an unsuitable play for classroom study, on the grounds that it may be offensive to some students. The play famous for 'a pound of flesh', and the lines "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". III, 1, 57-59 The Merchant Of Venice portrays a prejudiced message. All throughout the play, the Christians are battling with the Jew, Shylock, and neither...
students do not miss any important points from it. The play can teach many new, great things to the reader, and it can also have a positive effect on them. The reader will understand the play has a point to it and how wrong all this revenge, prejudice, and racism is and can be. If this play is read correctly, it will stop one person from being racist, by teaching them it is wrong. This play is a strong, emotional read, and it should always remain in the classrooms, so the students can gain the knowledge of reading this.
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Perfection can never be obtained, and...Perfection can never be obtained, and it exists only as an ideal. In Hamlet, Shakespeare sheds light on the tragic flaws of heroic characters; the tragedy that befalls Hamlet is the result of his unrealistic idealism, which is the cause of Hamlet's alienation and indecisiveness. Hamlet's unrealistic idealism alienates him. His abhorrence of women's "frailty"I,ii,146 causes his relationship with Gertrude and Ophelia to deteriorate. Hamlet expects his mother to mourn for her husband's death and to live a life honouring him; however, the queen remarries with Claudius. Hamlet is deeply discouraged by the marriage of his uncle and his mother; he describes it as "incestuous sheets,"I,ii,157 and belittles the queen by commenting that "a beast that wants discourse of reason would have mourn'd longer."I,ii,150 Because the reality does not meet Hamlet's expectations, he loses respect for women, thus viewing them as a lower class. It is expressed through his derogatory speeches and actions against Gertrude where he confronts her not as a son, but as a criticizer. He refers her as "stew'd in corruption, honeying and making love over the nasty sty,"III,iv,95 and physically assaults her. Hamlet can no longer find comfort, nor is willing to accept help from his mother, hence being alone to challenge Claudius. In addition, Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia breaks because Ophelia does not live up to his expectations of love; love, from Hamlet's perspective, has to be fair, honest, eternal, and can never be defiled. When Ophelia returns Hamlet's gifts, and lies in order to conceal the ruse that Polonius has planned, Hamlet's image of Ophelia's love shatters to pieces by the cruel reality. Hence, his perspective of women, who are the source of love, is completely transformed into hatred. Hamlet, a misogynist, tells Ophelia to "get thee to nunnery" because she can't keep honesty and fairness in the world unless she is in the nunnery free of sin and temptation. An allegorical insult is implied too because nunnery can also mean a "brothel" where sinful and lustful women go. Furthermore, he alienates himself from his friends "“ Rosencrantz and Guildenstern "“ because they do not suit Hamlet's expectations of a worthy friend. Since Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are faulty, intellectually challenged, and untrustworthy, Hamlet does not consider them as equals; they are looked down upon. Thus, he mocks, ridicules, and insults their forced and unwilling attempts to spy on Hamlet. As a result, he eliminates any benefits that he could have derived from colluding with them against Claudius, which only hastens his demise. If Hamlet respected and politely treated Rosencrantz and Guildenstern despite their faults and flaws, they could have helped Hamlet's situation by pacifying Claudius's agitation on Hamlet's madness, and even possibly providing Hamlet with information and support. Ironically, Hamlet's idealism not only alienates him from the world, it alienates his mind from himself. The fact that he can't live up to his expectations frustrate him, resulting in self-abhorrence. The self-hatred perpetuates his indecisiveness and drives him into the maelstrom of the existential dilemma where he questions the purpose of life. He calls himself "a coward"II,ii,568 who "must, like a whore, unpack his [my] heart with words,"II,ii,583 and yet, shows no signs of assertiveness and commitment; as a matter of fact, Hamlet occupies himself in the pompous intellectual debate within himself concerning the existential dilemma: "to be or not to be: that is the question."III,i,57 Hamlet seeks ideal opportunities for his revenge; this results in his indecisiveness and reluctance. First of all, Hamlet is not willing to take any chances. He places the ghost's statements in doubt that the ghost "may be the devil who hath the power to assume a pleasing shape."II,ii,596 Until he has the perfect justifications and reasons for the revenge, he cannot perform the deed; therefore, he sets up a play "to catch the conscience of the king"II,ii,604 which is merely an excuse for his cowardliness. Furthermore, Hamlet's reluctance to kill Claudius while he is praying best illustrates the search for ideal opportunity. Hamlet considers the murder as "hire and salary"III,iii,80 where he is doing a favor for the murderer by sending him to heaven. Hence, he decides to wait for the ideal moment when "there is no relish of salvation"III,iii,93 in his actions where "his soul may be damn'd and black as hell, where to it goes."III,iii,95 Hamlet's refusal to commit revenge pushes him to a deeper predicament where the King directly threatens his life. Ironically, since perfection can never be attained, Hamlet will never be satisfied with anything he does. Just like a writer with deadlines, he will never be able to achieve anything, which is the ultimate cause of his failure. Hamlet's indecisiveness and alienation is the result of his idealistic propriety; it is one of the major tragic flaws that destroy Hamlet. There is a difference between what it "should be" and what it "really is," and as for Hamlet, his attempts to synchronize the reality with ideality results in catastrophe. Just like Holden Caulfield , Hamlet has fought a losing battle against the human nature.   

Perfection can never be obtained, and it exists only as an ideal. In Hamlet, Shakespeare sheds light on the tragic flaws of heroic characters; the tragedy that befalls Hamlet is the result of his unrealistic idealism, which is the cause of Hamlet's alienation and indecisiveness. Hamlet's unrealistic idealism alienates him....

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