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For my Advertisements I have chosen two adverts selling cars to two very different target audiences. My first is an advert for the Toyota Corolla; this advert is in the "S:2" Sunday express supplement, this magazine is stereotypically read by middle class couples. This advert is laid out on a double page spread to make readers focus on the product and not be drawn to other visible adverts from other companies. It focuses on visual humour with surprisingly little text and no pseudo science, which is the strategy typically used by car manufacturers to sell their products. It...
an image to take with them. This causes the ad to stick in their minds and be recalled at a completely unconnected moment.

Unlike the first advert this one does contain a price within the copy although it is still very small and not easily noticed.

The Volvo slogan "for life" is included in the bottom left hand corner along with a rpm gauge, which creates the impression of high performance. In conclusion these ads are more similar than they first appear and yet the different target audiences cause subtle differences which cannot be ignored.

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In this essay I will attempt...In this essay I will attempt to compare and contrast the poem "Meeting at Night" by Robert Browning with "Resolution and Independence" by William Wordsworth. I shall begin by analysing the poems and looking for three similarities and differences, which will make me decide my final conclusion. The simplest similarity that links these two poems is that they are both about nature. Meeting at Night gives the impression of secrecy and darkness that goes together with the night and the morning suggests the revelation which light brings that prevents them getting together. In Resolution and Independence Wordsworth describes the nature more briefly and accurately. The language Wordsworth has used has a great effect on our senses. For example, in the first line 'There was a roaring in the wind all night' Here the use of metaphor 'roaring in the wind' used by Wordsworth relies on our sense of hearing to enable us to experience this image fully. An image however is not necessarily only a visual image; the image can be created by the poet"s use of different senses and qualities. Both of the poems also change from negative to positive. In the first verse of Meeting at Night, Browning emphasizes a man's desperate and brave quest for romantic pleasure, which is prevented with obstacles and doubt. Also in the poem "Meeting At Night," a powerfully romantic mood is built almost entirely by the use of images, which practically involve all of our senses. Only in the language of the third and fourth lines there is a hint of a metaphor used, which describes similarities between waves and living creatures: 'And startled little waves that leap In fiery ringlets from their sleep,' The use of personification that gives personal qualities to the waves builds on the emotional description of nature and makes us more involved in the poem. It also helps us to relate to the description very easily. In Resolution and Independence, we are given a scene of the countryside that was stormy the previous night, but has cleared up through the morning and now proves to be a cheerful day. Both poems use traditional poetic techniques well. In Meeting at Night, Browning uses alliteration in the line, 'Then a mile of warm, sea "“ scented beach;' The use of alliteration is used to create specific sound effects. For example, the repetition of the 's' sound echoes as being read which will improve the emotional effect the poet is trying to achieve. By describing it to us using alliteration, the poet helps us hear as well as picture the scene he wishes to create. Personally this technique made me draw more attention to particular words. In Resolution and Independence in the language of the fifth line there is a hint of assonance used, 'Over his own sweet voice the Stock "“ dove broods;' The assonance is in the repetition of the "o" sound it is long and lasting and it also creates a brilliant effect by occurring in the slow and deliberate part of the poem. Resolution and Independence also uses iambic pentameter which is an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one more thoughtfully than Meeting at Night e.g. 'There was a roaring in the wind all night' The underlined words are all stressed syllables, which make the poem easy to understand and it also results in a clear structure. On the other hand these two poems have variety of differences. Meeting at Night has detailed narrative structure with a beginning, middle and end, but Resolution and Independence has little narrative structure but is more descriptive and accurate. The structure of Meeting at Night is clear and an important contributor to the overall effect it has on us. The way Browning slowly builds up the tension throughout the poem helps us create a feeling of real excitement and mystery. In the poem the narrative structure is revealed through a series of images and ideas, which gradually develop the feeling and the meaning. Personally Meeting at Night has engaged me to read on to find out what happens next. It also creates suspense and tension by moving from negative to positive. The metre gives us meaning far more clearly and thoughtfully in Resolution and Independence. For example, in line 1, 'There was a roaring in the wind all night' The image is wild, rough and casual. But as the story gradually develops the image starts to appear normal. Usually syllables that rhyme are stressed e.g. night"“bright, floods"“ woods. Boring or common syllables are rarely stressed e.g. was, a, in etc. The thoughtful use of Iambic pentameter in Resolution and Independence makes the poem for us as readers far easier and straightforward. Wordsworth's use of imagery makes us relate this poem to the environment we are living in, which makes this poem more realistic and true. Resolution and Independence also involves animals, unlike Meeting at Night, which is more about human beings and their struggles. Personally, I believe Wordsworth highlights the needs and struggles of animals and not just humans. Also there is the use of onomatopoeia in Resolution and Independence; 'roaring' a word that imitates natural sound, so that sound reflects sense making the poem more exciting. In Meeting at Night Browning takes advantage of poetic techniques such as onomatopoeia and repeats this technique repeatedly throughout the poem which creates a desired effect. I personally believe the two poets are using different approaches to express the same emotion, which are the passion, feeling and love of nature. They also use similar ideas and images but far more differently. Both of these poets have chosen their words carefully, each word is there for a purpose. Both of these poems contain words that have their own special pleasant sounds for example 'slushy' and 'roaring'. I think the easiest way a poet can create a brilliant image is through the use of metaphor, simile and personification. Effective imagery almost etches itself on our mind as readers and can be a very persuasive, acting to engage us strongly in the writing.   

In this essay I will attempt to compare and contrast the poem "Meeting at Night" by Robert Browning with "Resolution and Independence" by William Wordsworth. I shall begin by analysing the poems and looking for three similarities and differences, which will make me decide my final conclusion. The simplest...

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Eldrick Tiger Woods, now 28 years...Eldrick Tiger Woods, now 28 years of age, has had an amazing career since becoming a professional golfer in the late summer of 1996. He has won 52 tournaments, 39 of those on the PGA TOUR, including the 1997, 2001, and 2002 Masters Tournaments, 1999 and 2000 PGA Championships, 2000 and 2002 U.S. Open Championship, and 2000 British Open Championship. With his second Masters victory in 2001, Tiger became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time. He is the career victories leader among active players on the PGA TOUR, and is the career money list leader. Woods won 11 tournaments in 2000, nine on the PGA TOUR, one on the PGA European Tour and the PGA Grand Slam. In addition, Woods and David Duval won the World Cup team title for the United States. He earned $9,188,321 on the PGA TOUR $11,034,530 worldwide and broke the PGA TOUR record of $6,616,585 which he set in 1999. Tiger increased his record total on the PGA TOUR career money list to $33,103,852 through 2002, and had won $41,213,162 worldwide. His nine PGA TOUR victories in 2000 equaled the fifth highest total ever and were the most since Sam Snead won 11 in 1950. He had eight PGA TOUR victories in 1999, and 11 victories worldwide while winning $7,681,625. In 2000, Woods matched the record of Ben Hogan in 1953 in winning three professional major championships in the same year. Hogan won the Masters, U.S. Open and British Open. Tiger also became the first since Denny Shute in 1936-37 to win the PGA Championship in consecutive years. In winning the British Open, Woods became the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships and only the fifth ever to do so, following Hogan, Gene Sarazen, Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus. Tiger also was the youngest Masters champion ever, at the age of 21 years, three months and 14 days, and was the first major championship winner of African or Asian heritage. Woods holds or shares the record for the low score in relation to par in each of the four major championships. His records are 270 18 under par in the Masters, 272 12 under par in the U.S. Open, 269 19 under par in the British Open, and he shares the record of 270 18 under par with Bob May in the 2000 PGA Championship, which Tiger won by one stroke in a three-hole playoff. The U.S. Open and Masters victories came by record margins, 15 strokes and 12 strokes respectively, and the U.S. Open triumph swept aside the 13-stroke major championship standard which had stood for 138 years, established by Old Tom Morris in the 1862 British Open. The record margin for the U.S. Open had been 11 strokes by Willie Smith in 1899. In the Masters, Woods broke the record margin of nine strokes set by Nicklaus in 1965. Tiger won the British Open by eight strokes, the largest margin since J. H. Taylor in 1913. The best previous start on the PGA TOUR was by Horton Smith, who had eight PGA TOUR victories in 1929 at age 21 and 15 career victories in 1931 at age 23. By winning eight PGA TOUR titles and 11 overall in 1999, Woods had posted career totals of 15 PGA TOUR victories and 21 overall at age 23. The comparable figures for Nicklaus, through age 24 in 1964, were 12 PGA TOUR victories and 17 overall. Nicklaus had been a professional golfer for three years, one year less than Tiger. Woods" six professional major championships and three U.S. Amateur titles bring his total to nine major championships through age 25, three more than Nicklaus at that age. Nicklaus had four professional major victories and two U.S. Amateur titles. Woods compiled one of the most impressive amateur records in golf history, winning six USGA national championships, plus the NCAA title, before turning professional on August 27, 1996. He concluded his amateur career by winning an unprecedented third consecutive U.S. Amateur title, finishing with a record 18 consecutive match-play victories. An achievement which ranks with any of his professional records, Woods won the U.S. Junior Amateur three times and was the first to win that title more than once. He was the youngest ever to win the U.S. Junior Amateur age 15 in 1991 and the youngest ever to win the U.S. Amateur age 18 in 1994. With his U.S. Open victory, Tiger became the first ever to hold that title along with the U.S. Junior Amateur and U.S. Amateur titles. He is the son of Earl Woods, a retired lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army, and his wife, Kultida, a native of Thailand. He was nicknamed Tiger after a Vietnamese soldier and friend of his father, Vuong Dang Phong, to whom his father had also given that nickname. Born on December 30, 1975, Woods grew up in Cypress, California, 35 miles southeast of Los Angeles. He was not out of the crib before he took an interest in golf, at age 6 months, watching as his father hit golf balls into a net and imitating his swing. He appeared on the Mike Douglas Show at age 2, putting with Bob Hope. He shot 48 for nine holes at age 3 and was featured in Golf Digest at age 5. He won the Optimist International Junior tournament six times at ages 8, 9, 12, 13, 14 and 15. Tiger played in his first professional tournament in 1992, at age 16, the Nissan Los Angeles Open and in three more PGA TOUR events in 1993. He made the 36-hole cut and tied for 34th place in the 1994 Johnnie Walker Asian Classic in Thailand, and had three additional PGA TOUR appearances. He entered Stanford University in 1994 and in two years he won 10 collegiate events, concluding with the NCAA title. His other amateur victories included the 1994 Western Amateur. He represented the United States in the 1994 World Amateur Team Championships in France and the 1995 Walker Cup Match in Wales. He played his first major championships in 1995, making the 36-hole cuts in the Masters and the British Open, but had to withdraw from the U.S. Open because of an injured wrist. Tiger also made the cuts in the Motorola Western Open and Scottish Open. He played in three more major championships in 1996, making the cuts in two. After missing the cut in the Masters, he led the U.S. Open after 13 holes of the first round before finishing tied for 82nd place. Tiger posted a 281 total to tie the record for an amateur in the British Open, and his 66 in the second round equaled the lowest ever by an amateur. He tied for 22nd place. Among the honors received as an amateur, Woods was Golf Digest Player of the Year in 1991 and 1992, Golf World Player of the Year in 1992 and 1993, Golfweek National Amateur of the Year in 1992, Golf World Man of the Year in 1994, and he was chosen for the Fred Haskins and Jack Nicklaus College Player of the Year awards in 1996. The week after winning his third U.S. Amateur title, Woods played his first tournament as a professional in the Greater Milwaukee Open. It was one of only seven events left in 1996 for him to finish among the top 125 money winners and earn a player"s card for the PGA TOUR. The result was an achievement of which Tiger remains very proud. He won two tournaments and placed among the top 30 money winners qualifying for the Tour Championship. He finished 25th with $790,594 and won $940,420 for the year worldwide in 11 tournaments. He was the first rookie since 1990 to win twice and the first player since 1982 to have five consecutive top-five finishes. Starting 1997 in spectacular fashion, Tiger won the season-opening Mercedes Championships with a birdie in a playoff over Tom Lehman with a six-iron shot that drew perfectly to the flag, landing two feet right of the hole and spinning back to within inches. Including the Masters, Woods won four PGA TOUR events in 1997, plus one overseas, and was the leading money winner Arnold Palmer Award with a then-record $2,066,833. He won $2,440,831 worldwide in 25 events. He achieved No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking for the most rapid progression ever to that position. On June 15, 1997, in his 42nd week as a professional, Woods became the youngest-ever No. 1 golfer at age 21 years, 24 weeks. The previous youngest was Bernhard Langer, age 29 years, 31 weeks in 1986. In 1998 Woods won one event on the PGA TOUR, and three times overall. He was fourth on the money list with $1,841,117 and earned $2,927,006 worldwide in 26 events. His most dramatic triumph was over Ernie Els in the Johnnie Walker Classic in Thailand. Tiger rallied with 65 in the final round after starting tied for 18th place, eight strokes behind Els, whom he beat with a birdie on the second playoff hole. He had been 11 strokes behind Els after two rounds. In his third full season as a professional, 1999, Woods won eight times on the PGA TOUR, including the PGA Championship, and earned $6,616,585. He had a margin of $2,974,679 over runnerup David Duval, a figure greater than the previous single-year PGA TOUR record. His dominance was such that Woods won 52 percent of all the prize money he could have won. He won 81.7 percent more than the runnerup, the highest margin since Byron Nelson in 1945 87.2 percent and Hogan in 1946 85 percent. He was the first to have as many as eight PGA TOUR victories in one year since Johnny Miller won eight in 1974. Tiger won four consecutive PGA TOUR events to end 1999 and started 2000 with two more victories for a total of six in succession. He had to come from behind for the fifth and sixth victories. He played the last three holes in four under par at the Mercedes Championships, then defeated Els in a playoff with a 40-foot birdie putt. He trailed Matt Gogel by seven strokes with seven holes left in the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, then played the last four holes in four under par to win by two strokes. There has been only one longer winning streak, Nelson"s 11 consecutive wins in 1945. Woods won five times on the PGA TOUR in 2001 and eight times worldwide. He won five times on the PGA TOUR again in 2002 and seven times worldwide, and was the PGA TOUR's leading money winner for the fourth consecutive year with $6,912,625 $8,417,188 worldwide. Sports Illustrated selected Woods as the 1996 and 2000 Sportsman of the Year. He was the first to win that award more than once. L'Equipe France selected him as 2000 World Champion of Champions. The Associated Press chose Woods as the Male Athlete of the Year for 1997, 1999 and 2000. He and Michael Jordan are the only athletes to win that award three times. He was selected as Reuters 2000 Sportsman of the Year. He was chosen as ESPY Male Athlete of the Year in 1997 tied with Ken Griffey, Jr., 1999 and 2000. The founding members of the World Sports Academy, in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards, also selected Tiger as 1999 and 2000 World Sportsman of the Year. Woods was selected as 1997, 1999 and 2000, and 2001 Player of the Year by the PGA TOUR Jack Nicklaus Award, the PGA of America, and the Golf Writers Association of America. His adjusted scoring average in 2000 of 67.79 strokes was the lowest ever "“ breaking his record of 68.43 in 1999 "“ and earned the Byron Nelson Award on the PGA TOUR and the Vardon Trophy from the PGA of America. He also had an actual scoring average in 2000 of 68.17 strokes, breaking Nelson's record of 68.33 strokes in 1945.   

Eldrick Tiger Woods, now 28 years of age, has had an amazing career since becoming a professional golfer in the late summer of 1996. He has won 52 tournaments, 39 of those on the PGA TOUR, including the 1997, 2001, and 2002 Masters Tournaments, 1999 and 2000 PGA Championships, 2000...

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Ted Hughes famously quoted "What excites...Ted Hughes famously quoted "What excites my imagination is the war between vitality and death". This is a key factor in the effectiveness of nearly all of Hughes' early work - the stark contrast between life and death, vitality and lethargy. In poems such as "The Jaguar", "Roarers in a Ring" and "Six Young Men", there is a severe and often brutally sudden transition between the two extremes. I found all of these poems, particularly "The Jaguar", intriguing and enthralling; the respect that Hughes has for animals and humans who live their lives to the full is admirably enormous. In "The Jaguar", the poet describes his disregard for the majority of the animals in the zoo he visits because they have accepted captivity and surrendered to a life free from care, excitement and interest. Most of the animals have lost the magic of their natural instincts. He disdainfully describes them with words like "indolence" and "sloth" and uses the simile "like cheap tarts" to describe the parrots. This insinuates that they are willing to "strut" and show off to anyone, as they have lost any sense of pride and self worth they once had. However, there is one creature that excites and captivates the crowds, and as the title of the poem suggests, has also left a lasting impact on Hughes. Instead of lazing around idly, the sleek black Jaguar "spins from the bars" and "hurries enraged". Despite being deprived of his natural environment and his freedom, the Jaguar is full of movement, actively bursting with power and energy. Hughes is markedly enthralled by the way that the Jaguar seems to create his own space, even within the confinement of his cage "“ describing the creature as having the world rolling "under the long thrust of his heel". Hughes uses powerful and potent images such as "the drills of his eyes" and "the prison darkness" to make the poem come alive. The poem has an underlining high regard for the Jaguar; it is clear he retains his sense of dignity and power and is still very much a wild beast. He has certainly not accepted his life in captivity. Hughes accentuates the difference between the Jaguar and the other animals by describing the reactions of the crowd, who stare mesmerised at the Jaguar "as a child at a dream". This simile is effective as it creates a real sense of awe and amazement; children cannot often be captivated so strongly, suggesting the subject is something truly incredible. Contrarily, he implies that the majority of the cages contain nothing but "sleeping straw", and visitors tend to rush past such animals without even noticing their existence. As well as the movements of the crowds, the difference between lively and lethargic is very much highlighted by the metaphorical language used. The curl of a snakes body is described as a fossil "“ not only appropriate because of the coiled shape but also because it gives the impression of being very old and in a state of inertia. Similarly, the apes are of no interest to the crowds because their only motions are idle actions to pass the time; they merely "yawn and adore their fleas in the sun". To my surprise, even the tigers and the lions are too "fatigued with indolence" to excite an audience. The simile "still as the sun" demonstrates the arrogance and immovability of the Lions, and also illustrates their colour. All these static, lazy images are countered by the rage, strength and ferocity of the Jaguar who does not limit his spirit to the boundaries of his cage. The pace and rhythm of the poem is quite fast with short sharp words, often monosyllable to stress the simplicity of the trouble-free animals. In contrast, the pace slows down in the third verse when talking about the Jaguar, with considerably longer sentences and words such as 'mesmerised'. "Roarers in a Ring" is a more subtle observation, in the form of a narrative. It is Christmas Eve and a group of farmers are attempting to conceal their sorrow with alcohol and false laughter. The situation the poet describes is immediately identifiable, making it all the more hard-hitting. The poem begins on a cold note, describing a starving fox - a symbol of the harsh realities of nature and death. Descriptions like "The moor foamed like a white running sea" create an atmosphere that is bleak, cold and uninviting. In the second verse the farmers huddle around a fire, which instead of sounding cosy, sounds as if they are hiding from the outside world. Later, it is suggested that their unceasing laughter is not genuine but is like a ball being tossed in the air. Instead of actually being happy they are forcing themselves to laugh because there is nothing else they can do, and ultimately because they are afraid. The poet talks as if he is watching them and says, "You would have thought that if they did not laugh, they must weep". He is saying that they are scared to drop the pretence of joviality, as they don't want to face the prospect of sober misery. Thinking rather than laughing loudly means they must realise what their fate is "“ "lest silence drink blood". In contrast to the way they toss laughter, and their lives up, towards the end of the poem there is a strong feeling of downward movement, with lines like "bottomless black silence through which it fell" and "blindly, rowdily balanced, took their fall". Despite their apparent liveliness, there is a constant undertone of sorrow. In the sixth verse the poet depicts how the farmer's "grand bellies shook" and then suddenly the line "Oh their flesh would drop to dust at the first sober look". This cruelly reminds the reader how vulnerable and weak they are compared to the sharpness of the "air new as a razor" and the power of the moor and the world in general. The poem draws to an end with the deaths of the farmers, and pointedly closes with the insignificance of this; as the world "went whirling still" "“ it carries on unchanged by their absence. Another of Ted Hughes' poems entitled "Six Young Men" displays a more direct change from descriptions of the life and the men's enthusiasm to their tragic deaths in the First World War. The poem observes a photograph taken forty years ago which pictures the six men who died only months later. The men's expressions are timeless and although the men are very much dead, the photo is undoubtedly alive The men were at the peak of their lives and the contrast between their vigour and anticipation with the tragedy of their death is shocking. Hughes describes each of the young men in turn by how they looked in a photograph, their beautiful surroundings, their camaraderie and lust for life itself. However, at the end of each verse, a brief yet cuttingly effective line reminds the reader of the men's fate "“ "their faces are four decades under the ground" ends the second verse and "Forty years rotting into soil" ends the fourth. This pattern is repeated, as the poet touchingly recalls how their clothes would not be fashionable today, but at the time their shoes shone, which reflects their respectability. It also makes an alarming contrast as in life they had taken pride in their appearance but in death, they have spent forty years "rotting in the soil". There is a more detailed description of how the men died and Hughes reveals that he knew them and also the scene in the picture. It makes the reader wonder what relationship he was to them. I speculated whether he had lost all these friends in the war. Was he the one behind the lens who had taken the picture? The poem reflects on the passing of time, and it is states that nothing lasts. The tone of the poem is bitter but invariably becomes more softly spoken when Hughes is recalling memories of the men going on a "Sunday jaunt". He reflects on the irony of their lives and talks about the "mangled last agony" one of the men suffered in hospital, while for some "nobody knows what they came to". In the last verse, the poet claims that "six celluloid smiles" are no less alive than any man, but at the same no less dead than a prehistoric creature. Hughes feels very strongly about the photograph; it is a paradox, a contradiction that that they should be smiling, when with hindsight he sees too many reasons why they should not. Hughes remembers them twice "“ in death shot by rifle or trying to save a friend, and preserved in his cherished photograph which has not wrinkled their faces or hands, and they live in his memory, young forever. All of these poems touch on "the contrast between vitality and death", either comparing the two directly, or focusing mainly on one of them. It is obvious that Hughes found victory in the untamed will of the Jaguar, and admiration for the remarkable lust each of the "Six young men" had for life "“ whereas he scorned at the farmers who led pitiful, timid lives which ended as uneventfully as they had existed.   

Ted Hughes famously quoted "What excites my imagination is the war between vitality and death". This is a key factor in the effectiveness of nearly all of Hughes' early work - the stark contrast between life and death, vitality and lethargy. In poems such as "The Jaguar", "Roarers in a...

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