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There are three poems I have chosen to help me discuss and write about my thesis 'Life , its problems, the good and the bad of human experience, are major concerns of Simon Armitage's poetry'. They are the Untitled poem "I am very bothered", "Poem" and "It Ain't What You Do, It's What It Does To You". "Poem" is one of Armitage's life problem poems When You don't remember the good things a person has done but the bad things a person has done you remember. This poem has many lines which start with 'and' which is a sort of list of things this person has done. Also he starts off the poem with "And if it snowed and snow covered the drive" which is like the poem is the second part of another poem or he has left out the beginning and got to the important part. There are three verses describing things he did. Mostly everything is good things about him for example "And for his mum he hired a private nurse" apart from the last sentence which describes him doing bad things for example "And twice he lifted 10 quid from her purse" Mother. This made the reader only remember the bad things because it was the last thing the reader remembers about him from the whole paragraph. The last verse is about how people rated him as a bad person who he was only occasionally like everyone else in the world. There was one sarcastic part of the poem when he said "every week he tipped his wage" and soon after said "what he didn't spend he saved" because he would not have nothing to save if he spent half on alcohol. I think Armitage's poems puts in these sarcastic bits and bad or wrong doings spread over the poem so you are al ways reminded he is a bad person but he is clearly an average person but people judge you on all the things you do so you should be careful on what you do. "I am very bothered" is a poem of the bad of human experiences. It's about what you do to try to attract attention which has good and bad consequences. Simon Armitage shows how he feels about his experiences when he looks back on them. He feels very troubled when he remembers a time when he was in school as a child in a science lab. He put a pair of plastic handled scissors over a hot Bunsen burner until it was soft and melting slowly and gave it to a female pupil. When she held it around her fingers he described the scene as "O the unrivalled stench of branded skin as you "¦" meaning it was so bad no other bad smell could compete with it and that it left a mark of dull, dark, black, burnt skin. There was a burnt ring around one of her fingers and one of her thumbs that were marked for life. He described his feelings of this horrific atrocity by saying "Don't believe me if I say that was just my butterfingered way at thirteen, of asking you if you would marry me" butterfingered way meaning not really meaning it, not seriously so he means don't believe be if I said I was only joking when I said will you marry me. Finally, the poem "It Ain't What You Do It's What It does To You" is about human experiences which are mainly good. It starts off with him not have gone to America with hardly anything but then say he has lived with thieves in Manchester which are both bas experiences in the first verse. In the second verse he talks about only one thing he hasn't done which is gone to the quiet, peaceful Taj Mahal "padded through Tag Mahal, barefoot". In the third verse he talks about only one thing he has done. Which is skimmed a flat stones across Black moss on a day so still he could hear every sound which is normally unheard of "hear each set of ripples". In the fourth verse he starts off with him not have sky dived from an aircraft but he says "I held the wobbly head of a boy at a day centre, and stroked his fat hands" which has a really big effect on your life to see someone in a bad state. All these examples shown of things done or things he hasn't done means he is saying our experiences effect our behaviour and ways of thinking and makes us more wiser on the things we do. Like In the final verse he describes the feelings of doing all those things inside of us as a "sense of something else" which I believe it's a feeling so out of this world that you have to do it to find out. All these poems we have studied show that Simon Armitage thinks deeply about humans and how they react to life experiences. Whether life experiences bring problems or happiness we all have to deal with them in the right way. For example from the poem 'Poem' the problem of the man only remembered by the bad points and that man has to deal with that in the right way by defending himself and the people who rate him also have to be careful on what they say about people. We have to try and live through it all without it bringing us down and making us feel miserable. For example 'The untitled poem about him very bothered about the girls burnt fingers we have to deal with the fact that it happened and to let it go and get on with our lives. We also have to make sure we don't make wrong decisions just to make ourselves feel happy and don't care about the others. For example again to the untitled poem Simon should of thought of the consequences and the pain of others but he didn't he was only seeking attention for himself. Now I hope you now know Simon Armitage poems are based on life's good and bad experiences.
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There are three poems I have chosen to help me discuss and write about my thesis 'Life , its problems, the good and the bad of human experience, are major concerns of Simon Armitage's poetry'. They are the Untitled poem "I am very bothered", "Poem" and "It Ain't What You Do, It's What It Does To You". "Poem" is one of Armitage's life problem poems When You don't remember the good things a person has done but the bad things a person has done you remember. This poem has many lines which start with 'and' which is a...
him very bothered about the girls burnt fingers we have to deal with the fact that it happened and to let it go and get on with our lives. We also have to make sure we don't make wrong decisions just to make ourselves feel happy and don't care about the others. For example again to the untitled poem Simon should of thought of the consequences and the pain of others but he didn't he was only seeking attention for himself. Now I hope you now know Simon Armitage poems are based on life's good and bad experiences.

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Oscar Wilde's comedy 'The... Oscar Wilde's comedy 'The Importance of being Ernest' is entwined around the concept of mistaken identity. It shows the irony of a group of friends, within a Victorian society, meddling with the truth to make themselves more appealing to each other. Jack Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff are good friends of an upper class society. Jack is known in the town as Ernest and in the country by his real name Jack. He is in love with Gwendolen Fairfax, who only knows him by 'Ernest'. In the country he is known as Jack and said to his ward Cecily Cardew there that Ernest is his mischievous brother in the town. Algernon too is in the game of deception. He brought to life a character called Bunbury that no one has met, whose health seems to be declining, to excuse him from engagements he has made. He also disguises himself as Jack's brother Ernest when he goes down to the country, where he falls in love with Cecily, who also only knows him as 'Ernest' and not by his true identity. Both men pretend to be called Ernest and both women want to be in love with a man called Ernest. The concept of identity is important in this satire as it brings humour to the play by mocking the intelligence of these upper class characters, but on the serious side exploits the irony and narrow mindedness of society. Both women in the play admire the name 'Ernest' as it brings to mind someone whose is 'earnest' and honest, yet both men are far from it. Jack and Algernon's preoccupation with the name Ernest is driven by their love for Gwendolen and Cecily who also are preoccupied with the name 'Ernest' believing that it prescribes the men earnest nature, 'my ideal has always been to love someone of the name of Ernest. There is something in the name that inspires confidence. The moment Algernon first mentioned to me he had a friend called Ernest, I knew I was destined to love you'. Wilde mocks them by showing how deep their love really is. The too women are only in love with the name, a superficial detail, before they have even met the men, and the men are willing to change theirs to impress! Algernon fabricated his 'invaluable permanent invalid' friend Bunbury to escape engagements in the town to visit him in the country. Lady Bracknell, his aunt, invites him to dine with her but he tells her he can't as Bunbury's condition is getting worse and needs to visit him in the country. However, adding to the humour, Lady Bracknell answers with the ironic 'I think that its high time that Mr Bunbury made up his mind whether he going to live or die"¦I should be obliged if you would ask Mr Bunbury"¦ to be kind enough not to have a relapse on Saturday, for I rely on you to arrange my music.' As if his illness is far less important than her reception. In Act I Jack proposes to Gwendolen. Jack is truly in love with her and she accepts his proposal but to his dismay exclaims 'My own Ernest' as if she is only accepting him on the basis that he is called Ernest. She knew she was destined to marry a man called Ernest before she had even met him. Jack is alarmed by this and uncertainty runs through his mind, 'you mean to day that you couldn't love me if my name wasn't Ernest"¦I think Jack, for instance, a charming name', the fact that he does not find insulating her un-satisfaction with the name Jack and preoccupation with the name Ernest adds to the humour ad further mocks the ignorance of the characters. Gwendolen assures that names actually bear some weight with regard to the determination of character forcing the audience to reassess whether she really loves Jack. Once Jack and Gwendolen's engagement was announced to her mother Lady Bracknell she found it to interrogate Jack to check his suitability for her daughter. In this scene Wilde explore the absurdity of the institution of marriage. It gives the impression that society only marries for status rather than love. Lady Bracknell is a good example of Oscar Wilde's cutting satire at work. She is arrogant, snobbish, conservative and obsessed with high culture and excellent behaviour. She is the perfect caricature of the stereotypical Victorian aristocrat woman. She investigates his wealth and social occupations. He fulfilled all her requirements regarding wealth and social activities yet the fact that he suffered a misfortune of losing both his parents was considered 'carelessness'. Mistaken identity plays its part in this scene where Jack does not know who his real parents are. His parents abandoned him as a baby at a train station. He was named after a seaside resort 'Worthing'. The way she vehemently disapproves of this is ironic as it was in fact her brother that lost the handbag. The fact the Jack and Gwendolen love each other seems to have no significance when his background and status do not approve. Act II is set in Jack's home in the countryside. Algernon comes down to the countryside pretending to be Jack's brother Ernest where he falls in love with Cecily. Cecily had fallen in love before she had even met him merely for the fact that she was in love with the name and with his 'wicked' behaviour. They engage in a flirtatious conversation before jack arrives at the house. When he arrives he is wearing mourning clothes for the death of his brother Ernest only to realise that Algernon had arrived before him pretending to be Ernest. However he still plays along in the identity game adding to the humour of the story. The audience by this point know all real identities of the characters and their mistaken identities so watching the characters meddle between themselves in confusion makes this humorous. Gwendolen and Lady Bracknell also arrive at the country house to add to the confusion. Her and Cecily reside in the garden to get to know each other. Gwendolen remarks that she likes Cecily and that her 'first impressions of people are rarely wrong' which is ironic when indeed she has got Jack completely wrong. Throughout the play Wilde has portrayed the upper class as ignorant and preoccupied with trivial and beautiful things. The dialogue between Cecily and Gwendolen is no exception. Merriman brings them their tea where they strongly disagree about preferences. Cecily offers her sugar but Gwendolen replies that 'sugar is not fashionable anymore' and when offered cake or bread and butter she replies 'cake is rarely seen at the best houses nowadays'. There could be nothing more trivial than having fashion in food. Cecily is irritated by Gwendolen's snobbish behaviour. Amidst this fatuous conversation they stumble upon the fact that they both engaged to Ernest Worthing. Although they don't yet realise they are engaged to different men they begin to argue. Before long they realise that they had been mistaken as Jack and Algernon both enter. At this point in the scene the two girls unite and mutiny against the two men who they supposedly love after they realise a 'gross deception' had been played on them. This is ironic and humorous in both cases. Cecily fell in love with 'Ernest' before she had met him for his wicked character yet when he was 'wicked' she did not love him anymore. Gwendolen believed she was a good judge of character and loved her 'Ernest' for his honest nature yet it was revealed to her that not is he not called Ernest and he was far from earnest in his character. However they all forgive each other as the two girly see that the two men were willing to christen themselves again for the one they loved, 'where questions of self-sacrifice are concerned, men are infinitely beyond us' Gwendolen states as the two men beg for their forgiveness. Finally in Act III Lady Bracknell arrives. Once again her interrogation of suitability continues as the conflicts that arose before are recalled regarding the issue of consent to marry and the importance of the name Earnest. She disapproves of Jack and Gwendolen's engagement yet approves of Cecily and Algernon's after she hears of Cecily's small fortune in funds as 'very few girls of the present day have any really solid qualities, any of the qualities that last, and improve with time'. This once again mocks the concept of marriage as it seems to absurdly be based on status and wealth rather than love. Wilde deliberately satirizes the entire institution. And when Algernon dismisses this idea as 'Cecily is the sweetest, dearest, prettiest girl in the whole world"¦and doesn't care twopence about social possibilities' Lady Bracknell warns him not to disrespect society as only 'people who can't get into it do that'. In this epigram Wilde portrays stereotype of the aristocracy of the Victorian society and their snobbish behaviour. However, Jack refuses to give consent for Cecily to marry Algernon if Lady Bracknell does not consent for Gwendolen to marry him. In the squabble it is found that it was Miss Prism that lost the bag in which Jack was found as a baby. In fact it is revealed that he is he Lady Bracknell's sisters' son. This is very ironic as at the beginning Lady Bracknell was disgraced at the fact that Jack was lost as a baby when in fact it was her own sister that had lost him! Jack finally finds out who he is and from whom he has come from. It is exposed that his Christian name really is by chance Ernest so the truth is he was earnest throughout after all. Throughout this play Wilde has used numerous devices to add to the humour of the play. Wilde's humour is fundamentally based on a particular dramatic irony, one in which the audience knows that the characters are ridiculously absurd, but the characters themselves are not aware of the fact at all. He mocks the principles of upper class Victorian society and their fashions. Especially on the tone of marriage by indicating that marriage is capriciously subject to all sorts of social factors rather than love. Wilde also uses epigrams as a means of humour. Sarcastic and witty lines, delivered mostly by Algernon and lady Bracknell, mocking the world around them. 'If I ever get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact'; 'divorces are made in heaven'; 'you don't seem to realize that in marriage, three is company and two is none' are example of some the manipulated clichés. Most of the epigrams abound in the dialogue are reversed conventional phrases, such as 'Marriage is made in heaven' and 'two is company three is a crowd'. They are manipulated traditional clichés that provide intellectual entertainment by showing how empty those clichés are. Wilde uses them to satirize the excess of the elite, but at the same time the ideas Algernon comes up with are not always far off reality. Jack presents us with a pun on the word earnest in the last line of the play as he says, 'I've now realized for the first time in my life, the Importance of Being Earnest.' The simple pun on being earnest and the name Ernest has been used throughout the play. It is important for Jack obviously to be 'Ernest' as Gwendolen otherwise will not want to marry him. However, at the same time that it is important to be earnest in nature. Ernest and Algernon were rewarded with marriage in the end. And although the play unwinds with neither meaning to act earnestly, they were in fact being completely honest the whole time. Ernest was Ernest and Algernon was Ernest's dashing brother. The final line of the play suggests to the audience that there is a different kind of earnestness, different from the stuffy arrogance of Lady Bracknell, an earnestness that allows for the inconsistencies and whims that inhibit mankind.   

Oscar Wilde's comedy 'The Importance of being Ernest' is entwined around the concept of mistaken identity. It shows the irony of a group of friends, within a Victorian society, meddling with the truth to make themselves more appealing to each other. Jack Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff are...

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Dulce Et Decorum est, written... Dulce Et Decorum est, written by Wilfred Owen is a very realistic and brutal poem about the First World War. In his poem he describes the terrible conditions of which many Soldiers had to live, fight and for many soldiers die in. This contrasts greatly with the poem The Soldier written by Rupert Brooke. The Soldier is a very passionate patriotic poem about The First World War. The Soldier was written at the beginning of The First World War, whilst the whole Country was full with enthusiasm and with a patriotic feel. Although Rupert Brooke wrote about the War, he himself never made it there as he died on the journey there. This again may be another reason for his enthusiasm, as he had never experienced the grim and harsh reality of War. Dulce Et Decorum est was written towards the very end of the War, where most of the Country was tired and bitter of fighting. Wilfred Owen, the writer of Dulce Et Decorum est, had fought in the War and had experienced the horrific conditions of War. This is maybe the reason he decided to use the highly ironic title Dulce Et Decorum Est, which is a famous line created by the well-known academic Horace. It means it is sweet and fitting to fight for your country. This has a great contrast to the poems tone and content. The content of both of these poems has great relevance to the First World War. The Soldier has great means of pride, patriotism and religious content: "In hearts at peace, under an English heaven". By concentrating on these elements, Rupert Brooke creates a very different poem to Dulce Et Decorum est. In the first stanza he writes of how if he were to die in war, a corner of a foreign field will be "for ever England." This is very patoratic as it shows the reader, that he has no fear. He follows by decribing England as a beautiful land full of freedom, "Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam." This again is very patoratic as it shows the readers,potential soldiers, that England is something worth fighting for. He starts his next stanza by describing his own psyical and mental fight for his country, "And think, this heart, all evil shed away." This shows how he is not jut fighting for his Country he is also fighting a mental battle within himself. He follows by describing himself as a "pulse in the eternal mind." Which shows he is well aware he is only a very small piece of a large plan.It could also mean he is in pulse with God and that he believes God is backing them.This gives the reader great confidence as it shows that if God is backing them they must be in the right and therefore they will win.He then finishes the poem by using strong passionate personification to describe England, "Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day."This is another form of patronism as it gives the reader great pride for England. In Wilfred Owen's poem his point of view on the War is very different. He writes about treacherous events vividly which causes very clear images: "Gas! Gas"¦yelling out and stumbling". This vivid explanation causes a very clear disturbing picture, which makes the reader think of those who fought for their Country and those who died doing it. This therefore sends the reader a very different view of war. He starts Dulce Et Decorum est by describing the shocking state of which all soldiers were in and the horrific condition which they lived and fought in, "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge." He then describes a vivid gas attack by using strong description and imagary, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! "“ An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling, And flound"ring like a man in fire or lime." This is very penetrating as the strong imagary make you imagine the shocking conditions and the sudden attack. This therefore makes the prospect of the war a reality. His last stanza starts by describing the attack effect of the gas attack, "His hanging face, like a devil"s sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs." This is very frightening for the reader as you can vividly imagine it. It would also be frightening if you had family or friends in the war as it is very easy to imagine the horrific death happening to one of them. In the final stanza, Owen enforces that, should readers see what he has seen, the government would cease to send young men to war, all the while instilling visions of glory in their heads. No longer would they tell them the old lie, "Dulce Et Decorum est." The language used in The Soldier has many different descriptive techniques. Rupert Brooke decides to use personification to describe England: "Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day". This effect echances the certain theme of patronism around the poem, this is because the reader thinks of England as a woman and therefore something worth fighting for. He also uses a few examples of alliteration which is very promanent in old English poems. Alliterations has a gratifying effect on the sound, which gives a reinforcement to stresses, and can also serve as a subtle connection or emphasis of key words in a line, "And laughter, learnt of friends; and geltleness". Dulce et Decorum est also includes very clever and effective descriptive words which creates imminant images. He uses imagery in his poem so he is albe to create a picture in the readers mind which is needed to feel the full force of the poem "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge." He also uses repetition, which is very effective and therefore creates a certain feel for the poem, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!" The tone of The Soldier is very different to the one of Dulce et Decorum as it has very different content. The Soldier has a very uplifting tone this is acheived by using patroatic and romantic content. It is also very optimistic as it ideailized England, this is very unrealistic. On the other hand the tone of Dulce et decorum est is very realistic as is it shows the true, depressing facts of war. Both of the poems impact the reader greatly as they are both written about the same topic,War.The Soldiers impacts the reader by showing a patoratic romantic view of the war. This impacts the reader as it shows great courage and the strong proud atmosphere which was drilled into everyone.On the other hand Dulce Et Decorum Est was written towards the very end of the War and impacts the reader by describing the horrific death of a soldier after being attacked by a gas bomb.This impacts the reader greatly as Wilfred Owen uses many strong language tecniques to create a vivid image. Although both poems are very much about World War One, they are both very different. The Soldier was written during the beggining of the war when the whole country was full with patronism and belief. This is the reason for its upbeat tone and optimism. It is full with religious and patroatic content which is created using strong personiication and descriptions.Dulce Et Decorum est was written towards the end of the War,this is the reason for its very harsh realistic view on the war. Wilfred Owen writes about the shocking conditions and how a fellow soldier died whilst he stood their helpless. He uses strong imagary to create vivid images in the readers mind.   

Dulce Et Decorum est, written by Wilfred Owen is a very realistic and brutal poem about the First World War. In his poem he describes the terrible conditions of which many Soldiers had to live, fight and for many soldiers die in. This contrasts greatly with the poem The...

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Topic: Hunting with Dogs Running...Topic: Hunting with Dogs Running for your life, but yet knowing deep inside you that you're going to be ripped limb from limb. The last thing you hear is your screams for help and the sound of cheering by a group of humans. The last thing you see is your killer's face covered in your blood. Some people call this morally wrong act of cruelty a 'sport'. It is turning into a more common 'sport' around the country and it needs to stop"¦not for the distant future, but NOW! Reports and tests show that 96.9% of animals hunted and then killed by dogs die a slow painful death due to their atrocious injuries. The other 3.1% of animals killed by dogs die from exhaustion and die more quickly from its injuries. Either way the hunted animal dies from the effects of being hunted. Surely this has to stop? "Why" do you say? Well 'why' do hunting packs only hunt foxes, deer's, hares and minks? I'll tell you why, its because these animals don't defend themselves against the hounds. They aren't strong enough to attack back. They just run, run as far as they can go, until the hounds catch up and kill them. Easy targets. More animals hunted in one go. Quick and 'effective' games. If this isn't cruelty to animals, then I don't know and can't see, what is! RSPCA, CPHA and LACS are the most highly praised organisations that try to prevent these hunting games from carrying on. They try to their highest ability to try and ban hunting with dogs, but sadly the government and the House of Lords are too strong and believe this morally wrong blood sport is perfectly 'normal'. They say the sport can go ahead because it keeps control over the numbers of Foxes, Deer's, Hares and Minks. However, studies show that the number of those animals doesn't need controlling and could decrease at alarming rates in the near future. If they thought this sport helps keep control and that it's the only way, well they're wrong! Scientists show that the only rightful way to keep control over the numbers of animals is not to hunt them with dogs but to shoot them with a type of tranquilliser which would cause the animal to die a quiet, non painful death. This is kind to the animal without the outrage of a bloodthirsty dog ripping them limb from limb. Are the government and the House of Lords being stubborn? Scared to face up to the situation and the blood sports team members? Among the supporters of hunting there is a fear that if it is banned there will be a severe shortage of jobs in rural areas. However I feel that this argument does not stand up in today's modern world with its very low overall unemployment rates. In addition to this the rapid increase in opportunities for working at home coupled with the advances in computer technology and the associated training courses available make it easier to replace any lost jobs. "Hunting is natural. Humans have been hunting since the moment we were created, so why stop now?" says Mr Robert Burns, a farmer from Somerset. Everybody aggress initially we were barbaric in nature but surely we're suppose to have progressively become more civilised. Or have we? Picture the scene: You're looking for food for your loved one and your 4 children. You hear a noise, which you've heard before, but you carry on hunting for food for your family. Then suddenly out of the bushes jump 15 hounds, thirsty for blood, your blood. You run until you can run no more; you collapse. Fighting for your breath, you try to get up but before you know it you're being ripped apart. You're dead. Your body is covered in blood and taken away by a human on a horse. Your skin to make clothes. Your flesh to be eaten by your killers. Your bones crushed to mark various items. Your family is left to starve. Your family is dead. But worse the, perpetrators revel in it. The question we need to ask is, who are the real animals, the Foxes, Deer's, Hares and Minks, or US? Let us make positive steps to change this situation by getting the law changed to ban hunting with dogs.  

Topic: Hunting with Dogs Running for your life, but yet knowing deep inside you that you're going to be ripped limb from limb. The last thing you hear is your screams for help and the sound of cheering by a group of humans. The last thing you see is...

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