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Shakespeare uses various techniques to create different moods and atmospheres and to reveal the characters. He uses comparisons in characters, the use of language and the use of tension. It is one of the most important scenes as it is where Romeo and Juliet first meet and where we learn the most about main characters. Being an important scene, Shakespeare has made it very tense and entertaining. The scene includes a lot of main key characters and we learn of the differences between the two families. The audience are already looking forward to this scene, as we want to find out about and see Rosaline! We are expecting fun as it is a party and want to know what happens with Juliet and Paris; will she marry marry him when she is of an older and more mature age? Before this scene we found information about various main characters. The audience found out that Romeo was in love with Rosaline at the very beginning and he was love sick and distraught with not seeing her. Romeo had had a dream the night before about a bad thing happening at the Capulet's party. Being Romeo he believed his own thoughts and was nervous about going. We also found out that Juliet, only 13 years of age, was the only daughter of the Capulet's. She has her own 'nurse' to look after her as she is not very mature and relies on other people. Juliet is very distant from the rest of her family and does not get on with them the most majority of the time; she is a lonely child. Capulet wanted Juliet to marry Paris, a rich older man but only when Juliet was older. Capulet is a strong character, he tries to keep the peace between his family and the Montagues, but if the Montagues start a fight first then he will want to carry it on, as he doesn't want to be seen as the loser. Finally Tybalt, he is the nephew to Lady Capulet and despises the Montague's and tries his hardest to start fights with them and will never hear a bad word spoken about him. Immediately before this scene, the atmosphere is very gloomy as Romeo had a dream about a bad thing happening at Capulet's party, this also gets us interested, as we want to find out if he is right and what will happen. At the opening of scene 5 Capulet's servants prepare for his party. The atmosphere is very busy, rushed and fast moving. All of the servants are rushing around preparing for the party. They all talk to each other in short sentences; "You are look'd for, and call'd for, ask'd for"¦" This key line shows the short, snappy words the servants used. 'For' is repeatedly used as they are rushed and just use it as a joining word to get their sentence across before rushing off to prepare more things for the party once more. The apostrophes are repeated in all three words as it shows they are rushed even in their speech; they have to shorten words to say what they wanted quicker; they can't finish sentences and even words! They do not have the time to stand and chat especially under the watchful eye of Capulet; they have too much to do for everything to be ready for when the party begins. Capulet then welcomes guests into the party and tries to get them to dance. The atmosphere is very humorous, as people are all in fancy dress; it is very vibrant, lively and very cheerful as people are having fun. "Welcome Gentlemen, Ladies that have their toes unplagued with corns"¦" Capulet repeats the word 'Welcome', this tells us that he is very pleased that everyone has come and he may have had too much to drink and forgets that he has already said it! Capulet is eager to get the party off to a flying start and he teases all the ladies by telling they are welcome to attend his party if they have nice feet! Capulet adds a jolly atmosphere to the party. Once the party had got going, Romeo arrived and glimpses Juliet for the first time; the atmosphere was very romantic and slow. "What Lady's that which doth enrich the hand"¦" Romeo compares Juliet to jewels, ""¦As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear-"¦"which shows he thinks very highly of her, he uses "What Lady's that which doth enrich the hand"¦"in describing her as special. He immediately falls in love with her and we see a different side to Romeo, his mood and feelings go from one extreme to the other, as he was totally in love with Rosaline but with one sight of Juliet he is head over heals in love with her, which is very typical of Romeo. The effect on the audience is that we are privileged to share such an intimate moment between Romeo and Juliet. After Romeo and Juliet met, Tybalt overhears Romeo talking about Juliet and was angry that a Montague had come to the Capulet's own party. An argument started between him and Capulet, Tybalt wanted to fight Romeo outside and told one of the servants to go and get his sword but Capulet stopped him and didn't want any fight at his party and told him to leave it. The atmosphere was very tense and violent; Tybalt was very aggressive towards Capulet and anyone who helped try and stop him from fighting. ""¦Fetch me my rapier, boy"¦" This suggests he has no respect for his servants and people around him; he speaks as he is higher up than everyone else and uses the word 'boy' to show his power over them. Tybalt is impulsively violent; he acts first and thinks later, as he tries his hardest to start fights between him and the Montagues. It tells us he really wanted to fight Romeo. Capulet scolds Tybalt and he leaves the party sowing revenge. Tybalt was very angry that Romeo turned up, " He shall be endured"¦" Capulet is asserting his authority, as he wouldn't let him do anything about it. Capulet is being very naïve, as he thinks he has solved the problem. The atmosphere went from being very tense and un-settled to the audience finally having a breath of relief as the tense atmosphere is over. After Tybalt had left, Romeo and Juliet meet for the first time and end up kissing. The atmosphere is very romantic, as if it is slow motion because the camera focuses and continually flicks between Romeo and Juliet. "If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine,"¦" Romeo is very eager to impress, he is pleased that he had got to be with Juliet after wanting to all night. Juliet responds in the same way, she is very flattered and equally eager to impress. Whilst Romeo and Juliet were kissing Juliet's nurse interrupted them, the atmosphere is very rushed and happens very rapidly. Unfortunately, Romeo finds out that Juliet is a Capulet and is disappointed, as he knows he will never be able to be with her with people knowing because of their family differences, ""¦My life is my foe's debt." Romeo does not understand how Juliet could be a Capulet, he was very upset at first, and he was in the hands of his enemy. The audience get anxious because of Romeo finding out she is his foe and the atmosphere gets very apprehensive. The audience feel depressed that Romeo and Juliet cannot be together with their family despising each other even though they know there could be love between them. Finally after Romeo finds out Juliet is a Capulet; vice versa for Juliet; she finds out Romeo is a Montague. The atmosphere is very playful and menacing, as Romeo and Juliet are still hopeful for being with one another from the bad news, as they know they want to be together and do not care about the consequences of being together. They were both very shocked and heartbroken about being enemies but they are not as naïve as their family and can see through differences and see love comparisons. Juliet refers to graves, which is a sign of bad things about to happen; we could interoperate as death! "My grave is like to be my wedding bed." Juliet may be thinking ahead, if she married Romeo her family would disown her and she may as well be dead to them. She also may be thinking if she married Paris, she would be very unhappy. She doesn't want to marry him but she wants to make Capulet and her family happy. She knows she would have a bad life and would think of it as her deathbed! In Act 1 scene 5, he brings across the characteristics and their personalities and uses a lot of tension. Tybalt for example, when the atmosphere got tense because of Romeo being at the party, Tybalt lost his cool and started getting angry, which gives the audience his real personality. Shakespeare creates different moods and reveals different characters because of Act 1 scene 5 is such an important scene. We know about some of the characters personalities but he shows us more, getting the audience looking forward to the scene from the tense build-up from the scene before. He uses the two families to bring across the differences and personalities; this is how he creates different moods; mostly being tense. He reveals different aspects of the main characters.
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Shakespeare uses various techniques to create different moods and atmospheres and to reveal the characters. He uses comparisons in characters, the use of language and the use of tension. It is one of the most important scenes as it is where Romeo and Juliet first meet and where we learn the most about main characters. Being an important scene, Shakespeare has made it very tense and entertaining. The scene includes a lot of main key characters and we learn of the differences between the two families. The audience are already looking forward to this scene,...
the party, Tybalt lost his cool and started getting angry, which gives the audience his real personality.

Shakespeare creates different moods and reveals different characters because of Act 1 scene 5 is such an important scene. We know about some of the characters personalities but he shows us more, getting the audience looking forward to the scene from the tense build-up from the scene before.

He uses the two families to bring across the differences and personalities; this is how he creates different moods; mostly being tense.

He reveals different aspects of the main characters.

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William Shakespeare's 'The Tempest,'... William Shakespeare's 'The Tempest,' was first performed in 1611 and was the last play that Shakespeare wrote. The main character, Prospero is thought to be a representation of Shakespeare as he controls all of the characters in the play just as Shakespeare controls the characters in his scripts also at the end of the play, Prospero asks the audiences' permission to leave the stage in the epilogue, this could be seen as Shakespeare announcing his retirement: "Let your indulgence set me free." The play suggests many differences between the primitive Caliban and the civilised Prospero. We see these on a number of occasions throughout the play as the two, very different personalities clash. Caliban is a portrayed as a primitive man, He acts on instinct and his basic urges to eat, sleep and reproduce. We see this when we learn why Prospero keeps Caliban as a slave. The audience would empaphise with Caliban, as he is very innocent although bestial. Whereas Caliban has no urge or desire for material possession or power, Prospero does. Prospero ideally sums up the civilised as he is educated and knows right from wrong. Prospero has lived in a world governed by laws whereas Caliban has only ever known his island, where there are no rules. Calibans first appearance on stage is in Act 1 Scene 2. As, he approaches Prospero; he immediately curses him using an image taken from nature. This shows the audience of the hate between Prospero and Caliban. We know this because Prospero previously calls Caliban a 'tortoise,' so he is referring him to an animal, and the curses that Caliban uses: "A south-west blow on ye, And blister you all o'er." For Elizabethan times, the curses that Caliban directs to Prospero would be very severe and insulting. All of the curses are images taken from nature as Caliban refers to the wind, wildlife and dew on the ground. These images show that Caliban lives in harmony with nature and the island, and loves everything about wildlife: "As wicked dew"¦ "¦Ravens feather." Prospero responds to Caliban by punishing him by threatening to order his spirits to hurt him in his sleep. Prospero treats Caliban, as a worthless creature that he feels should have no liberties, for what he tried to do to his beautiful Miranda. Even before this event though, Prospero didn't treat Caliban as equal, although he taught him about the world, he kept him as a pet. Now Caliban is forced to be a slave to Prospero who dismisses all curses Caliban and returns his own dehumanising insults: "Hag-seed, hence"¦ Abhorred slave" Caliban has lived on the island all of his life as he was born there. His mother, Sycorax, who was a wickedly evil witch used to rule over the island but has since passed away. Caliban is also said to be the son of the Devil. This is why Caliban has a disfigured appearance and has no idea of rules and boundaries. After Sycorax died had died, Caliban had become the ruler of the island, as there was just him and the spirits living there in harmony. When Prospero arrived on the island he used his magic to demand power and with this usurped the position of leader of the island from Caliban, much to the anger of the native. At first, Prospero taught Caliban language and how to understand life. Caliban was treated as if he was a pet: " And teach me how to name the bigger light." As Miranda grew up there were no real clashes between Caliban and Prospero until Miranda reached her early teens. Caliban's primitive, instinctive urges led him to attempting to rape Miranda. Prospero was enraged by this and ever since has forced Caliban into being a slave using the spirits to taunt him if he disobeys. Caliban is forced to live in a dark cave and has to collect food and wood for Prospero and his daughter. Caliban would feel very bitter about his and that he has lost his island: "This islands' mine by Sycorax my mother." Prospero views himself as the beautiful white European and as Caliban is indigenous, he is looked upon by Prospero as ugly and different as he is not the same as Prospero's ideal. A reason for this is colonial arrogance. During the time this play was performed many British explorers were venturing to new shores around the world and setting up new colonies using the natives as labour or use them to help themselves. Prospero is just like these explorers who tries to utilise the skills of the indigenous people. I would cast Caliban as having dark tanned skin being played by a beautiful attractive man, just to emphasise the prejudice of Prospero: "Freckled whelk"¦ "¦Filth as thou art" Caliban would wear gowns made of natural materials. E.g leaves bark. He would also wear a shawl of what once was Prospero's, to show the audience that Prospero once respected him: "Thou strok'st me, and made Much of me." When Caliban has a soliloquy he would speak clearly and gently, to show his sensitive side but in the presence of Prospero his anger would engulf him and he would growl and snarl. Hen would walk with a slight limp, a sign of when the spirits hurt him, and crouched, as his cave is very small and cramped: " Caliban snarling Caliban cowering" Caliban would always look innocent to gain sympathy from the audience. After the Tempest, the crew of the ship became washed up on the shore of the island in a number of small groups. Stephano and Trinculo believe that they could make some money out of the being back in Europe: "Were I in England now As I once was And had this fish painted: not a holiday Fool there but give a piece of silver." Shakespeare is poking fun at the Elizabethan desire for spectacle and hard-heartedness. Caliban would be in awe of the two strangers especially Stephano as Caliban views him as his new leader and as his God, who has been sent from heaven "Hast thou not dropp'd from heaven?" Caliban would throw himself at the feet of Stephano in awe as if he is a God, and Caliban a forever-loyal servant. This shows how gullible he is and Shakespeare implies how Elizabethans believed in myths and legends. Caliban would circle Stephano and distance himself from Trinculo. He would hang on Stephano's every drunken word and spit at the ground where Trinculo has stood. Trinculo feels ashamed that he was scared of the savage and now he is jealous of Caliban that Stephano is paying more attention to Caliban. Stephano feels very special and important when Caliban is being very sycophantic towards him: "I'll kiss thy foot." Caliban uses imagery connecting them to the heavens as he refers to Stephano as a 'brave God,' or deity and he views the alcohol as if it has been sent from the heavens: "celestial liquor." Caliban offers his only gift to Stephano in showing him the island. He offers himself to Stephano and curses Prospero: " A plague upon the tyrant that I serve." The word 'tyrant,' implies that Prospero exercises power in a harsh, cruel manner. Caliban sings and rejoices at the thought of no longer having to be a servant to Prospero. We know that Caliban loves the island because of his knowledge of the island and the imagery of nature that he uses. We can see that he is grateful that can finally show his love for his home. In Act 3 Scene 2 Caliban plots with Stephano and Trinculo to usurp Prospero from power and leadership of the island. As this takes place though, Ariel, Prospero's spirit servant plays a trick on the scheming group. I would stage this scene as the group on one side of the stage in a huddle with Trinculo nonchalantly leaning up against a tree mimicking Caliban's comments in a jealous way. On the other side of the stage there would be a large rock. Ariel would hide behind this and when he would speak he would peek his head over the top so that the audience realise that it is Ariel. Ariel would call Caliban a liar, hide behind his rock and laugh with the audience at the unfolding events. This would be a joke between Ariel and the audience but the other three wouldn't have any idea what is going on. This is effective use of dramatic irony. We learn even more of the hatred of Prospero by Caliban in this scene. Caliban calls Prospero a tyrant and claims that he cheated the island from him. Caliban describes Prospero to Stephano and Trinculo as an evil sorcerer and he intends to kill Prospero and help Stephano to claim the island. I would stage Caliban as when he talks about Prospero to talk with bitter anguish in his voice and act very aggressively and perhaps he could punch a tree as he describes the ways that they could kill Prospero in his sleep: "Batter his skull, or paunch Him with a stake, or cut, His wezand with thy knife." These acts of violence emphasise the deep hatred that Caliban has for Prospero, he even believes that the spirits dislike him. Saying this could help get the audience on Calinban's side by trying to portray Prospero as a bad person. We learn about Caliban's personality in this scene as the audience are shown of his intelligence when he tells the others of the best time and way to kill Prospero, by seizing his magic books. Caliban thinks Prospero is nothing without his magic and would stand no chance against the three men. He detests how Prospero can enchant the spirits into serving him through blackmail and false hope in the case of Prospero telling Ariel he would be free from duties. Towards the end of the scene, Ariel plays a tune on his tabor and pipe. This scares Stephano and Trinculo as they can hear music that is played by nobody. Caliban reassures the men that it is normal on the island to hear delightful music and gives a speech about it using imagery of soft sleep and dreaming along with beautiful instruments and light clouds to show his sensitive side and how he lives in harmony with the island as he often enjoys the delicate sounds of the spirits. The speech shows that the island is a very beautiful, fascinating place that is full of magical goings-on. Even with Prospero ruling over the island. In conclusion, I feel that Caliban has been the most interesting character in the play through the way Shakespeare has used Caliban's language use and innocence to portray a good indication of what a 'tamed,' savage being would be. I admire Caliban as he has not lost faith in his beautiful island and he will fight for what he believes in/against, even when it involves being subjected to physical pain. He even shows how sensitive and intelligent he can be even if he is usually aggressive and can sometimes act bestial: " I cried to dream again." I think that Prospero was wrong to treat Caliban as a slave and although Caliban tried to rape Miranda, Prospero treats him badly and unfairly, as Caliban knew no better than to rely on his basic, primitive urges. I agree that Caliban should have been punished so that he can learn what is right and wrong, but on not such a severe scale. Prospero views him as a Devil who cannot be changed, but when Prospero arrived on the island he must have thought differently because he taught him the ways of life: "A devil, a born devil." Caliban realises that he has chosen to worship the wrong person when Stephano is only interested in possessions where Caliban is unmaterialistic and he does not want to hurt anyone or cause suffering, he just wants his island. 'The Tempest,' raises the issue of colonial arrogance, which is relevant today, just as it was in Elizabethan times. Still, today, there are many 'Prospero's,' who visit different cultures and believe the natives are different and therefore do not give them or their culture a chance. We learn in the end that the prejudiced people in the world will get what they deserve as in this case, the audience sees Prospero as quite a manipulative figure.   

William Shakespeare's 'The Tempest,' was first performed in 1611 and was the last play that Shakespeare wrote. The main character, Prospero is thought to be a representation of Shakespeare as he controls all of the characters in the play just as Shakespeare controls the characters in his scripts...

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The theme that is brought... The theme that is brought up early in this play is "fate and predestination". This was very much part of the Protestant belief at the time of Macbeth. Ones future was mapped out to a certain extent ultimately leading to salvation or damnation. In Macbeth's case it was damnation and failure. This theme was displayed early in the play. Macbeth and Banquo have recently been in a tough battle with rebels and have won the victory for Scotland. Duncan rewards Macbeth for his courage by giving him the title 'Thane of Cawdor'. This title previously belonged to one who was a 'most disloyal traitor' so it seems Macbeth was destined to become one himself. But Duncan himself does not tell Macbeth. He is told by three witches he meets on the 'lonely moor'. Macbeth is surprised to be told by the witches but even more so when they proclaim he will be King: Act 1 Scene 3 "First Witch All hail Macbeth, hail to thee, Thane of Glamis Second Witch All hail Macbeth, hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor Third Witch All hail Macbeth, that shall be King here after." However, certain issues must be raised. The question has to be asked "“ "Are the witches predicting his future or are they trying to manipulate him into doing something he would regret?" The witches may have been told by someone about Macbeth receiving the honour of being Thane of Cawdor before the information got to him. Macbeth was destined to fail as soon as he thought about being King. Thinking about being would have made him exercise thoughts about killing Duncan in order to be King more quickly. In those days it was believed that the Monarch was appointed by God and therefore any attempt to usurp the Monarch was sacrilegious. This is made clear to us when Duncan's sons discover their father dead. McDuff says: Act 2 Scene 3 "Confusion now hath made his masterpiece Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope The Lord's appointed temple and stole thence The life o'th'building." McDuff says that the life of the 'Lord's anointed temple' has been stolen. He means that Duncan was the life of God and this life was stolen because he is dead. This shows a strong belief that Kings were appointed by God. This belief is called "The Divine Rights of Monarchs" and once again shows that Macbeth was destined to fail when he killed Duncan. Macbeth's moral dilemma when considering murdering Duncan, and the religious terminology he uses illustrates how he knows that the act he is considering is immoral and that he will be punished accordingly. However he is still seduced by offers of greatness. He says: Act 1 Scene 7 "But in these cases We still have judgement here that we but teach Bloody instructions, which being taught, return To plague th'inventor" Even though he will receive greatness for murdering Duncan, it will come back to haunt him or he might even be killed himself. This once again shows that Macbeth was destined to fail. It is obvious to us that Macbeth is attracted to the idea of murdering Duncan but he knows it is an evil act: Act 2 Scene 1 "Nature seems dead"¦ wicked dreams"¦ Witchcraft celebrates Pale Hecate's off'ring"¦ Withered murder"¦ wolf"¦ howl's"¦ Tarquin's Ravishing strides"¦ ghost" All of these things represent evil and it shows what was going through Macbeth's mind. Even still he contemplated murdering Duncan. This shows that he was once again destined to fail. The murder of Duncan and the upsetting of the pre-ordained order is illustrated symbolically by the in incident with the owl and the falcon: Act 2 Scene 4 "old man 'Tis unnatural, Even like the deed that's done on Tuesday last At a falcon tow' ring in her pride of place Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed" This is showing that the less powerful and important is killing the more powerful and important. It is a parallel to Macbeth killing Duncan. Macbeth usurped Duncan's position and this is unnatural or wrong occurrence. Macbeth is defying the natural order and therefore defying God therefore he will be punished and this punishment will be failure. This manifestation of God's will was central to the belief system of Low Church Christians in the early 17th Century, of which James I was one. This play serves as a warning to those wanting to kill the monarch at the time of the play. The Gunpowder Plot is referred to at the beginning of Act 2 Scene 3: "Knock, knock. Who's there in th'other devils name? Faith, here's an equivocator that could swear in both the Scales against either scale, who committed treason Enough for God's sake, yet could not equivocate to Heaven. O, come in, equivocator." The Porter seems to be referring to the Jesuit father Garnet, who tried to save his life with his specious arguments but who was executed in 1606 for complicity in the Gunpowder Plot. He especially refers to the Jesuit priest's equivocal oaths when he says "for God's sake". The plotters were condemned and this is parallel to Macbeth being condemned "“ his madness and suffering along with that of his wife are symbolic of the punishment awaiting the traitors. His punishment comes in several ways. Firstly he cannot sleep at night, secondly he keeps visualising the ghost of Banquo and thirdly and ultimately he himself is killed. James I defeating the plotters and Malcom and McDuff defeating Macbeth are examples of the theme good versus evil. If good were not to prevail then the whole socio-cultural fabric that underpinned 17th Century life would be destroyed making society unstable. This is proved in the years following the death of James I. His successor Charles I was impeached and he was eventually executed after the Civil War. Also the governments of the Interregnum and the Protectorate had failed.   

The theme that is brought up early in this play is "fate and predestination". This was very much part of the Protestant belief at the time of Macbeth. Ones future was mapped out to a certain extent ultimately leading to salvation or damnation. In Macbeth's case it was damnation...

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William Blake was very different to...William Blake was very different to other men, he grew up to hate the church although he was very religious. His family and himself were Dissenters, a breakaway denomination against the rulings of the church of England. From an early age Blake was different, he refused to go to school and was taught by his mother and spent a lot of his time reading the Bible as the dissenters took a very literal grasp on the teachings of the bible. As Blake grew older he considered cruelty to children one of the worst things imaginable as to him childhood was sacred and should be treasured as it is a state of innocence as far as he thought. Blake was a firm believer in opposing forces, good and evil, innocent and guilty and he believed there were two contrary states to the human soul two sides. Blake believed childhood to be the most precious thing, to be so innocent and to see children sold to people to become chimney sweeps just made him very angry. Blake was living around the time of the industrial revolution and witnessed the London he loved turn into a commercial city. Blake used to walk miles across London each day and many images and words in his poetry came from the industrial revolution as in some metaphors he uses tools to explain what he sees is going on as you see in The Tyger "What the hammer? What the chain?"¦.What the anvil". Blake also disliked authority like the monarchy and the army as he doesn't like the fact that a small percentage of the country decide whether or not the country goes to war which he is also against. This was at the same time as the French revolution which he wanted to happen in this country. Blake loved small villages and hates large towns and cities as just through his time in London the population grew massively. Blake was very artistic from an early age and when he was fourteen he was put to work as an apprentice of the engraver James Basire. Blake had a very vivid imagination and he saw visions, for instance when he was four he saw god and when he was eight he saw angels in a tree. In 1782, Blake married Catherine Boucher, who proved a devoted wife. In 1784 they set up a print-sellers' shop with another engraver and Blake's brother, Robert, who died in 1787. Here are two poems from Blake's most famous books, The first poem is from "Songs of Innocence" and is called "The Nurses Song" and the second poem is from Blake's other book "Songs of Experience" and is also called "The Nurses Song". When the voices of children are heard on the green And laughing is heard on the hill, My heart is at rest within my breast And everything else is still. "Then come home, my children, the sun is gone down "And the dews of night arise, "Come, come, leave off play, and let us away "Till the morning appears in the skies." "No, no, let us play, for it is yet day "And we cannot go to sleep; "Besides in the sky the little birds fly "And the hills are all cover'd with sheep." "Well, well, go & play till the light fades away "And then go home to bed." The little ones leaped & shouted & laugh'd And all the hills echoed. The Songs of Innocence book is one of Blake's books of poetry based on childhood and the innocence of childhood as shown in the above poem. The Songs of Experience is another poetry book written by Blake. Songs of Experience uses the same lyric style, and often uses the same titles and themes as in Songs of Innocence, but perverting the sing-song rhythms so that they seem sinister and resonant with a darker meaning. Here is the "Nurse's Song" from Songs of experience- When the voices of children are heard on the green And whisp'rings are in the dale, The days of my youth rise fresh in my mind, My face turns green and pale. Then come home my children, the sun is gone down, And the dews of the night arise; Your spring & your day are wasted in play, And your winter and night in disguise. This poem is based on the same thing but different through a pessimists point of view. The poems we are analyzing by Blake are "The Chimney sweeper" and "London". Both of these poems are based on childhood. "The Chimney sweeper" is a poem about a young chimney sweeper through that child's eyes. He says that when he could barely talk, after his mother died he was sold to be a chimney sweeper and now he sleeps in soot and sweeps chimneys. He says he has a friend with lovely hair like from a lambs back Blake sees a lamb as a very innocent creature which was shaved off and the boy said to that boy at least the soot can not spoil your hair if you have no hair. I think this was a small attempt at humour to lighten up this dark poem. His friend had a dream that all of his friends "Dick, Joe, Ned and Jack were all lock'd up in coffins of black" which means he saw a vision of all of his friends dead in the chimneys. Then came along an angel with a key and set them free and they went running down a green field leaping and laughing and then they wash in a river and shine in the sun. "Then naked and white, all their bags left behind, They rise upon clouds and sport in the wind." These are all visions of innocence. "Then the angel told Tom if he'd be a good boy, He'd have god for his father and never want joy" This means that as long as you are good you will still go to heaven no matter how bad your life may be. "And so Tom awoke and rose in the dark and got with our bags and our brushes to work, Tho' the morning was cold, Tom was happy and warm, So if all do their duty they need not fear harm." This means that Toms dream made him feel warm inside and as long as they do their work they need not fear harm and will go to heaven. Blake's poetry is not what you would expect from a professional poet as the themes and rhyming are like that of a child although the messages go far deeper than the words. The Chimney Sweeper means that a child is innocent and incapable of impurity and it is not their fault if their childhood is ruined, it is a waste at the fault of adults. The other William Blake poem I am going to analyse is called "London" and the funny thing about this poem is it is as relevant today as it was back in Blake's day. Blake loved London and he hated to see it destroyed during the industrial revolution. The poem starts with "I wander thro' each charter'd street" which means every street he walks through is mapped to be something else and be changed to something sinister and evil and not what the spirit of London is about. "And marks in every face I meet, Marks of weakness, marks of woe." This means everyone he sees shows the strain of life on their faces, it could mean they are sad and unhappy or it could mean that everyone has cuts and dirt on their face from having to work long hours to keep their families eating through these dark times. Blake then proceeds to use very harsh words and imagery "In every cry of every man, In every infants cry of fear, In every voice, in every ban, The mind forged manacles I hear." This says that in every voice he hears mind forged manacles a form of handcuffs which means everyone feels like they're tied down, in their minds they are not free to do what they wish Then he says that every time a chimney sweeper cries the church is appalled by it. This shows his sympathy for children and shows his hatred for the church and then manages to say things about the other things he hates, the monarchy and the army. "And the hapless soldier's sigh Runs blood down palace walls." This means the soldiers sigh, maybe a last breath of a soldier runs blood down palace walls, which might mean it is the palace the monarchy's fault because in these times the Monarch rules the country. In the last paragraph he says "But most thro' midnight streets I hear How the youthful harlet's Blasts the newborn infants tear And blights with plagues the marriage hearse." This means at midnight he hears a young prostitute screaming at her newborn child making it cry and that marriage brings about a plague that will kill you. This last statement I think is a bit hypocritical of Blake as he was happily married for years. The next two poems are from around two hundred and fifty years on when there were things bought in to make children"s life better although both of the next poems prove otherwise. The systems bought in were the Welfare State which was supposed to provide money for children living in poverty and many other schemes to improve children's quality of life. The first of these two poems is called Tich Miller written by Wendy Cope in the 1950's. This poem is about a girl talking about a poor under nourished girl who is unpopular and very unfit. She wore cheap NHS glasses with cheap pink frames. She had clubfoot which was a common disease back then when one foot grew to be larger than the other. She was always picked last for games and sports with the girl who is talking who was picked before Tich because she was "the lesser dud" although there was usually an argument "Have Tubby!" "No, no, Have Tich" When they were eleven they went to different schools and the girl who was telling the story "learned to get my own back sneering at hockey players who couldn't spell." The poem ends with a dramatic sentence- "Tich died when she was twelve". I considered this to be quite curt and cold and reminded me for some reason of the NHS smoking adverts which you are paying attention during the whole thing but at the end when you hear the person you have just seen or read about dies it really makes you think, it must be so terrible. This poem says in a sly way all of these systems and programs bought in only work in small ways to people, like Tich Millers glasses helped a little but she still went hungry and under nourished. The next poem written in the 1950's I am going to analyse is Timothy Winters by Charles Causley. This poem is a lot like Tich Miller in the way that a poor child goes to school who desperately needs help. I starts by saying "Timothy Winters goes to school with eyes as wide as a football pool." That is a simile suggesting he doesn't get enough sleep, the rhyming is tight and simple like a nursery rhyme. Timothy Winters had "Ears like bombs and teeth like splinters, A blitz of a boy was Timothy Winters" He uses war images to describe his features. Timothy is a very filthy boy with bad hair, bad clothes and holes in his trousers. He doesn't pay attention to the teacher as he is day dreaming "and shoots down the arithmetic bird"-he can't add up. "He licks the pattern off his plate" He eats every morsel on his plate as he is so hungry and starving. "He hasn't even heard of the Welfare State" The Welfare State was supposed to help children like Timothy. Timothy's shoes had holes in which made his feet bleed. He lives in a new council estate. He sleeps in a sack on the kitchen floor although there aren't supposed to be boys like him any more. Timothy's father was an alcoholic and his mother ran off with a bombardier, His grandmother is probably an alcoholic too and they give Timothy an aspirin to shut him up. The welfare worker lays awake feeling sorry for Timothy although she can't do anything about it because "The laws as tricky as a ten foot snake." At morning prayers the subject is unfortunate children and Timothy yells A men louder than anyone as if he wants god to hear him. This is another depressing poem about children more unfortunate and the sad thing is it can still happen today. The suffering by those in William Blake's days I am sure though was much worse than those in the 1950's and today as there was no help or laws for the benefit of children. The poems from Blake's day were so different to those from the fifties though the message was very alike. The language, rhyming and punctuation was very different in Blake's time to in the fifties when it is more or less the same today. The one thing these poems have in common is that all of them are poems about unfortunate children and all of the poems are trying to get this suffering recognised and stopped.  

William Blake was very different to other men, he grew up to hate the church although he was very religious. His family and himself were Dissenters, a breakaway denomination against the rulings of the church of England. From an early age Blake was different, he refused to go to school...

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