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Shakespeare uses various techniques to create different moods and atmospheres and to reveal the characters. He uses comparisons in characters, the use of language and the use of tension. It is one of the most important scenes as it is where Romeo and Juliet first meet and where we learn the most about main characters. Being an important scene, Shakespeare has made it very tense and entertaining. The scene includes a lot of main key characters and we learn of the differences between the two families. The audience are already looking forward to this scene, as we want to find out about and see Rosaline! We are expecting fun as it is a party and want to know what happens with Juliet and Paris; will she marry marry him when she is of an older and more mature age? Before this scene we found information about various main characters. The audience found out that Romeo was in love with Rosaline at the very beginning and he was love sick and distraught with not seeing her. Romeo had had a dream the night before about a bad thing happening at the Capulet's party. Being Romeo he believed his own thoughts and was nervous about going. We also found out that Juliet, only 13 years of age, was the only daughter of the Capulet's. She has her own 'nurse' to look after her as she is not very mature and relies on other people. Juliet is very distant from the rest of her family and does not get on with them the most majority of the time; she is a lonely child. Capulet wanted Juliet to marry Paris, a rich older man but only when Juliet was older. Capulet is a strong character, he tries to keep the peace between his family and the Montagues, but if the Montagues start a fight first then he will want to carry it on, as he doesn't want to be seen as the loser. Finally Tybalt, he is the nephew to Lady Capulet and despises the Montague's and tries his hardest to start fights with them and will never hear a bad word spoken about him. Immediately before this scene, the atmosphere is very gloomy as Romeo had a dream about a bad thing happening at Capulet's party, this also gets us interested, as we want to find out if he is right and what will happen. At the opening of scene 5 Capulet's servants prepare for his party. The atmosphere is very busy, rushed and fast moving. All of the servants are rushing around preparing for the party. They all talk to each other in short sentences; "You are look'd for, and call'd for, ask'd for"¦" This key line shows the short, snappy words the servants used. 'For' is repeatedly used as they are rushed and just use it as a joining word to get their sentence across before rushing off to prepare more things for the party once more. The apostrophes are repeated in all three words as it shows they are rushed even in their speech; they have to shorten words to say what they wanted quicker; they can't finish sentences and even words! They do not have the time to stand and chat especially under the watchful eye of Capulet; they have too much to do for everything to be ready for when the party begins. Capulet then welcomes guests into the party and tries to get them to dance. The atmosphere is very humorous, as people are all in fancy dress; it is very vibrant, lively and very cheerful as people are having fun. "Welcome Gentlemen, Ladies that have their toes unplagued with corns"¦" Capulet repeats the word 'Welcome', this tells us that he is very pleased that everyone has come and he may have had too much to drink and forgets that he has already said it! Capulet is eager to get the party off to a flying start and he teases all the ladies by telling they are welcome to attend his party if they have nice feet! Capulet adds a jolly atmosphere to the party. Once the party had got going, Romeo arrived and glimpses Juliet for the first time; the atmosphere was very romantic and slow. "What Lady's that which doth enrich the hand"¦" Romeo compares Juliet to jewels, ""¦As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear-"¦"which shows he thinks very highly of her, he uses "What Lady's that which doth enrich the hand"¦"in describing her as special. He immediately falls in love with her and we see a different side to Romeo, his mood and feelings go from one extreme to the other, as he was totally in love with Rosaline but with one sight of Juliet he is head over heals in love with her, which is very typical of Romeo. The effect on the audience is that we are privileged to share such an intimate moment between Romeo and Juliet. After Romeo and Juliet met, Tybalt overhears Romeo talking about Juliet and was angry that a Montague had come to the Capulet's own party. An argument started between him and Capulet, Tybalt wanted to fight Romeo outside and told one of the servants to go and get his sword but Capulet stopped him and didn't want any fight at his party and told him to leave it. The atmosphere was very tense and violent; Tybalt was very aggressive towards Capulet and anyone who helped try and stop him from fighting. ""¦Fetch me my rapier, boy"¦" This suggests he has no respect for his servants and people around him; he speaks as he is higher up than everyone else and uses the word 'boy' to show his power over them. Tybalt is impulsively violent; he acts first and thinks later, as he tries his hardest to start fights between him and the Montagues. It tells us he really wanted to fight Romeo. Capulet scolds Tybalt and he leaves the party sowing revenge. Tybalt was very angry that Romeo turned up, " He shall be endured"¦" Capulet is asserting his authority, as he wouldn't let him do anything about it. Capulet is being very naïve, as he thinks he has solved the problem. The atmosphere went from being very tense and un-settled to the audience finally having a breath of relief as the tense atmosphere is over. After Tybalt had left, Romeo and Juliet meet for the first time and end up kissing. The atmosphere is very romantic, as if it is slow motion because the camera focuses and continually flicks between Romeo and Juliet. "If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine,"¦" Romeo is very eager to impress, he is pleased that he had got to be with Juliet after wanting to all night. Juliet responds in the same way, she is very flattered and equally eager to impress. Whilst Romeo and Juliet were kissing Juliet's nurse interrupted them, the atmosphere is very rushed and happens very rapidly. Unfortunately, Romeo finds out that Juliet is a Capulet and is disappointed, as he knows he will never be able to be with her with people knowing because of their family differences, ""¦My life is my foe's debt." Romeo does not understand how Juliet could be a Capulet, he was very upset at first, and he was in the hands of his enemy. The audience get anxious because of Romeo finding out she is his foe and the atmosphere gets very apprehensive. The audience feel depressed that Romeo and Juliet cannot be together with their family despising each other even though they know there could be love between them. Finally after Romeo finds out Juliet is a Capulet; vice versa for Juliet; she finds out Romeo is a Montague. The atmosphere is very playful and menacing, as Romeo and Juliet are still hopeful for being with one another from the bad news, as they know they want to be together and do not care about the consequences of being together. They were both very shocked and heartbroken about being enemies but they are not as naïve as their family and can see through differences and see love comparisons. Juliet refers to graves, which is a sign of bad things about to happen; we could interoperate as death! "My grave is like to be my wedding bed." Juliet may be thinking ahead, if she married Romeo her family would disown her and she may as well be dead to them. She also may be thinking if she married Paris, she would be very unhappy. She doesn't want to marry him but she wants to make Capulet and her family happy. She knows she would have a bad life and would think of it as her deathbed! In Act 1 scene 5, he brings across the characteristics and their personalities and uses a lot of tension. Tybalt for example, when the atmosphere got tense because of Romeo being at the party, Tybalt lost his cool and started getting angry, which gives the audience his real personality. Shakespeare creates different moods and reveals different characters because of Act 1 scene 5 is such an important scene. We know about some of the characters personalities but he shows us more, getting the audience looking forward to the scene from the tense build-up from the scene before. He uses the two families to bring across the differences and personalities; this is how he creates different moods; mostly being tense. He reveals different aspects of the main characters.
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Shakespeare uses various techniques to create different moods and atmospheres and to reveal the characters. He uses comparisons in characters, the use of language and the use of tension. It is one of the most important scenes as it is where Romeo and Juliet first meet and where we learn the most about main characters. Being an important scene, Shakespeare has made it very tense and entertaining. The scene includes a lot of main key characters and we learn of the differences between the two families. The audience are already looking forward to this scene,...
the party, Tybalt lost his cool and started getting angry, which gives the audience his real personality.

Shakespeare creates different moods and reveals different characters because of Act 1 scene 5 is such an important scene. We know about some of the characters personalities but he shows us more, getting the audience looking forward to the scene from the tense build-up from the scene before.

He uses the two families to bring across the differences and personalities; this is how he creates different moods; mostly being tense.

He reveals different aspects of the main characters.

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Romeo & Juliet is believed... Romeo & Juliet is believed to have been written around 1595. The story is about a pair of star-crossed lovers. Two teenagers pursue their love for each other despite the fact that their families have been at odds with each other for decades. The story combines sword fighting, disguise, misunderstanding, tragedy, humor, and some of the most romantic language found in literature all in the name of true love. In Verona, Italy in the late 1500"s, two powerful families the Montague's and the Capulets have been feuding with each other for years. Old Capulet, Juliet"s father, throws a party to which he invites all his friends. The Montague's are not invited Romeo and his friends plan to get a look at Rosaline a young girl he has been pursing. Romeo and friends disguises themselves and slips into the party. Once inside he met Juliet it was love at first sight. Romeo falls instantly in love. Romeo is disappointed when he finds out that Juliet is a Capulet. Juliet notices Romeo too, but she is unaware that he is a member of the hated Montague's. Later, after discovering that the young man who caught her eye is a member of the enemy family, Juliet goes out onto her balcony to tell the stars about her strong but forbidden love. At the same time, Romeo is lurking in the bushes below. He overhears Juliet confess her love for him to the heavens. No longer able to control his powerful feelings, Romeo reveals himself to her and admits that he feels the same. The very next day, with the help of Romeo"s friend Friar Lawrence, Romeo and Juliet are secretly married. On the day of the wedding, two of Romeo"s friends, Benvolio and Mercutio, are walking through the streets of Verona when they are confronted by Juliet"s cousin, Tybalt. Tybalt is out to get Romeo for crashing the Capulet"s party so he starts a fight with his friends. Romeo shows up, but does not want to fight Tybalt because he no longer holds a grudge against Juliet"s family. Romeo"s friends can"t understand why he won"t stand up for himself so Mercutio steps in to do it for him. A swordfight with Tybalt follows. Mercutio is killed. To avenge the death of his friend, Romeo kills Tybalt, an act that will award him even more hatred from the Capulet family. The Prince of Verona banishes Romeo and he is forced to leave Juliet, who is devastated by the loss of her love. Juliet"s father, not knowing of his daughter"s marriage, decides to marry her to another young man named Paris. In despair, Juliet consults with Friar Laurence. He advises her to agree to the marriage, but on the morning of the wedding, she will drink a potion that h e prepares for her. The potion will make it look like Juliet is dead and she will be put into the Capulet burial vault. Then, the Friar will send Romeo to rescue her. She does as the Friar says and is put into the vault by her heartbroken parents. Bad news traveled fast. Before the Friar can tell Romeo of the hoax, Romeo hears from someone else that his beloved Juliet is dead. Overcome with grief, Romeo buys a poison and goes to Juliet"s tomb to die beside his wife. At the door of the tomb, Romeo is forced to fight Paris, whom he swiftly kills. Nothing will stop him from joining his love. Inside the vault, Romeo drinks the poison and takes his last breath next to his sleeping wife. Moments later, Juliet awakens to see her husband"s dead body. She learns what has happened from Friar Laurence who has just arrived and accessed the scene. With no reason left to live, Juliet kills herself with Romeo"s dagger. The tragedy has a tremendous impact on both the Montages and the Capulets. The families are hurt so much by the death of their children n that they agree to never fight again. Nurse: Having been the nanny since Juliet was an infant. Nurse is Juliet"s most trusted friend. She is the go between Juliet and her Romeo. She therefore rates as Romeo"s most important ally. Friar: The Friar is trusted by all. Together with Juliet, they conceive the plan for her and Romeo to be together. With Romeo, the friar is a constant source of advice and safe haven. For both, the friar is the man who marries them in secret. Prince: He upsets Juliet with his banishment of Romeo for killing Tybalt. But banishment to another city is much better than having Romeo killed as well. For Romeo, he spared his life with Exile, although exile from Juliet may have meant death. His banter suggests long friendship with Romeo and can become far out -- like way out. For example: Mercutio: No I am the very pink of courtesy. Romeo: Pink for flower? Mercutio: Right. Besides being a flower, he is also a center of attention. Romeo describes him as "a gentleman... that loves to hear himself talk." If one cares to be superstitious, the ending of Romeo & Juliet can seem affected by Mercutio"s curse on both the House of Montague and that of Capulet. As he dies, from Tybalt"s blow, he proclaims, "A plague on both your houses!" Romeo declares that his love for Juliet has made him effeminate, and that he should have fought Tybalt in Mercutio's place. When Tybalt, still angry, storms back onto the scene, Romeo draws his sword. They fight, and Romeo kills Tybalt. Benvolio urges Romeo to run; a group of citizens outraged at the recurring street fights is approaching. Romeo, shocked at what has happened, cries "O, I am fortune's fool!" The Prince enters, accompanied by many citizens, and the Montague's and Capulets. Benvolio tells the Prince the story of the brawl, emphasizing Romeo's attempt to keep the peace, but Lady Capulet, Tybalts aunt, cries that Benvolio is lying to protect the Montague's. She demands Romeo's life. Prince chooses instead to exile Romeo from Verona. He declares that should Romeo be found within the city, he will be killed. The sudden, fatal violence in the first scene of Act III, as well as the buildup to the fighting, serves as a reminder that, for all its emphasis on love, beauty, and romance, Romeo and Juliet still takes place in a masculine world in which notions of honor, pride, and status are prone to erupt in a fury of conflict. The viciousness and dangers of the play's social environment is a dramatic tool that Shakespeare employs to make the lovers' romance seem even more precious and fragile"”their relationship is the audience's only respite from the brutal world pressing against their love. The fights between Mercutio and Tybalt and then between Romeo and Tybalt are chaotic; Tybalt kills Mercutio under Romeo's arm, flees, and then suddenly, and inexplicably, returns to fight Romeo, who kills him in revenge. Passion outweighs reason at every turn. Romeo's cry, "O, I am fortune's fool!" refers specifically to his unluckiness in being forced to kill his new wife's cousin, thereby getting himself banished III.i.131. It also recalls the sense of fate that hangs over the play. Mercutio's response to his fate, however, is notable in the ways it diverges from Romeo's response. Romeo blames fate, or fortune, for what has happened to him. Mercutio curses the Montagues and Capulets. He seems to see people as the cause of his death, and gives no credit to any larger force. Elizabethan society generally believed that a man too much in love lost his manliness. Romeo clearly subscribes to that belief, as can be seen when he states that his love for Juliet had made him "effeminate." Once again, however, this statement can be seen as a battle between the private world of love and the public world of honor, duty, and friendship. The Romeo who duels with Tybalt is the Romeo who Mercutio would call the "true" Romeo. The Romeo who sought to avoid confrontation out of concern for his wife is the person Juliet would recognize as her loving Romeo. The word effeminate is applied by the public world of honor upon those things it does not respect. In using the term to describe his present state, Romeo accepts the responsibilities thrust upon him by the social institutions of honor and family duty. The arrival of the Prince and the angry citizens shifts the focus of the play to a different sort of public sphere. Romeo's killing of Tybalt is marked by rashness and vengeance, characteristics prized by noblemen, but which threaten the public order that citizens desire and the Prince has a responsibility to uphold. As one who has displayed such traits, Romeo is banished from Verona. Earlier, the Prince acted to repress the hatred of the Montagues and the Capulets in order to preserve public peace; now, still acting to avert outbreaks of violence, the Prince unwittingly acts to thwart the love of Romeo and Juliet. Consequently, with their love censured not only by the Montagues and Capulets but by the ruler of Verona, Romeo and Juliet's relationship puts Romeo in danger of violent reprisal from both from Juliet's kinsmen and the state.   

Romeo & Juliet is believed to have been written around 1595. The story is about a pair of star-crossed lovers. Two teenagers pursue their love for each other despite the fact that their families have been at odds with each other for decades. The story combines sword fighting, disguise,...

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In this play, there are three...In this play, there are three main girls in Billy Fishers life. Barbara, who is the old fashioned type who believes in a perfect future with two children and a lovely cottage in Devon, Rita, who is a loud mouthed girl with a "sluttish" appearance and Liz, who can never rest in one place but is very similar to Billy in her thinking. We are led to believe by the writer that Barbara is a very slow thinker. There are quite a few points in the play where we see this but I think the most obvious one is when Rita comes into the Fisher household and starts shouting about what she and Billy have been doing down at Foley Bottoms. Even though it is plainly obvious what she is talking about, Barbara still says to Billy " Billy, have you been having relations with this girl?". This is emphasized even more when the stage directions say; finding the right words at last. We are also shown that Barbara is afraid of physical contact, especially from Billy. She is very old fashioned with her morals about sex and marriage. She thinks it very indecent of Billy to be anywhere near her. This is shown when Billy says to Barbara; "I love you darling", and the stage directions taking her in his arms and Barbara's answer "I love you", and the stage directions moving away. This stage direction is very precise and helps to get a clearer picture of what is happening in the scene and also adds to the impression that we get of Barbara's character. We are encouraged to think that Barbara is very dreamy and is always thinking about the perfect future for herself and Billy. She talks about "little Billy and little Barbara" and even has in her mind what the curtains in her imaginary home are going to be made out of. She says to Billy, "Oh, I've seen the most marvellous material to make curtains for the living room. Honestly, you'll love it. It's a sort of turquoise with lovely little squiggles like wine glasses." Barbara respects the family unit and does her best to fit in and not cause to much disturbance within the Fisher household. She tries to help Mrs Fisher when Florence has 'one of her do's'. She says, even though the proposal is a little bit stupid considering what is happening, "Would she like an orange, Mrs Fisher?". She also insists on helping Mrs Fisher in washing up the pots. She has the most respect for the family out of the three girls but then again I think she feels the most comfortable in a family environment. She is portrayed as being very quiet. In the whole of act 2 she says little to Rita even though she is shouting lots of things at her fiancée and at her which are hurtful. There is one part where Rita says to Barbara " Oooh Billy will you kindly tell me? Aw, go take a long walk on a short pier, you squint eyed sow, you're nothing else." And Barbara just stands there and says nothing. Barbara is also shown to be a perfectionist by the writer. She has a perfect future planned for herself and Billy. She is very blinkered and cannot see that the world is different from what she thinks. She has it planned right down to the last detail. She even knows what material she will be using to make the curtains in the living room, and says to Billy; " Oh, I've seen the most marvellous material to make curtains for the living room. Honestly you'll love it. It's a sort of turquoise with lovely little squiggles like wine glasses" Barbara is the kind of person whose idea of a perfect future involves her with her husband and the children in a little cottage in Devon. She wants the children to be called little Billy and little Barbara. She even worries about what will happen in this future and this is emphasised when she says "Do you think a lily pond is safe? What if the kiddies wondered too near and fell in?" This phrase also shows that she must be a worrier in reality as well. She says too Billy later in the play; "Do you think your mother's going to like me, pet?" The writers of Billy Liar give a very accurate description of Barbara in the way that her clothes almost match her personality. They describe her wearing a tweed suit and flat heels. This style of clothing is very boring and un-interesting for a nineteen year old compared to the description of Rita. She is a very gullible person and even when Billy tells her he has been lying to her and he says he will never lie to her again she tells him that she believes him and says; "I believe you." The shortness of the sentence suggests that she did not hesitate in answering him and telling him that she believed him. This shows that she is very trusting of him even though he has told her he has lied to her. From her first appearance we can see what kind of person Rita is with her description. Her description is this; Rita approaches the house through the garden. She is a small girl with blonde hair "“ seventeen years old but she dresses to look much older. She is common and hard and works in a snack bar. This immediately puts a picture in our heads about Rita and what we expect her character to be like in the play. The words "common" and "hard" shows what kind of character she is going to turn out like. This immediately prepares us for her character and the impact she will have. It shows that she will play an important part in the play in terms of being aggressive and forceful. Compared to Barbara this description is entirely opposite and as you read through so is her character. Rita is a very aggressive person to anyone who gets in her way and threatens to take what she wants. She is not afraid of using aggressive language to get what she wants and can be very hurtful too. Her character often says some very upsetting things to Barbara when she and Billy are arguing even though she knows that it is not Barbara's fault and says to her at one point "Yes, you can go to her. She can have you. And she knows what she can do, the squint-eyed, bow-legged, spotty, snotty-nosed streak of nothing." We also find out that she has an incredible obsession with the ring that Billy has given to her. She likes being engaged to Billy and will stop at nothing to get the ring back that she thinks is rightfully hers. At one point she actually tries to fight Barbara to get the ring back off of her and says "I won't threaten you-I'll flatten you! Give me that cowing ring back!" and then makes a grab for Barbara's hand. She can be very sarcastic at times especially towards Barbara when they are fighting over the ring. When Barbara says to Billy, "Billy, have you been having relations with this girl?" and Rita's answer is, "What do you think he's been doing knitting a pullover?". Rita is disrespectful to Billy's family when she shouts, "You can bring his rotten father down. I hope you do. And his rotten Grandma". At this point Billy grandma is upstairs ill and dying. She says this when Mrs Fisher says she shall bring Billy's Father down to sort her out. When Billy tells her that the ring is at the jewellers she doesn't believe him. This is because she has had experiences before with Billy lying too her. When he tells her that his grandma was taken ill she says, "My names not silly you know. Either you get me that rotten ring back or I'm going to see your rotten mother." She thinks that the little dreams of Barbara are silly. She shows this when she says to Billy, "Don't come that tale with me. I said I didn't want to live in a rotten cottage in Devon-that's all." She is not a very secure person and I think that writers want you to think that she is marrying Billy for a touch of security in her life. Out of all the girls, I think that Liz is the one that Billy relates to the most. She has a similar mind to Billy and they are both dreamers. I think that we see this most clearly when she and Billy are talking about their own little country. Billy tells Liz about the little country he imagines and Liz says, "Do you do that? I knew you would. Why are we so alike, Billy? I can read your thoughts." This shows the similarity between them. Liz is written as a person who does not like to be tied down to one place for too long as she is always travelling around the country. Her character comes across as a very strong personality and a free spirit. She likes the uncommitted aspect of her life. This is emphasised when she says, "Its this town. It's the people we know. I don't like knowing everybody or becoming a part of things." She is shown by the writers to be very impulsive. When she is talking to Billy she takes the opportunity to persuade him to go to London as soon as it arises. She is also a very persuasive person with the way she makes Billy say he will go to London with her. This is shown when she says, "That's a bit vague. Soon. Why not now?" We are made to believe by the writers that Liz does not think about what the consequences will be if she goes to London with Billy. She does not care that Billy's Grandma has just died and what he might be feeling like. She is slightly insensitive. When she is persuading Billy to come with her to London she does not once ask him whether he is feeling fine with that and if he really does want to go. This is shown when she says "But we can, Billy! We can! What is there to stop us?" Throughout the play we are told that Liz is a very scruffy person but when we actually reach the part where she is in the play, the description of her is quite different from what we have been told. It says that she is "wearing the infamous skirt that we have heard so much about but it is not as dirty as we had been led to believe". This makes us think that the impression that we have got of Liz from others is somewhat different and this suggests that they maybe do not like her very much and so are twisting the truth to let us think that she is not a very nice person. When Billy talks about something Liz doesn't want to talk about she changes the subject. This is shown when her and Billy are talking about the letters she writes to Billy and rips up. She says, "How's Everything with you? How's the script-writing? How's the book coming along?" and the stage directions changing the subject. This shows that she does not like talking about things that she has done and is almost embarrassed by them. If I was asked which girl I would think Billy would be more likely go with I think I would have to say Barbara because she is the one that forgives him when he lies and is easier to please than Rita. Although Liz has got qualities, like having a lot in common with him, she cannot be depended on a great deal because she is always moving around, and Rita is very demanding of Billy and I don't think she would forgive him if he lied. Barbara offers Billy the most security out of all of them and this is why I think he will pick Barbara.   

In this play, there are three main girls in Billy Fishers life. Barbara, who is the old fashioned type who believes in a perfect future with two children and a lovely cottage in Devon, Rita, who is a loud mouthed girl with a "sluttish" appearance and Liz, who can never...

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