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Shakespeare uses various techniques to create different moods and atmospheres and to reveal the characters. He uses comparisons in characters, the use of language and the use of tension. It is one of the most important scenes as it is where Romeo and Juliet first meet and where we learn the most about main characters. Being an important scene, Shakespeare has made it very tense and entertaining. The scene includes a lot of main key characters and we learn of the differences between the two families. The audience are already looking forward to this scene, as we want to find out about and see Rosaline! We are expecting fun as it is a party and want to know what happens with Juliet and Paris; will she marry marry him when she is of an older and more mature age? Before this scene we found information about various main characters. The audience found out that Romeo was in love with Rosaline at the very beginning and he was love sick and distraught with not seeing her. Romeo had had a dream the night before about a bad thing happening at the Capulet's party. Being Romeo he believed his own thoughts and was nervous about going. We also found out that Juliet, only 13 years of age, was the only daughter of the Capulet's. She has her own 'nurse' to look after her as she is not very mature and relies on other people. Juliet is very distant from the rest of her family and does not get on with them the most majority of the time; she is a lonely child. Capulet wanted Juliet to marry Paris, a rich older man but only when Juliet was older. Capulet is a strong character, he tries to keep the peace between his family and the Montagues, but if the Montagues start a fight first then he will want to carry it on, as he doesn't want to be seen as the loser. Finally Tybalt, he is the nephew to Lady Capulet and despises the Montague's and tries his hardest to start fights with them and will never hear a bad word spoken about him. Immediately before this scene, the atmosphere is very gloomy as Romeo had a dream about a bad thing happening at Capulet's party, this also gets us interested, as we want to find out if he is right and what will happen. At the opening of scene 5 Capulet's servants prepare for his party. The atmosphere is very busy, rushed and fast moving. All of the servants are rushing around preparing for the party. They all talk to each other in short sentences; "You are look'd for, and call'd for, ask'd for"¦" This key line shows the short, snappy words the servants used. 'For' is repeatedly used as they are rushed and just use it as a joining word to get their sentence across before rushing off to prepare more things for the party once more. The apostrophes are repeated in all three words as it shows they are rushed even in their speech; they have to shorten words to say what they wanted quicker; they can't finish sentences and even words! They do not have the time to stand and chat especially under the watchful eye of Capulet; they have too much to do for everything to be ready for when the party begins. Capulet then welcomes guests into the party and tries to get them to dance. The atmosphere is very humorous, as people are all in fancy dress; it is very vibrant, lively and very cheerful as people are having fun. "Welcome Gentlemen, Ladies that have their toes unplagued with corns"¦" Capulet repeats the word 'Welcome', this tells us that he is very pleased that everyone has come and he may have had too much to drink and forgets that he has already said it! Capulet is eager to get the party off to a flying start and he teases all the ladies by telling they are welcome to attend his party if they have nice feet! Capulet adds a jolly atmosphere to the party. Once the party had got going, Romeo arrived and glimpses Juliet for the first time; the atmosphere was very romantic and slow. "What Lady's that which doth enrich the hand"¦" Romeo compares Juliet to jewels, ""¦As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear-"¦"which shows he thinks very highly of her, he uses "What Lady's that which doth enrich the hand"¦"in describing her as special. He immediately falls in love with her and we see a different side to Romeo, his mood and feelings go from one extreme to the other, as he was totally in love with Rosaline but with one sight of Juliet he is head over heals in love with her, which is very typical of Romeo. The effect on the audience is that we are privileged to share such an intimate moment between Romeo and Juliet. After Romeo and Juliet met, Tybalt overhears Romeo talking about Juliet and was angry that a Montague had come to the Capulet's own party. An argument started between him and Capulet, Tybalt wanted to fight Romeo outside and told one of the servants to go and get his sword but Capulet stopped him and didn't want any fight at his party and told him to leave it. The atmosphere was very tense and violent; Tybalt was very aggressive towards Capulet and anyone who helped try and stop him from fighting. ""¦Fetch me my rapier, boy"¦" This suggests he has no respect for his servants and people around him; he speaks as he is higher up than everyone else and uses the word 'boy' to show his power over them. Tybalt is impulsively violent; he acts first and thinks later, as he tries his hardest to start fights between him and the Montagues. It tells us he really wanted to fight Romeo. Capulet scolds Tybalt and he leaves the party sowing revenge. Tybalt was very angry that Romeo turned up, " He shall be endured"¦" Capulet is asserting his authority, as he wouldn't let him do anything about it. Capulet is being very naïve, as he thinks he has solved the problem. The atmosphere went from being very tense and un-settled to the audience finally having a breath of relief as the tense atmosphere is over. After Tybalt had left, Romeo and Juliet meet for the first time and end up kissing. The atmosphere is very romantic, as if it is slow motion because the camera focuses and continually flicks between Romeo and Juliet. "If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine,"¦" Romeo is very eager to impress, he is pleased that he had got to be with Juliet after wanting to all night. Juliet responds in the same way, she is very flattered and equally eager to impress. Whilst Romeo and Juliet were kissing Juliet's nurse interrupted them, the atmosphere is very rushed and happens very rapidly. Unfortunately, Romeo finds out that Juliet is a Capulet and is disappointed, as he knows he will never be able to be with her with people knowing because of their family differences, ""¦My life is my foe's debt." Romeo does not understand how Juliet could be a Capulet, he was very upset at first, and he was in the hands of his enemy. The audience get anxious because of Romeo finding out she is his foe and the atmosphere gets very apprehensive. The audience feel depressed that Romeo and Juliet cannot be together with their family despising each other even though they know there could be love between them. Finally after Romeo finds out Juliet is a Capulet; vice versa for Juliet; she finds out Romeo is a Montague. The atmosphere is very playful and menacing, as Romeo and Juliet are still hopeful for being with one another from the bad news, as they know they want to be together and do not care about the consequences of being together. They were both very shocked and heartbroken about being enemies but they are not as naïve as their family and can see through differences and see love comparisons. Juliet refers to graves, which is a sign of bad things about to happen; we could interoperate as death! "My grave is like to be my wedding bed." Juliet may be thinking ahead, if she married Romeo her family would disown her and she may as well be dead to them. She also may be thinking if she married Paris, she would be very unhappy. She doesn't want to marry him but she wants to make Capulet and her family happy. She knows she would have a bad life and would think of it as her deathbed! In Act 1 scene 5, he brings across the characteristics and their personalities and uses a lot of tension. Tybalt for example, when the atmosphere got tense because of Romeo being at the party, Tybalt lost his cool and started getting angry, which gives the audience his real personality. Shakespeare creates different moods and reveals different characters because of Act 1 scene 5 is such an important scene. We know about some of the characters personalities but he shows us more, getting the audience looking forward to the scene from the tense build-up from the scene before. He uses the two families to bring across the differences and personalities; this is how he creates different moods; mostly being tense. He reveals different aspects of the main characters.
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Shakespeare uses various techniques to create different moods and atmospheres and to reveal the characters. He uses comparisons in characters, the use of language and the use of tension. It is one of the most important scenes as it is where Romeo and Juliet first meet and where we learn the most about main characters. Being an important scene, Shakespeare has made it very tense and entertaining. The scene includes a lot of main key characters and we learn of the differences between the two families. The audience are already looking forward to this scene,...
the party, Tybalt lost his cool and started getting angry, which gives the audience his real personality.

Shakespeare creates different moods and reveals different characters because of Act 1 scene 5 is such an important scene. We know about some of the characters personalities but he shows us more, getting the audience looking forward to the scene from the tense build-up from the scene before.

He uses the two families to bring across the differences and personalities; this is how he creates different moods; mostly being tense.

He reveals different aspects of the main characters.

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In the Tragedy of Macbeth by...In the Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare, one of more interesting theories is the theory of kingship, which is developed in Macbeth through the presentation of three men. These men are Duncan, Malcolm and Macbeth. Each of these three characters demonstrates the three different and interesting types of kingship, which evidently adds to the play Macbeth. In short, Duncan is a good man but a useless king, Macbeth rules according to the Machiavellian concept and Malcolm's character emerges as a good man and a good king. Even before the second Forres scene act 1, scene 4, the point of Duncan's downfall, we see that Duncan is a good man but an unskilled king. Duncan is a kind man because he openly and kindly greets his nobles with praise. However, he is a poor leader and hence king because in the first Forres scene act 1, scene 2 Duncan did not fight along with his soldiers. Some might say that this is necessary because Duncan is an old man; others may see this as a reason why Duncan should not be in power. When a king doesn't fight along side of his troops, it decreases their confidence and opens opportunity for a rebellion. Another reason Duncan should not rule Scotland is that he is too trusting in his nobles. Duncan's "absolute trust" for the Thane of Cawdor nearly cost Duncan his life and country. As describe in the second Forres scene, Duncan makes this same mistake again in the Thane of Cawdor, who is this time Macbeth. During the second Forres scene, Duncan makes probably the most thoughtless speech he could have made. This speech in turn costs him his life. Three terrible mistakes appear in his speech and actions: he rewards unfairly; shows his emotions too freely; and again, he trusts too willingly. Duncan rewards Macbeth with the title and land of the Thane of Cawdor, as well he says that he will have greater rewards later in time, shown by the words "I have begun to plant thee, and will labor to make thee full of growing."1.4.28-29 While Macbeth gets many tangible gifts; Banquo simply receives a token of Duncan's approval, an embrace. A good ruler should never reward unfairly, for the receivers may become jealous or conceded, and may even wish to over through the king. Secondly, Duncan cries half way through his speech. A good king should always control his emotions. This is because crying shows there is a weak king in power. These first two mistakes as a king seem fairly trivial, but telling who will be the next king, in turn trusting his noblemen too much, is a risk a good king should never take. We see the terrible consequences from Duncan's fault in these words spoken by Macbeth: "The Prince of Cumberland! That is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'er-leap, For in my way it lies." 1.4.48-50 This simply means Macbeth realizes from Duncan's speech that he must kill to become king. From this quotation we can see another fault in Duncan's character; he doesn't learn from his mistakes. This conclusion comes from the fact that there are now two Thanes' of Cawdor that have betrayed him. In contrast to Duncan, Macbeth doesn't trust any one. He decides to use the concept of Machiavelli to help him keep the crown. Perhaps Macbeth's most cunning speech that demonstrates the concept of Machiavelli is the speech with Banquo just before Banqou's death. It is amazing because Macbeth finds out all the information he needs to kill Banquo: how far he's going; if he will be at the feast for sure; and if Banqou's son, Fleance, will be coming. Again using the Machiavellian concept, Macbeth plans to kill Fleance so no one will be left to seek revenge. Macbeth finds all this information in a friendly and unnoticeable fashion. The concept of Machiavelli, that Macbeth is using, seems to be a good way to rule, but there are three problems with his way of ruling: Macbeth has too many enemies to keep track of; he draws more attention to himself with every murder; and he can't live with his conscious. His conscious almost kills him and the other two problems kill him. Malcolm, Macduff and others escape Macbeth's grasp after becoming suspicious of him and kill him in the end. Macbeth's and Malcolm's different approaches to ruling are similar in the fact that they are very planed out, but as we will see, Malcolm has the better way of ruling"”a just and noble way. Malcolm possesses close to all the characteristics of a good ruler. One of the best characteristics he possesses, in direct difference to his father, is that he does not trust easily; the scene in England illustrates exactly this. When Macduff first comes to see Malcolm, Malcolm says; "Macduff, this noble passion, Child of integrity, hath from my soul Wiped the black scruples, reconciled my thoughts To thy good truth and honour. Devilish Macbeth By many of these trains hath sought to win me Into his power, and modest wisdom plucks me From over-credulous haste: but God above Deal between thee and me. for even now I put myself to thy direction, and Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjure The taints and blames I laid upon myself, For strangers to my nature. I"m yet Unknown to woman, never was forsworn, Scarcely have coveted what was mine own, At no time broke my faith, would not betray The devil to his fellow and delight No less in truth than life: my first false speaking Was this upon myself: what I"m truly, Is thine and my poor country"s to command: Whither indeed, before thy here-approach, Old Siward, with ten thousand warlike men, Already at a point, was setting forth. Now we"ll together; and the chance of goodness Be like our warranted quarrel. Why are you silent?" 4.3.115-137 Malcolm lists five clever reasons why Macduff could be a traitor stated in this passage: Macbeth was once thought to be a good man just as once was Macduff, and Macbeth betrayed him; Macduff used to be very good friends with Macbeth; Macbeth was not harmed Macduff in any way; Macduff may gain titles through the death of Malcolm; and finally, Malcolm's most genius theory is why would Macduff flee Scotland without his family if he thought Macbeth was after him? He later finds out that his family has been murdered when Ross tells him; "Your castle is surprised; your wife and babes Savagely slaughter"d: to relate the manner, Were, on the quarry of these murder"d deer, To add the death of you."4.3.204-207 Malcolm's final speech shows a final good characteristic"”he rewards fairly; "We shall not spend a large expense of time Before we reckon with your several loves, And make us even with you. My thanes and kinsmen, Henceforth be earls, the first that ever Scotland In such an honour named. What"s more to do, Which would be planted newly with the time, As calling home our exiled friends abroad That fled the snares of watchful tyranny; Producing forth the cruel ministers Of this dead butcher and his fiend-like queen, Who, as "tis thought, by self and violent hands Took off her life; this, and what needful else That calls upon us, by the grace of Grace, We will perform in measure, time and place: So, thanks to all at once and to each one, Whom we invite to see us crown"d at Scone."5.8.60-75 By making all his Thanes and kinsmen earls, they are all rewarded and they will all act as their own guard dogs. If one earl wants to gain power, the others will shut him down. Throughout Macbeth, Duncan has shown that he is a good man and Macbeth has shown some key points a king should have. In the sight of restored peace, Malcolm demonstrates the kindness and nobleness his father had and the.   

In the Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare, one of more interesting theories is the theory of kingship, which is developed in Macbeth through the presentation of three men. These men are Duncan, Malcolm and Macbeth. Each of these three characters demonstrates the three different and interesting types of kingship,...

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In 1945 J. B. Priestley wrote...In 1945 J. B. Priestley wrote the play "An Inspector Calls". It is a very tense play; the audience are always on the edge of their seats. It is didactic as it conveys a social and moral meaning to the play. The play has naturalistic conversation all the way through, to make it seem real, like you could be there. But it also has surreal elements; for example; the inspectors name is Inspector Goole. This sounds like a ghoul or a ghost. And at the end of the play, he disappears and his existence remains a mystery. In the play Priestley is making political and philosophical statements. He is offering us, the audience a message; the message that we should think about society; to not split the public into two groups the rich and the poor, to come together as a community. All the characters are responsible for Eva Smiths death, and through her death it shows that everyone is responsible for everyone else and that we should not think that if it doesn't involve us personally, than it is not our problem, because it is. Priestley wrote the play in 1945, but the play itself is set in 1912. I think he did this because they play is set two years before the outbreak of the First World War. Looking back on it, Priestly must have thought that 1912 seemed to be a secure time. Britain had a Navy, no wars were going on and Britain was wealthy. For people like the Birlings, life must have seemed great. But to people like Eva Smith, times were hard. There were no laws to help them get higher wages, and no help when they were out of work. To girls like Eva Smith it was a taste of hell. This creates a sense of unease and an ironic contrast as at the end of the play, it is the Birlings that are in hell, maybe not money wise, but in their conscience. Priestley is trying to make a social comment on the war, as families like the Birlings, war doesn't seem possible. They are so wrapped up in their own worlds; they don't seem to be able to acknowledge reality. The play is set deliberately in one scene, the dining room of a large comfortable, suburban house belonging to the Birlings. This is to create a sense of their claustrophobic world. This creates an interesting contrast because Birling thinks that war isn't possible but the audience knows that just a few years later the First World War broke out. I think the play is set in a large, wealthy house to show a contrast. It is to illustrate the contrast between the upper and lower classes, and how they differ. Here is a well-off family enjoying themselves, getting all life's luxuries. But also here is a girl who just wanted higher wages, and someone to love her. Instead this wealthy family look down on her. For example when the inspector tells the family that Eva Smith has committed suicide, Mrs Birling says; "I don't suppose for a moment that we can understand why the girl committed suicide. Girls of that class"¦" 'Girls of that class'. This is showing her snobbish, selfish side. This is the contrast I think Priestley is trying to make between the wealthy and the not so wealthy in 1912. They do not associate with each other socially, only when the lower class is working for the upper class. However not all the family are so small-minded. Once they have noticed that they have done something wrong, they do feel guilty. Shelia still feels angry with the others because they are not acting as if they are guilty, where in her eyes they are. I think she feels so angry because she is more guilt than anyone else. Shelia abused her privileged position and attempted to destroy someone's life based on petty jealousy. She didn't sack Eva Smith but she acted totally unreasonably and behaved very snobbishly. Shelia now realises that she is partly responsible for Eva's death, but in her view the others haven't admitted this to themselves and that is why she feels guilty and why she is angry with the rest of her family. While the others are relieved to find out there is no girl, Shelia reminds them that they still did terrible things to someone and that they were very lucky that nothing did happen to this girl; "But you're forgetting one thing I can't forget. Everything we said happened really happened. If it didn't end tragically then that's lucky for us. But it might have done." Gerald thinks about it logically and tries to come up with a reasonable explanation to what has just happened. He comes up with the idea that maybe there wasn't really a girl at all. He is trying to remove the blame from them. He is showing the symbolism of hope in the play, saying that there is still hope for them because there is no girl, so the things thy did weren't as bad as they were made out to be, as they didn't drive a girl to suicide. They are not responsible for a girl's death. But he is as much to blame as the others are. He may try to kid himself by thinking that he gave her food when she hadn't eaten for days, kept her over the summer months and allowed her to stay in rooms and gave her money even when the affair had ended. But the truth of the matter is that he used her for a couple of months; he didn't try to help her find employment to get on with her life. In order to take the blame away from himself, he says that there obviously was no girl so they didn't do anything wrong. But what he is not recognising is that they all sill did terrible things to another person. So, if there was a girl who was thinking about committing suicide, they would have all played a part in the girl's motives for killing herself. Mr Birling has a main part in this play. He represents the middle-class business owner of society. He lives a luxurious life while his employees have to survive on a pittance. His privileges come with responsibility but he does not seem to take notice of this. Employees such as Eva Smith should have rights. He took away a girl's job without considering the consequences of a dismissal without a reference. How was Eva Smith supposed to find a new well-paid job without a reference form her last job? But Mr Birling didn't give one thought to what she did as long as she was off his hands. I think that Mr Birling clashes with the Inspector because he fails to see he has done anything wrong. The Inspector thinks he has, and is trying to show Birling this. But Birling refuses to believe it. "I don't see we need to tell the Inspector anything more. In fact there's nothing I can tell. I told the girl to clear out, and she went. That's the last I heard of her." He was explaining how he washed his hands of this girl and he sees no reason why this has anything has anything to do with why Eva Smith killed herself. Birling still doesn't realise that this was the start of it. He played a part in the long string of events that led to her suicide. Later on in the play, I think he almost recognises that the whole family has done something wrong. But as soon as he starts to think this, Birling gets the news that the Inspector is not real, so he feels excited, relieved that the blame is taken away from him. However he is not entirely satisfied so he gets Gerald to ring the Infirmary and he then finds out that there is no dead girl. He is then very triumphant and relieved as is the rest of the family, and he is trying to put it all behind him and thinks everyone else should do the same. He is just telling Eric and Shelia to do this when the phone rings. "That was the police. A girl has just died on her way to the infirmary "“ after swallowing some disinfectant. And a police Inspector is on his way here to ask some questions." And as the play ends on this note, the audience is left very tense and on the edge of their seats. This is because the Birlings think the nightmare has ended, when really the inspector was just preparing them for what lies ahead. The audience is also left confused as to whom the inspector was. The play has a very tense double ending. The play could have ended when the inspector left but that would leave the characters to wriggle out of the truth and once more continue their lives in a selfish and hypocritical manner. So J. B. Priestley makes his point more forcibly. I would say that J. B. Priestly makes a very clear statement. Priestley chooses to make his criticism of his society through a well-off middle class Edwardian family. This shows their wealth and outlook on life. For them it is a life where you dress up for dinner, have maids, where ladies leave the men alone to the port and the serious conversation; whereas the women have the general chit-chat about the weather etc. This is obviously not what it was like for Eva Smith/ Daisy Renton. She is a careful worker with a much stronger sense of morals than the Birlings; yet she is condemned to unemployment, and poverty. None of the middle class society helps her and she is eventually driven to suicide. Certainly the play contains a deeply social message; emphasised by an atmosphere of mystery and symbolism. Gradually the emphasis shifts away from the realistic details and the play begins to deal with different issues. The language becomes less realistic and the moral message is more insistent. The inspector gradually becomes the mysterious voice of conscience. He tells the Birling family that men should learn of their responsibility towards of each other. The play shows that the responsibility that a middle class family take is a sham; and that people should take more responsibility. The message for the audience is that they should not only question the Birlings' generation, but also their own. The political message is a very general one. In this play, individual people are criticised. This is to demonstrate that the play declares that we have a responsibility towards one another. People must become more supportive of each other. They must also develop a different concept of social duty. The final message of the play is a plea for change, first a change in human nature, then a change in society.   

In 1945 J. B. Priestley wrote the play "An Inspector Calls". It is a very tense play; the audience are always on the edge of their seats. It is didactic as it conveys a social and moral meaning to the play. The play has naturalistic conversation all the way through,...

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