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There are five characters who can be linked to the death of Eva Smith. All of the members of the Birling family and Sheila Birling's fiancé Gerald Croft. All of these five characters will be looked at separately before an opinion is drawn. Mr. Birling is connected to Eva Smith in the fact that he employed her as a worker in his factory. After Eva led a strike over pay, Mr. Birling fired her and Eva found herself on the streets. Mr. Birling's son Eric found the fact that her father Arthur had fired a woman over such a small dispute over pay as 2 and a half pence. This can be shown when he says, 'Why shouldn't they try for higher wages? And I don't see why she should have been sacked just because she'd a bit more spirit than the others.' Mr. Birling stands by himself, believing that he had done the correct thing when he says, 'I can't accept any responsibility.' Sheila Birling, Arthur Birling's daughter, was the second member of the family to be connected to Eva Smith. Eva Smith was working in a shop called Milwards when Sheila paid a visit there to but a dress. Sheila became displeased with Eva's attitude when she caught a glimpse of her smirking at her in the mirror when she was trying a dress on. Sheila complained, and as a regular customer, she got the girl sacked. Sheila took the fact that she had done this to heart and felt exceptionally bitter that she could have done such a thing that may have ended a girl's life. This can be shown when she said 'Don't you understand? And if I could help her now, I would-'. Sheila is very shocked when it is revealed to her that Eva Smith took her own life, and Sheila instantly believes that it is all her fault that Eva is now dead, especially because Sheila got Eva fired because she was jealous of her good looks. Eric Birling, Arthur Birling's daughter, was also connected to the death of Eva Smith in and was directly in contact with her, which comes as a great shock to his family when it is revealed on page 49. Eric played a major part in Eva Smith's life for a few months when they were having an affair. During this period, Eva became pregnant with Eric's baby. When Eric is told about the death of Eva, it is obvious that he believes that he played no part in her death and that it was all his own mothers fault. This can be shown when he says 'you killed her. She came to you to protect me "“ and you turned her away "“ yes, and you killed her "“ and the child she'd had too "“ my child "“ your own grandchild "“ you killed them both "“ damn you, damn you -'. This passage shows that Eric might have actually felt something for Eva, in contradiction to what he told the inspector when he said 'I wasn't in love with her or anything'. Eric obviously tried very hard to make life as comfortable as possible for Eva Smith as well, so he may not be one of the major contributors to Eva's death, Eric believes that his mother Mrs. Birling is the one who killed Eva. Mrs. Birling, the wife of Arthur Birling, is seen by Eric to be the one to have killed Eva Smith. This is because she turned Eva away from the organisation that she chaired because she felt that the story that Eva Smith was telling was false and that Mrs. Birling also didn't like the fact that Eva had used the name Mrs. Birling when she came in front of the committee. The real Mrs. Birling didn't like this, so she used her power to reject Eva's case. Mrs. Birling, however, doesn't think that she has herself to blame for the death of Eva Smith. This can be shown when she says 'I think she had only herself to blame.' Mrs. Birling also felt that she would have done anything wrong even if Eva Smith hadn't used Mrs. Birling as her name. This can be shown where Mrs. Birling says 'I did nothing that I'm ashamed of that won't bear investigation"¦I consider I did my duty.' These few examples could argue that Mrs. Birling is quite arrogant and believes that she is always right and that anything she does will never need justifying. The last character to investigate is the fiancé of Sheila, Gerald Croft. Gerald is another character who had had very close ties to Eva Smith, or as her name was at this point ion history, Daisy Renton. At the start of his relationship with Sheila, Gerald had an affair with Daisy. It doesn't appear that ht ending of this relationship with Daisy, however, had much to do with the death of Daisy or Eva. This can be shown when Gerald says 'She told me she'd been happier than she'd ever been before'. This shows that the affair that Daisy had with Gerald didn't really do much for the breaking down of Eva into her taking her own life. This shows that Gerald didn't really have much to do with the death of Eva Smith, but more with the keeping of Eva Smith happy. All of the five characters were all connected with Eva Smith or Daisy Renton, but only three of them, Sheila, Arthur and Mrs. Birling, made Eva or Daisy unhappy as a consequence of their actions. Arthur fired Eva and put her out onto the streets, but she was happy again when she found another job at Milwards. This means that Arthur shouldn't carry a lot of the blame for the death of Eva. Sheila complained about Eva and succeeded in getting her fired from her new job. This put Eva out onto the streets. This must have brought her close to unhappiness, but Gerald than had an affair with her, which picked her off the floor and made her happy again. Eric then slept with Eva and got her pregnant, but he supported her with money to make sure that she would be all right. Mrs. Birling then turned Eva Smith away from the help that she desperately required for the caring of the baby that she was going to have. This seemed like the last straw for Eva, and when she was rejected, she felt it was one too many and took her own life. This means that the majority of the blame must lie with Mrs. Birling, although a small part would lie with Arthur for setting the ball rolling, and with Sheila for helping her along the way.
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There are five characters who can be linked to the death of Eva Smith. All of the members of the Birling family and Sheila Birling's fiancé Gerald Croft. All of these five characters will be looked at separately before an opinion is drawn. Mr. Birling is connected to Eva Smith in the fact that he employed her as a worker in his factory. After Eva led a strike over pay, Mr. Birling fired her and Eva found herself on the streets. Mr. Birling's son Eric found the fact that her father Arthur had fired a woman over such a...
her with money to make sure that she would be all right. Mrs. Birling then turned Eva Smith away from the help that she desperately required for the caring of the baby that she was going to have. This seemed like the last straw for Eva, and when she was rejected, she felt it was one too many and took her own life. This means that the majority of the blame must lie with Mrs. Birling, although a small part would lie with Arthur for setting the ball rolling, and with Sheila for helping her along the way.

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We are analysing a number of...We are analysing a number of different sonnets. We will be analysing sonnet 18, 130, 55 by William Shakespeare and 'Strugnells sonnet' by Wendy Cope. Imagery is the 'picture' that is created in a readers mind when reading a piece of writing. In both of the sonnets 18/130 the imagery deployed is Nature. The writer uses nature imagery to define his subject to the reader. For example in 18, the imagery is very positive towards the lover. He uses words such as 'Thou art more lovely and more temperate'. He aims to flatter the lover through creating a very positive impression. But in 130 it is the total opposite. Negative comments are made towards the mistress from the very first line e.g. 'My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun'. This is parallelism because in both of the opening lines of 18 and 130 the imagery of sun is deployed. In 18 it is deployed to flatter the lover. But in 130 it is used to show the real person the mistress is. In the opening of 130 it says 'My Mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun'. The imagery in 18 is based around a summer's day which is used in the opening line, unlike in 130 which is disparate. The thematic connections in 130 are much looser, but the majority is connected as natural objects. But something unusual is used in 130. 'wires' is used towards the end of the first quatrain. This is a man-made object and is unusually used in a sonnet deploying imagery of nature. The word 'wires' is now an archaic term that has changed meaning since the 1600's. It used to mean a strand of gold to form a necklace. Some of the imagery used in 130 was thought to be unfashionable in the 1600's. For example in the sonnet his mistress has dark skin instead of pale which was fashionable in the 1600's. It is as if the mistress' looks are unfashionable "“ e.g. 'But no such roses see I in her cheeks'. Nowadays most people prefer tanned skin over pale skin. 130 is very negative throughout the sonnet. He implies that his mistress has very dull eyes and also uses the possessive word 'my' when talking about his mistress implying that he owns her. In the opening line of 18 a rhetorical question is used 'Shall I compare thee to a summers day?' and in the opening line of 130, a simile is used 'My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun'. These are two different rhetorical devices used in the Sonnets. 18 and 130 are two very different poems. 18 uses positive lexis to 'compare thee to a summer's day'. In the second line Shakespeare writes 'more lovely' and 'more temperate'. This is further use of parallelism. Then in the first line of the second quatrain an extremity 'too' is used. The use of all these words, shows how positive this poem is, Unlike 130 which uses negative terms to describe the mistress. In the last two lines of the opening quatrain parallelism is used. A unique sentence structure, in only two lines throughout the sonnet, is used. The lines both start with 'If' conditionals and the things it says are still negative linking in with the rest of the sonnet. Towards the end of 130, there is a change in the sonnet. The writer says 'I love to hear her speak'. This line may change the whole meaning of the sonnet. If the mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun it doesn't mean that they are black does it? In most sonnets, the features iambic pentameter and alternate end-rhyme are used. The end rhyme pattern is also used in both of the sonnets. A B A B C D C D E G E G F F In both 18/130 alternate end-rhyme is used. But in 130 the end-rhyme is used to show the negative features of the Mistress. For example 'My Mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun"¦' 'If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun'. It comes as a surprise to the reader because they usually stereotype sonnets as being love poems. So this would come as a shock because it goes against the expectations of sonnets. Both the poems use iambic pentameter, but something unusual is used in one line of 130. In line 13 of 130 11 syllables are used. The reader may not notice this, but it is used for a reason. It is used to emphasise an idea that the 'voice' has that the Mistress may not be like all the other women but she is 'rare'. She is not ugly but is unique and special. Towards the end of 18 monosyllables are used to emphasize the importance of the couplet. The couplet means that as long as people read 18 it will 'live' forever. 'So long lives this and this gives life to thee'. The conclusion I give is that 18 uses the Sonnet tradition to show the pure qualities of his lover through hyperbole. But when this concept is used in 130 the mistress seems unattractive. The sonnet tradition as a whole can be summed up in two points. 1. The main theme is love, but they all have different ways of expressing this love. 2. The sonnet will be immortalised All of the sonnets we are analysing show signs of the first point, but in 18 and 55 they are expressed more clearly. Also in sonnets 18 and 55 the second point is emphasised throughout. But in 130 and Strugnells, it is suggested that a traditional sonnet is an ineffective love poem. In sonnet 130, when Shakespeare writes using the sonnet tradition, the Mistress seems hideous. 'My Mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;' Sonnets 18 and 55 are said to be the archetypal sonnets. This is because they both express the one of the two points very clearly. another concept is used to say that the poem will last so long it will immortalize the lover. Sonnet 55 shows the second point throughout the poem with very strong imagery. 'Not marble nor the gilded monuments / Of princes shall outlive this powr'ful rhyme,' 'That wear this world out to the ending doom/So, till the judgment that yourself arise'. Stone was said to be everlasting. The voice is saying that the Sonnet will last longer than stone and will even last till judgement day- the end of the world. Strugnells sonnet is a parody of sonnet 55. This can be proven by direct echoes of sonnet 55 in the first 3 words of Strugnells sonnet. SS'Not only marble'/55'Not marble nor'. Strugnells sonnet is saying that sonnets don't last forever. In fact they don't even last longer than 'the plastic toys/From cornflake packets,' 'I cannot immortalise you"¦' Although this is the point of view of the imaginary writer Wendy Cope has invented Strugnell it seems ironic because he has wrote a sonnet based on a 400 year old sonnet. In a way it is true because modern day we don't accept hyperbole. If a man was trying to impress a woman he wouldn't go up to her and recite sonnet 18 because she would probably laugh in his face. Nowadays love is feelings are expressed differently than the era of courtly love in which Shakespeare's sonnets were wrote.   

We are analysing a number of different sonnets. We will be analysing sonnet 18, 130, 55 by William Shakespeare and 'Strugnells sonnet' by Wendy Cope. Imagery is the 'picture' that is created in a readers mind when reading a piece of writing. In both of the sonnets 18/130 the imagery...

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