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There are five characters who can be linked to the death of Eva Smith. All of the members of the Birling family and Sheila Birling's fiancé Gerald Croft. All of these five characters will be looked at separately before an opinion is drawn. Mr. Birling is connected to Eva Smith in the fact that he employed her as a worker in his factory. After Eva led a strike over pay, Mr. Birling fired her and Eva found herself on the streets. Mr. Birling's son Eric found the fact that her father Arthur had fired a woman over such a small dispute over pay as 2 and a half pence. This can be shown when he says, 'Why shouldn't they try for higher wages? And I don't see why she should have been sacked just because she'd a bit more spirit than the others.' Mr. Birling stands by himself, believing that he had done the correct thing when he says, 'I can't accept any responsibility.' Sheila Birling, Arthur Birling's daughter, was the second member of the family to be connected to Eva Smith. Eva Smith was working in a shop called Milwards when Sheila paid a visit there to but a dress. Sheila became displeased with Eva's attitude when she caught a glimpse of her smirking at her in the mirror when she was trying a dress on. Sheila complained, and as a regular customer, she got the girl sacked. Sheila took the fact that she had done this to heart and felt exceptionally bitter that she could have done such a thing that may have ended a girl's life. This can be shown when she said 'Don't you understand? And if I could help her now, I would-'. Sheila is very shocked when it is revealed to her that Eva Smith took her own life, and Sheila instantly believes that it is all her fault that Eva is now dead, especially because Sheila got Eva fired because she was jealous of her good looks. Eric Birling, Arthur Birling's daughter, was also connected to the death of Eva Smith in and was directly in contact with her, which comes as a great shock to his family when it is revealed on page 49. Eric played a major part in Eva Smith's life for a few months when they were having an affair. During this period, Eva became pregnant with Eric's baby. When Eric is told about the death of Eva, it is obvious that he believes that he played no part in her death and that it was all his own mothers fault. This can be shown when he says 'you killed her. She came to you to protect me "“ and you turned her away "“ yes, and you killed her "“ and the child she'd had too "“ my child "“ your own grandchild "“ you killed them both "“ damn you, damn you -'. This passage shows that Eric might have actually felt something for Eva, in contradiction to what he told the inspector when he said 'I wasn't in love with her or anything'. Eric obviously tried very hard to make life as comfortable as possible for Eva Smith as well, so he may not be one of the major contributors to Eva's death, Eric believes that his mother Mrs. Birling is the one who killed Eva. Mrs. Birling, the wife of Arthur Birling, is seen by Eric to be the one to have killed Eva Smith. This is because she turned Eva away from the organisation that she chaired because she felt that the story that Eva Smith was telling was false and that Mrs. Birling also didn't like the fact that Eva had used the name Mrs. Birling when she came in front of the committee. The real Mrs. Birling didn't like this, so she used her power to reject Eva's case. Mrs. Birling, however, doesn't think that she has herself to blame for the death of Eva Smith. This can be shown when she says 'I think she had only herself to blame.' Mrs. Birling also felt that she would have done anything wrong even if Eva Smith hadn't used Mrs. Birling as her name. This can be shown where Mrs. Birling says 'I did nothing that I'm ashamed of that won't bear investigation"¦I consider I did my duty.' These few examples could argue that Mrs. Birling is quite arrogant and believes that she is always right and that anything she does will never need justifying. The last character to investigate is the fiancé of Sheila, Gerald Croft. Gerald is another character who had had very close ties to Eva Smith, or as her name was at this point ion history, Daisy Renton. At the start of his relationship with Sheila, Gerald had an affair with Daisy. It doesn't appear that ht ending of this relationship with Daisy, however, had much to do with the death of Daisy or Eva. This can be shown when Gerald says 'She told me she'd been happier than she'd ever been before'. This shows that the affair that Daisy had with Gerald didn't really do much for the breaking down of Eva into her taking her own life. This shows that Gerald didn't really have much to do with the death of Eva Smith, but more with the keeping of Eva Smith happy. All of the five characters were all connected with Eva Smith or Daisy Renton, but only three of them, Sheila, Arthur and Mrs. Birling, made Eva or Daisy unhappy as a consequence of their actions. Arthur fired Eva and put her out onto the streets, but she was happy again when she found another job at Milwards. This means that Arthur shouldn't carry a lot of the blame for the death of Eva. Sheila complained about Eva and succeeded in getting her fired from her new job. This put Eva out onto the streets. This must have brought her close to unhappiness, but Gerald than had an affair with her, which picked her off the floor and made her happy again. Eric then slept with Eva and got her pregnant, but he supported her with money to make sure that she would be all right. Mrs. Birling then turned Eva Smith away from the help that she desperately required for the caring of the baby that she was going to have. This seemed like the last straw for Eva, and when she was rejected, she felt it was one too many and took her own life. This means that the majority of the blame must lie with Mrs. Birling, although a small part would lie with Arthur for setting the ball rolling, and with Sheila for helping her along the way.
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There are five characters who can be linked to the death of Eva Smith. All of the members of the Birling family and Sheila Birling's fiancé Gerald Croft. All of these five characters will be looked at separately before an opinion is drawn. Mr. Birling is connected to Eva Smith in the fact that he employed her as a worker in his factory. After Eva led a strike over pay, Mr. Birling fired her and Eva found herself on the streets. Mr. Birling's son Eric found the fact that her father Arthur had fired a woman over such a...
her with money to make sure that she would be all right. Mrs. Birling then turned Eva Smith away from the help that she desperately required for the caring of the baby that she was going to have. This seemed like the last straw for Eva, and when she was rejected, she felt it was one too many and took her own life. This means that the majority of the blame must lie with Mrs. Birling, although a small part would lie with Arthur for setting the ball rolling, and with Sheila for helping her along the way.

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The play Hamlet was written by...The play Hamlet was written by Shakespeare. It is considered the most problematic play because it can be interpreted in many ways and it is something which has universal appeal. For example it appeals to teenagers as it describes the agonies of love between Hamlet and Ophelia. It also portrays him as a rebellious character. The most important scene in the play is considered to be act 1 scene 2. It is considered the most significant because of the following reasons"¦ The first reason is that this scene explains to us the situation in the country and the recent events. This is communicated by Shakespeare through Claudius. He briefly explains that Denmark has just been to war with Norway where they captured new territory. However, the Norwegians want their land back and so the audience feels the tension building up. The new king also thanks the people for keeping up with the events. After all, they have just witnessed a funeral for one king followed by a hasty marriage of their Queen, followed very closely by the crowning of the new king Claudius himself. From Claudius' speech the audience develops a dislike to his character because he seems very fake. For example he says, "Though yet of Hamlet, our dear brother's death the memory be green" after which he quickly changes the subject to his marriage to the queen. He is a typical politician trying to please everyone. After looking important and bossing around Laertes, he turns to Hamlet, the prince. "But now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son" he calls Hamlet a cousin and he calls him a son but both are actually a lie. Hamlet wittily replies "A little more than kin, and more than kind." This is clever wordplay because Hamlet is mocking with Claudius but doesn't make it look like he is. Hamlet says he is "more than" a kin. He is more "kin" to his uncle. He also says it to emphasize that he isn't like his uncle even though he is his stepson. The next thing Hamlet says can be interpreted in two different ways. When he says "Not the dejected 'havior of the visage, Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief. That can denote me truly, these indeed seem, For they are actions that a man might play," he goes on to explain how it is not how he looks but how he feels inside. However the interesting thing is that visage can be used to describe a face as well as a mask so is he trying to say that these are his true emotions or is he hiding behind a mask? This scene reveals the relationship between Hamlet and Claudius. Claudius tells Hamlet to not return to his school because Claudius wants to keep him close to him so as to keep an eye on him. Even the Queen wants him to stay with them. Hamlet answers "I shall in all my best obey you mother" which shows the audience that he does not have a lot of respect for Claudius. As all of communication of feeling is done solely through monologues, the audience finds out Hamlet's true feelings through his soliloquy. We find out that Hamlet is disgusted by his mother's marriage to Claudius after his father's death. He compares Claudius to his father and thinks one is a "hyperion" a sun god while the other is a "satyr". Satyrs are creatures in mythology who were half man half goat and ran around raping women. Hamlet expresses his bitterness to his mother he doesn't like the way she "hangs on him". He is very upset that she married so soon after the funeral "Frailty, thy name is woman". He thinks that Queen Gertrude is committing incest as she married her husband's brother, so she was related to him. However, the audience get the impression that he doesn't want to make anyone upset as he says "For I must hold my tongue". Hamlet's bitterness is also shown in his dialogue with Horatio, when he says that Horatio didn't come to see his father's funeral but came to attend the wedding. He shows his hatred of Claudius when he comments on the fact that Claudius was so cheap that he had to use the same food for both occasions. This scene is also very important because it is the first time Hamlet finds out about the ghost of his father. He questions his appearance and after finding out about that agrees to come with them to see the ghost tonight. The audience realizes that Hamlet is suspicious about his father's death and is very upset. He "doubts some foul play" and believes that "all is not well". The audience overwhelmingly agrees.   

The play Hamlet was written by Shakespeare. It is considered the most problematic play because it can be interpreted in many ways and it is something which has universal appeal. For example it appeals to teenagers as it describes the agonies of love between Hamlet and Ophelia. It also portrays...

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Discuss Shakespeare's presentation of the relationships...Discuss Shakespeare's presentation of the relationships between the characters in act 3 scene 5 'Romeo and Juliet' was written by William Shakespeare in 1593, the play is set mainly in Verona, a city in northern Italy. Romeo and Juliet are the children of the two most important families, the Montagues and the Capulets, who are engaged in an ancient feud. Act three scene five gives the audience a striking dramatic contrast and is a very significant part of the play, it is also a turning point for Romeo and Juliet. This scene opens with Juliet saying goodbye to Romeo, who must leave for Mantua. They have just spent their wedding night together in her room. We can tell that there is a relationship from the language that Shakespeare uses, for instants when Juliet keeps on insisting that Romeo should stay and when she calls Romeo 'love' means that they want to stay together. The When it is day Romeo has to leave Juliet, when Romeo says, 'more light and light, more dark and dark our woes' this suggests that as it gets lighter, the more their sadness grows. Romeo says he would be prepared to die for love and this is very ironic and ominous to the audience. Juliet says she has 'an ill-divining soul' and imagines the she sees Romeo dead in the bottom of a tomb. Shakespeare's uses the talk of meteors and Juliet imagining Romeo dead in the bottom of a tomb to warn the audience of the upcoming tragedy, both of these events are evil omens and develop the theme of death and misfortune. The most important feature of Juliet"s speech in this scene is ambiguity or double meanings. When Lady Capulet says that Romeo by killing Tybalt has caused Juliet"s grief, she agrees that Romeo has made her sad, and that she would like to get her hands on him. By placing one word "“ 'dead' - between two sentences, Juliet makes her mother think she wants Romeo dead, while really saying that her heart is dead because of him. When she swears 'by Saint Peter"s Church and Peter too', her mother thinks she is just using a strong oath - but the audience knows that Saint Peter decides who goes to heaven or hell: so she is swearing by the saint who would disallow a bigamous marriage. Later, Juliet speaks sarcastically to the Nurse, who thinks she is sincere, when she says that the Nurse has comforted her 'marvellous much', with her suggestion of 'marrying' Paris. Juliet"s last speech in this scene, as she is alone on stage, is, of course, a soliloquy - it shows what she is thinking. Both parents use interesting comparisons for Juliet"s tears. Lady Capulet suggests that Juliet is trying to wash Tybalt from his grave, because she is crying so much - she tells her daughter that she is crying too much, and makes a play on the words much and some "“ 'Some grief shows much of love', but 'much grief shows some want [absence] of wit' [common sense or sense of proportion]. Lady Capulet means that Juliet is overdoing her show of grief. This kind of contrast, where similar words are rearranged in two halves of a sentence to show opposite meanings, is called antithesis. Capulet also notices Juliet"s tears but uses an extended metaphor. He compares the light rain [drizzle] of a real sunset with the heavy downpour of Juliet"s tears for the metaphorical sunset [death] of his brother"s son [Tybalt]. He develops this into the idea of a ship in a storm at sea - Juliet"s eyes are the sea, her body is the bark [ship] and her sighs are the winds. Juliet is obedient up until the point where she disagrees to marrying with Paris, after this she is duplicitous and not being obedient any more, there is no trust with her mother, she is being sly, when she says 'I would the fool were married to her grave' there is use of dramatic irony. When Juliet says she doesn't want to marry Paris, Lady Capulet is very dismissive and doesn't want to comment. Another feature of the language is Capulet"s range of insults. He claims that Juliet is proud: she insists that she is not, and Capulet repeats the word as evidence of her 'chopt-logic' or splitting hairs. These insults may seem mild or funny today, but were far more forceful in the 16th Century: 'green-sickness carrion', 'tallow-face', 'baggage...wretch' and 'hilding'. Capulet contrasts Paris"s merits as a husband with Juliet"s immature objections. He says that Paris is 'Of fair demesnes, youthful and nobly ligned' and 'stuffed...with honourable parts'. He calls his daughter a 'wretched puling fool' and a 'whining mammet', before sarcastically mimicking her objections to the match: 'I cannot love...I am too young'. The audience knows of course that she can and does love it is Rosaline who cannot, and that she is obviously not 'too young' to marry. See if you can find out what these insults mean. Try to remember them, and act out the scene, making them as forceful as you can. Also, when Capulet becomes angry, he uses language inventively - so the adjective [describing word] proud becomes both verb and noun: 'proud me no prouds'. And finally, he reminds us of his power over Juliet by speaking of her as if she were a thoroughbred horse, which he can sell at will "“ 'fettle your fine joints', he says, meaning that she must prepare herself for marriage. Juliet calls her mother 'madam' which tells us she has formed a very formal relationship with her; she treats her mother as a superior, and is polite and well mannered towards her. But her relationship with the nurse is very different she treats the nurse as her natural mother, as she would have been the one to raise Juliet, the nurse courageously defends Juliet when Capulet gets outraged, lady Capulet does try to defend Juliet but not as much as the nurse. The relationship between her and her father is also very formal, Capulet treats Juliet as a possession or object and only does what he thinks is best for her. Romeo's and Juliet's relationship have equality in their relationship, unlike Juliet's parents where Capulet is the dominant one and has a higher status than Lady Capulet. This is a key scene because at the end of it all Juliet's relationships are destroyed and she has no choice but to go to Friar Lawrence, and after this point you can tell the relationship is doomed and will be a tragedy.  

Discuss Shakespeare's presentation of the relationships between the characters in act 3 scene 5 'Romeo and Juliet' was written by William Shakespeare in 1593, the play is set mainly in Verona, a city in northern Italy. Romeo and Juliet are the children of the two most important families, the Montagues...

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