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There are five characters who can be linked to the death of Eva Smith. All of the members of the Birling family and Sheila Birling's fiancé Gerald Croft. All of these five characters will be looked at separately before an opinion is drawn. Mr. Birling is connected to Eva Smith in the fact that he employed her as a worker in his factory. After Eva led a strike over pay, Mr. Birling fired her and Eva found herself on the streets. Mr. Birling's son Eric found the fact that her father Arthur had fired a woman over such a small dispute over pay as 2 and a half pence. This can be shown when he says, 'Why shouldn't they try for higher wages? And I don't see why she should have been sacked just because she'd a bit more spirit than the others.' Mr. Birling stands by himself, believing that he had done the correct thing when he says, 'I can't accept any responsibility.' Sheila Birling, Arthur Birling's daughter, was the second member of the family to be connected to Eva Smith. Eva Smith was working in a shop called Milwards when Sheila paid a visit there to but a dress. Sheila became displeased with Eva's attitude when she caught a glimpse of her smirking at her in the mirror when she was trying a dress on. Sheila complained, and as a regular customer, she got the girl sacked. Sheila took the fact that she had done this to heart and felt exceptionally bitter that she could have done such a thing that may have ended a girl's life. This can be shown when she said 'Don't you understand? And if I could help her now, I would-'. Sheila is very shocked when it is revealed to her that Eva Smith took her own life, and Sheila instantly believes that it is all her fault that Eva is now dead, especially because Sheila got Eva fired because she was jealous of her good looks. Eric Birling, Arthur Birling's daughter, was also connected to the death of Eva Smith in and was directly in contact with her, which comes as a great shock to his family when it is revealed on page 49. Eric played a major part in Eva Smith's life for a few months when they were having an affair. During this period, Eva became pregnant with Eric's baby. When Eric is told about the death of Eva, it is obvious that he believes that he played no part in her death and that it was all his own mothers fault. This can be shown when he says 'you killed her. She came to you to protect me "“ and you turned her away "“ yes, and you killed her "“ and the child she'd had too "“ my child "“ your own grandchild "“ you killed them both "“ damn you, damn you -'. This passage shows that Eric might have actually felt something for Eva, in contradiction to what he told the inspector when he said 'I wasn't in love with her or anything'. Eric obviously tried very hard to make life as comfortable as possible for Eva Smith as well, so he may not be one of the major contributors to Eva's death, Eric believes that his mother Mrs. Birling is the one who killed Eva. Mrs. Birling, the wife of Arthur Birling, is seen by Eric to be the one to have killed Eva Smith. This is because she turned Eva away from the organisation that she chaired because she felt that the story that Eva Smith was telling was false and that Mrs. Birling also didn't like the fact that Eva had used the name Mrs. Birling when she came in front of the committee. The real Mrs. Birling didn't like this, so she used her power to reject Eva's case. Mrs. Birling, however, doesn't think that she has herself to blame for the death of Eva Smith. This can be shown when she says 'I think she had only herself to blame.' Mrs. Birling also felt that she would have done anything wrong even if Eva Smith hadn't used Mrs. Birling as her name. This can be shown where Mrs. Birling says 'I did nothing that I'm ashamed of that won't bear investigation"¦I consider I did my duty.' These few examples could argue that Mrs. Birling is quite arrogant and believes that she is always right and that anything she does will never need justifying. The last character to investigate is the fiancé of Sheila, Gerald Croft. Gerald is another character who had had very close ties to Eva Smith, or as her name was at this point ion history, Daisy Renton. At the start of his relationship with Sheila, Gerald had an affair with Daisy. It doesn't appear that ht ending of this relationship with Daisy, however, had much to do with the death of Daisy or Eva. This can be shown when Gerald says 'She told me she'd been happier than she'd ever been before'. This shows that the affair that Daisy had with Gerald didn't really do much for the breaking down of Eva into her taking her own life. This shows that Gerald didn't really have much to do with the death of Eva Smith, but more with the keeping of Eva Smith happy. All of the five characters were all connected with Eva Smith or Daisy Renton, but only three of them, Sheila, Arthur and Mrs. Birling, made Eva or Daisy unhappy as a consequence of their actions. Arthur fired Eva and put her out onto the streets, but she was happy again when she found another job at Milwards. This means that Arthur shouldn't carry a lot of the blame for the death of Eva. Sheila complained about Eva and succeeded in getting her fired from her new job. This put Eva out onto the streets. This must have brought her close to unhappiness, but Gerald than had an affair with her, which picked her off the floor and made her happy again. Eric then slept with Eva and got her pregnant, but he supported her with money to make sure that she would be all right. Mrs. Birling then turned Eva Smith away from the help that she desperately required for the caring of the baby that she was going to have. This seemed like the last straw for Eva, and when she was rejected, she felt it was one too many and took her own life. This means that the majority of the blame must lie with Mrs. Birling, although a small part would lie with Arthur for setting the ball rolling, and with Sheila for helping her along the way.
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There are five characters who can be linked to the death of Eva Smith. All of the members of the Birling family and Sheila Birling's fiancé Gerald Croft. All of these five characters will be looked at separately before an opinion is drawn. Mr. Birling is connected to Eva Smith in the fact that he employed her as a worker in his factory. After Eva led a strike over pay, Mr. Birling fired her and Eva found herself on the streets. Mr. Birling's son Eric found the fact that her father Arthur had fired a woman over such a...
her with money to make sure that she would be all right. Mrs. Birling then turned Eva Smith away from the help that she desperately required for the caring of the baby that she was going to have. This seemed like the last straw for Eva, and when she was rejected, she felt it was one too many and took her own life. This means that the majority of the blame must lie with Mrs. Birling, although a small part would lie with Arthur for setting the ball rolling, and with Sheila for helping her along the way.

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Throughout "Journeys End", R C Sherriff...Throughout "Journeys End", R C Sherriff re-creates, for the audience, the reality of World War One. He also shows the conditions and the tremendous stress and fear suffered by the men at the front. The play is set in Flanders, in Belgium, where much of World War One was fought. It is set in the later part of World War One. World War One was fought using trench warfare. Soldiers each took turns at working in the line until they were given leave, which sometimes wasn't for a long time. The soldiers showed tremendous courage and spirit to continue working and fighting every day even when their tasks sometimes seemed impossible. The play, "Journeys End" was written about ten years after the First World War, by a soldier who fought in the war, and since then it has been translated into every European language. It is the only play of its era that is still popular today. R.C.Sherriff chose a very wide range of contrasting characters, which help us to understand how different characters would react in certain situations. Most people have similar characteristics to at least one of the characters in the play. The characters reactions helps us to realise how bad some of the situations really are. A good example of this is when Hibbert, a grown man, is reduced to tears when Stanhope won't allow him to go home sick. "Every sound up here makes me all-cold and sick" Hibbert "“ Act Two: Scene Two This line really shows how Hibbert can't bare the life in the front line and how the conditions were really too much for a large number of men. He is scared. Hibbert couldn't deal with the situation. He tried to get out of it by faking illness. The characters were under an enormous amount of pressure. They suffered from tremendous stress. In some cases, such as Stanhope's, this can cause sudden mood swings. "Look here, Osborne, I'm commanding this company. I ask for advice when I want it!" Stanhope "“ Act Two: Scene One This time, Osborne is the innocent victim of Stanhope's short temper, which was a result of his time in the front line. "His nerves have all got battered to bits" says Osborne. This has shortened his temper. He is very anxious. All of the characters have ways of dealing with the trench warfare. Stanhope knows that he is lucky to be alive after three years of fighting. He believes that it will soon be his turn to die. He is living in fear. The only way he knows to ease the fear is drink. Because of his time in the front line, he has become dependant on alcohol. "Damn the soup!, Bring some whisky!" Stanhope "“ Act One: Scene One He uses the drink to cushion the reality and to try to forget about the war. Raleigh is new to the front line. At home, they were sheltered from the reality of the war. Because he doesn't know how bad things can be, he fails to see the bad side of some of the situations that he is placed in. He doesn't have to cope with as much as the other officers. I think that R.C.Sherriff uses Raleigh to show how uninformed the people at home were of the conditions in the front line. Osborne tries not to show his emotions. He attempts to look as though he is unaffected by the conditions that he has to face on a daily basis. Other officers, such as Trotter, imagine that they are in a normal situation. Some of the conditions that R.C.Sherriff describes in the play are unimaginable to people in the modern world. Not only do they face the constant fear of death, but also they don't even have hygienic living conditions. The water that they drink is disinfected because it is so dirty and could otherwise cause illness. "Don't have too much, it's rather strong today." Hardy "“ Act One: Scene One The men have to dilute it with whisky. The disinfectant that is in the water makes it unpleasant to drink. The sleeping conditions aren't much better. "That's mine. The ones in the dug-out haven't got any bottoms to them. You keep yourself in by hanging your arms and legs over the sides. Mustn't hang them too low, or the rats gnaw your boots." Osborne "“ Act One: Scene One The beds don't even have bottoms too them. The men don't even get a proper rest when they are asleep at night. This quote also tells us how the rats crawl about everywhere. "I should say- roughly- about two million; but I don't see them all." Osborne "“ Act One: Scene One There are more rats than humans out in the trenches. This is very unhygienic. Some of the conversations that the men have reveal a lot about the stress that they are feeling and the fear that they face every day. During Act two, Scene two, when Hibbert tries to go home sick, you can see how scared the men really are. "I feel the same- exactly the same! Every noise up here makes me feel- just as you feel. ["¦] We all feel like you do sometimes, if only you knew. I hate and loathe it all. Sometimes I feel I could just lie down on this bed and pretend I was paralysed or something- and couldn't move- and just lie there until I died- or was dragged away." Stanhope "“ Act Two: Scene Two All the men share the same fear of death. They are all suffering out in the front line. Other conversations reveal the characters true emotions. At the end of the play, when Raleigh dies, he and Stanhope have a very deep conversation, in which Stanhope refers to him as "Jimmy" which must be the name that he used to call Raleigh at home, outside of the war. This shows how much he really cares for Raleigh and how he views him as kind of a family member. Another way that R.C.Sherriff re-creates the reality of World War One and the stress that the men suffer from is that he builds up tension in the scenes. In Act Two, Scene One, Raleigh writes a letter home to his sister about his first day or so in the front line. Stanhope's anger and aggression build quite quickly. Stanhope fears that Raleigh will write home to his sister and tell her how Stanhope drinks all of the time and how he has changed as a person. He uses the law that he is supposed to read and censor all of the letters home to his advantage. "It's the rule that letters must be read." Stanhope "“ Act Two: Scene One When Raleigh declines, he quickly changes to: "Give me that letter!" and "D'you understand an order?" After this, Stanhope and Raleigh stare wide eyed at each other, creating tremendous tension. This tension clearly shows Stanhopes frustration that has been building up for ages, purely through stress. You can really see what Stanhope is going through. Another point in the play when there is a lot of tension, is the night after the raid. The men are all eating and drinking the food and drink that has been provided and smoking the cigars, when Stanhope tells Hibbert to go to bed, as he is to go on duty at eleven. Hibbert replies with a sarcastic comment. After this the conversation heats up. The following argument ends with Stanhope shouting at Hibbert. "Get out of my sight!" Stanhope "“ Act Three: Scene Two The following pause creates great tension. The anxiety of the great attack that is due to take place the next day is really beginning to show. The men are obviously very nervous. After reading Journeys End, I now know a lot more information about what life was really like for a soldier in the front line. R.C.Sherriff has been successful in realistically informing a reader of the conditions that the men faced and the tremendous stress and fear suffered by the men. The ways he used to present the information were extremely clear. He created a character for every type of person, which helped me understand what they were suffering. I think that the ways that R.C.Sherriff presented details of the conditions was very clever. Just one sentence can tell us so much about a particular subject, for example the water supply the disinfectant in the water, the germs in it. I think that the conversations that the men have are very true to what the men would really be feeling. They show the ongoing fear of the men. The tension in the scenes really highlights the stress that the men are suffering. Different people have viewed the play in different ways. Some say that the play has a message for peace however those who were not pacifist found that it supported their opinion too. The play shows the soldiers spirit in difficult situations. The carried out orders that sometimes they didn't agree with, but still put on a brave face.   

Throughout "Journeys End", R C Sherriff re-creates, for the audience, the reality of World War One. He also shows the conditions and the tremendous stress and fear suffered by the men at the front. The play is set in Flanders, in Belgium, where much of World War One was fought....

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Romeo and Juliet is about two...Romeo and Juliet is about two people who love each other but, because their families are enemies, they cannot be together. From that their love ultimately causes their deaths. Which is referred to many times throughout the play. It is a play written by Shakespeare that is in the genre of a romantic tragedy, because the two lovers die from their love for each other. In this play there are a lot of different types of drama such as tragedy, romance, comedy, action and suspense. I think that Shakespeare has made Romeo and Juliet appeal to a wide audience by having the many different kinds of drama in it. This will appeal to many people as it fulfils many different tastes in plays and literature. Act 3 Scene 5 is the very last time the two protagonists meet directly except on each other's deathbeds. This scene takes us away from all the dangers in the play and directly focuses on each other's love for the other. It is set on a Tuesday morning after a romantic night after their marriage the previous day. It is also the morning in which Romeo must leave Verona and flee to Mantua. The two lovers are having a light debate about whether it is morning or still night. This argument is not aggressive but is fictitious and romantic. They express this by using language such as 'Wilt though be gone? It is not near day"¦' and 'Look love, what envious streaks Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east' The argument is about whether it is day or night. This is supposed to reflect the light-dark imagery in the play. Romeo believes it is day and realises if he does not leave for Mantua he will be killed. This shows light means that everything is in perspective and they must be serious. Juliet believes it is night and believes it is dark so Romeo can stay longer. This dark imagery means they can escape from reality. Romeo then jokes 'come death and welcome' This is ironic because it is as if he is prepared to die for his wife, Juliet. He knows this is the last time he will see her without having the pain of death. This allows the audience into the plots secret that Romeo will die for Juliet in the end. After Romeo has left Juliet is left crying in her room. 'That same villain Romeo' 'Villain and he be many miles asunder- God pardon him; I do with all my heart; And yet no man like he doth grieve my heart.' 'That is because the traitor murderer lives.' This conversation is ambiguous and is cleverly written to seem like lady Capulet knows exactly what is wrong with Juliet but in reality she has no idea. Again the theme of appearance and reality is important in this scene however throughout the play Shakespeare refers to it many times. This part of the scene is quite funny, Juliet and her mother are having a normal conversation. If you follow the conversation through in Lady Capulets perspective they are talking about a traitor killing Tybalt. The traitor being Romeo. However through Juliet's eyes we know she is talking about missing Romeo and that the traitor is Tybalt, as he has led to Romeo's banishment. It is extremely ironic that to the present day adults or older people have always been the most respected and usually more mature in matters. They are usually wiser and have more life experience, yet, in this play the older people seem to be keeping this 'ancient grudge' going and do not at any moment seem to want to settle their differences. For example Lady Capulet says this about Romeo. 'We will have vengeance for it, fear though not"¦' She then explains to Juliet that she shall send someone to Mantua to kill Romeo. This shows she believes that the punishment was not sufficient and has decided Romeo's fate for him. At the beginning of the play Juliet is more obedient and agrees to meet Paris at a feast. 'I'll look to like, if looking liking move. But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.' However, now she doesn't want to even look at Paris because she is already married and is still upset about Romeo leaving. In the Elizabethan times their views on wedding vows was sacred and you would be sent to hell if you were to not follow them. She therefore realises she must not accept the offer of marriage, or else she will go to hell. Capulet wishes to marry off Juliet as quick as he can because, as he did at the beginning of the play, he is trying to marry her into a rich family, such as Paris', to get money, which the nurse refers to earlier in the play. 'So shall you share all that he doth possess, By having him, making yourself no less.' When Juliet refuses to marry Paris Capulet looses his temper. He shouts and really becomes aggressive. He says he will disown her and throw Juliet out into the streets. He believes that Juliet's not grateful for the care she has got all her life from her Family. After Capulet leaves still in a fury Juliet looks at Lady Capulet as if she should be comforting and was hoping for some comforting, though Lady Capulet says she is done with her and leaves showing she has taken her husbands side on the matter. This shows that the parent's authority isn't negotiable in any way. The nurse gives Juliet the advice to follow her Fathers orders and persuades her to forget Romeo. She calls him a dishcloth compared to Paris. Juliet asks the nurse to go and apologise to her mother for her disobedience, tell her she will be at the church on Thursday and to apologise to her father and say she is sorry for neglecting him. Also that she is going to go and confess to Friar Lawrence. When the nurse has gone she expresses her true feelings on the matter. She has other ideas in mind, she will go and ask Friar Lawrence's advice and sees him as the only person she can trust after the nurses treachery.   

Romeo and Juliet is about two people who love each other but, because their families are enemies, they cannot be together. From that their love ultimately causes their deaths. Which is referred to many times throughout the play. It is a play written by Shakespeare that is in the genre...

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Shakespeare wrote the play Julius Caesar...Shakespeare wrote the play Julius Caesar in 1599. The play is supposedly based on a true Roman story about the assassination of Caesar, but nobody is completely sure. In its time, Julius Caesar would have appealed to the Elizabethan audience because the assassination of a person as important as Caesar was very bad, so portraying it on stage would be very exciting for the audience. Carrying any type of sword or knife whilst walking through the streets of England was frowned upon and would probably carry the death penalty, so using them on stage would be a very interesting and exciting thing for the people to see. In the few scenes leading up to the speeches in Act III Scene II, Brutus has gathered a group of people who dislike Caesars way of ruling the country: they decide they are going to assassinate him. At the time of the murder it is Brutus who stabs Caesar, and Caesar, who thought Brutus his friend, says "Et too, Brute", which means 'you as well, Brutus?'. This implies that it is not so much the conspiracy that hurt him, more the fact that even his best friend wanted to kill him, a view point which is enforced in the succeeding lines until Caesar's death. The play continues to the point where the speeches start. At the time of Caesar's death, before they find out about it, the citizens of Rome are celebrating Caesar's defeat of Pompey. They have been dancing around the street, paying no attention or respect to any of the people who are more important than themselves. We know from this that the people of Rome are very fickle, as they had been supporting Pompey until Caesar defeated him, at which time they decided that Caesar ruled. Brutus has already agreed to let Mark Anthony make Caesars eulogy. In this he made a grave mistake, as Mark Anthony plans to create civil uprising in Rome against Brutus and his fellow conspirators. Although Brutus is often portrayed to the audience as a villain, he shows his integrity and nobility as well as his naivety by giving Antony an open floor, and by insisting that the civilians stay to listen to Antony after his own departure. Not only does this give Antony a free reign to say what he likes, but it also gives him the advantage of speaking last, giving him the opportunity of a final, uncontested manipulation of the civilians. Brutus speaks in prose, which he hopes will make the plebeians feel he is on their level "“ but instead it patronises them. Antony however, speaks in blank verse, which shows that he is intellectual and so he gains the respect of the crowd. When speaking in blank verse, there would be ten syllables in each line of the speech, and the rhythm would gain the attention of the crowd. The start of Brutus' speech reflects his values and personal priorities: he starts his speech with "Romans, Countrymen, and Lovers", showing he is strongly patriotic and values patriotism in other people. This is why he addresses the people as a nation of Romans, as opposed to Antony's "Friends"¦", and opening that shows a successful, personal touch to the civilians of Rome. When Brutus enters the stage, he has his arms up in the air, covered with Caesar's blood. This is a very dramatic effect used by Shakespeare, as his draws the attention of the crowd towards Brutus. However, Antony enters by walking onto the stage carrying Caesar's dead body in his arms, which would have an even more dramatic effect. It also shows to the crowd how much Antony cared for Caesar, carrying his body regardless of all the blood. Brutus is the first of the two to speak to the citizens. He approaches the crowd by stating that his reason for killing Caesar was not that he did not love Caesar, but that he loved Rome more. Specifically, he says: 'Brutus rose against Caesar, that is my answer: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more' III, ii, 21-22 This quote almost proves and summarizes Brutus' point in his speech. To achieve his goals, Brutus' oratory techniques were simple, logical and rational. Brutus' speech is very formal and controlled, and it seems that al of the sentences are perfectly balanced. Although he did a very good job at explaining to the citizens that assassinating Caesar was for the good of Rome, he still had not proved to them that what he had done was good. Brutus then continues to explain again that he loved Caesar, but also how his death was for the good of Rome. 'As Caesar loved me, I weep for him'. Brutus explains here that he still cared for Caesar and he also explains that Caesar was not good for Rome as he was ambitious: 'But as he was ambitious, I slew him.' Brutus entered the stage looking at a confused and curious crowd. After he explained all his reasons for killing their beloved ruler, the people rejoiced for him and respected him, yet they were convinced for only a short while. Brutus leaves the scene and the stand for Antony to speak. Antony begins by explaining that he only wants to bury Caesar, not praise him. Antony explains that he does not wish to disgrace Brutus' honorable name. "But Brutus says he is ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man". This quote proves how Antony kept mentioning about Brutus and the Conspirators. Although he repeatedly quotes that Brutus is an honorable man, he means the opposite. Antony wants mutiny against the Conspirators. Antony's technique, although, was very original. His use of repetition created a sense of sarcasm about Brutus and the Conspirators when he repeatedly referred to them as "honorable men". Antony made use of mentioning that Caesar was not ambitious for three reasons: he refused the crown three times, he did not pocket the money, rather, he put it in the treasury, and he wept for the poor. By saying this, Antony hoped to get the attention of the crowd counteracting Brutus' statement of Caesar being ambitious. Also, Antony makes good use of Caesars will and the dead body. He tries to entice the crowd by referring to the will, which offered seventy five drachma to each citizen as well as Caesar's land to be used for a public park. At first, the people were against Antony, due to Brutus' previous speech. Antony did an excellent job of persuading the crowd and moving them to mutiny, which was his original purpose, although, it was Antony's appeal to the crowds emotions that ultimately swayed them to his side. In conclusion, both Brutus and Antony's speeches were very important to the story so that the point could be lead across of Caesar's death. Both characters shared their opinions and in the end, one got the approval of the crowd. In this, Antony did a very good job of moving the crowd to mutiny.   

Shakespeare wrote the play Julius Caesar in 1599. The play is supposedly based on a true Roman story about the assassination of Caesar, but nobody is completely sure. In its time, Julius Caesar would have appealed to the Elizabethan audience because the assassination of a person as important as Caesar...

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