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In this essay I will be looking at two stories one written in the nineteenth century "The signalman" and the other in the twentieth century "Lamb to the Slaughter". I will look at these two stories and compare all the similarities and differences between them, especially in terms of style, content and language. At the beginning of Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter" Dahl sets the scene very well by using a lot of adjectives, this gives the reader a better description of where and when the story is set "the room was warm and clean the curtains drawn, the two table lamps alight "“ hers and the one by the empty chair opposite." "There was a slow smiling air about her" From these quotes we can see that Dahl has set the scene and it is happy and relaxed. At the beginning of "The Signalman" Dickens begins with speech, this makes you want to read on I think, he also uses the narrator to make the story more interesting. These are two very different ways of beginning a story, the readers expectation depends on how they interpret the beginning but I think that Dahl tried to make the reader ask them self who is this woman waiting why is she so happy, but Dickens on the other hand wants the reader to think who is this shouting who is this person telling the story, both beginnings make you want to read on. Dahl creates suspense by building the scene and using a lot of adjectives, this helps build up the suspense very well. Dickens builds suspense by keeping the characters very secretive so the reader is always asking questions so they will read on this I think is a very good way of building suspense. We aren't told what Patrick says to Mary in "Lamb to the Slaughter" because this would be a bit of a predictable story, I think not being told also creates more suspense. Where "Lamb to the slaughter" is set at home adds to the story it is homely but at the same time deadly because anything can happen behind closed doors "the room was warm and clean the curtains drawn, the two table lamps alight "“ hers and the one by the empty chair opposite." "The Signalman" is set in a valley like place on a train track this sets a scary mood because down there anything could happen "his post was in as solitary and dismal a place as ever I saw". Both of the stories were written at different times "Lamb to the Slaughter" in the twentieth century and "The signalman" in the nineteenth century so the styles are very different. "Lamb to the slaughter" is written in the third person and so there is lots of direct speech, but "The Signalman is written in the first person and so there is not really any direct speech. I think direct speech is better and adds more to the story. I think the language used by Dickens, because it is older makes the story more eerie. The stories do have different purposes I think they both have morals but they are very different in the way that I think Dahl wrote his story with a moral but also made the story funny to prove that not all stories have to be serious to have a moral. On the other hand, Dickens wrote his story to warn people. Dickens didn't support new technology like trains and so wanted to warn people about the terrible tragedies that could happen. Dahl, on the other hand, wanted to express that even if you love someone they can still make you angry enough to kill them. I think both of the authors use the same sort of main characters even though the stories were completely different! Both of the characters had been very nervous and unsure about themselves. I think the authors used violence and death to put across their stories because it grabs people's attention and makes them think about what is going on in the stories. I don't think it is very important that the stories are written in the First person or the third person "she might as well have hit him with a steel club" "I was not sure, I told him that I did fully understand" these ways of telling the story are just as good as each other. Dickens wrote about a train killing someone because people were afraid of trains in those days, in 1866 trains were relatively a new invention. Dickens didn't support new technology and trains so in his story he could express his dislike for train and warm people of what they could do. Dahl's massage had more of a moral to it the concerns about the rights and wrongs murder. He used Mary Maloney as an example that murder is a spur of the moment thing and you can even use the anger to hurt someone you love. This shows that both writers suggested in their stories that new technology is not always helpful for example trains, forensic science-finger printing etc. For the time we are in now Dahl is more up to date and writes for a more modern audience and often his work is written for television and radio, he would assume that his readers would know what a typical household would look like because they would have seem many on the television. This is because Dahl's story was written in 1979 when the TV and radon had been invented "she carried it upstairs, holding the thin bone-end of it with both her hands, and she went through the living room she saw him." This quote does not use a lot of description about what the living room and stairs etc looked like because it would be the same as on TV every other suburban household. Dickens wrote his story in a lot more detail because people only had access to books and written words they would need to build a picture of this story in their imaginations, and because this story was a ghost story this would have thrilled and excited them. Televisions were not invented when this story was written in 1866 "there was a fire, a desk for an official book in which he had to make certain entries, a telegraphic instrument with its dial, face, and needles, and a little bell of which he had spoken." This quote uses a lot of description because if you had a TV you would have probably seen an example of a signalman box or a little hut before but because the television hadn't been invented Dickens had to use a lot of description. I have found the difference between these two stories are, "The signalman" is supernatural "Lamb to the Slaughter" is not, both writers have a serious but different purpose for writing their stories, both writers suggest that modern science and technology don't give you all the answers in life, both have central characters who have seem to have "lost their minds", both writers involve violence and death in their stories to draw the readers attention, and the ending to both stories had a twist which in both of the stories I did not expect. "Lamb to the Slaughter" is very funny but at the same time ends on a cliff hanger, but "The signalman" is not really a cliff hanger but leaves you thinking.
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In this essay I will be looking at two stories one written in the nineteenth century "The signalman" and the other in the twentieth century "Lamb to the Slaughter". I will look at these two stories and compare all the similarities and differences between them, especially in terms of style, content and language. At the beginning of Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter" Dahl sets the scene very well by using a lot of adjectives, this gives the reader a better description of where and when the story is set "the room was warm and clean the curtains drawn, the...
but different purpose for writing their stories, both writers suggest that modern science and technology don't give you all the answers in life, both have central characters who have seem to have "lost their minds", both writers involve violence and death in their stories to draw the readers attention, and the ending to both stories had a twist which in both of the stories I did not expect. "Lamb to the Slaughter" is very funny but at the same time ends on a cliff hanger, but "The signalman" is not really a cliff hanger but leaves you thinking.

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For both stories that I have...For both stories that I have selected H.G. Wells and The Red Room, Conan Doyle and The Clubfooted Grocer each writer has used plenty of different techniques to create tension and suspense. Each of the techniques holds their own importance in the role of creating tension and suspense. Language, context gothic influences, withheld information and imagery are all of the techniques that I will be reviewing and comparing between each of the stories. In The Red Room there are many references to darkness, isolation and old places, which is a typical gothic setting. The Red Room is set in a castle, which people often associate with isolation and if you are isolated then the only people that can help you are far away thus creating tension and suspense because the writer is implying that there is to be death or some kind of violent activity. A good example of the type of setting in The Red Room is " The long draughty"¦shadows cower and quiver " because it has a reference to darkness where the writer has mentioned that there is a candle and there are shadows. This entails that it is dark and there is only a primitive lighting system, which implies that vision is impaired so you might not be able to see trouble when it is coming towards you. This also builds up tension and suspense, as there are constant subtle hints to violence and death. Also in that last quote the writer describes that " the shadows cower and quiver " and the technique used here is personification, which makes the shadows sound like they are alive and that they are like ghosts, which hints towards the supernatural. Strange noises and weird things like "the queer old mirror" surround the castle and " the door creaked " which again is a subtle hint towards he supernatural. There are many more references to the darkness where the writer is constantly trying to put the fact toward the reader that the narrator has impaired vision and that it is night-time which is when supernatural things mostly occur e.g. "looked up the blackness of the wide chimney " and " the dark oak panelling ". It is very much the same kind of point Doyle is trying to get across in The Club Footed Grocer. There are constant references to isolation and darkness e.g. " desolate rolling plains ", " depressing country" and " bleak and sad and stern ". These are all references to isolation, which means that there are no means of help and law and order. This is a good way of implying that there is going to be some kind of violent action later on in the story and that the people involved will have to deal with it themselves rather than gain the help from some kind of authority. In The Red Room, there are many uses of language, which create tension and suspense. The writer uses imagery many times. He uses personification when mentioning the shadows " a shadow came sweeping up after me ", " but its shadow fell"¦someone crouching to waylay me " which increases the supernatural feel to the story and creates the feeling that the shadows are out to get the narrator. When Wells wanted a fast, very active scene, he uses a technique called verbs of action. This is where instead of using normal verbs like "walked" he uses many other verbs like " dashed ", " snatched " and " thrust " which increases the pace and creates more of a sense of tension and suspense. Doyle also uses this technique when there is a fast paced, violent scene where there is a fight " lashed ", " whirled ", " cried " and " seized " as it increase tension and suspense. Doyle also uses short sentences " won't tell, won't you? We'll see about that! Get him ready, Jim! " Which create pace, tension and suspense. In The Clubfooted Grocer, Doyle uses " dark language " to create tension and suspense by making Steven Maples house seem like a prison " The inmates"¦rasping of locks and clattering of bars " which entail that Steven Maple is a prisoner in his own home and has to lock himself in securely for his own safety which also hints towards violent action later on in the story. This is a very good way of creating tension and suspense. In both of the stories information is withheld. In The Red Room, Wells has not given out any information about the room, what haunts it or the history of it. You eventually find out that fear is haunting the room but because the information is withheld it creates tension and suspense as it makes you very involved in the story. It makes the reader more involved in the plot, as your imagination is needed to think about what might haunt the room and who the apparent ghost is. In The Club Footed Grocer, Doyle uses withheld information when John Maple receives the letter from his Uncle. Doyle doesn't say why Steven Maple wants the services of his nephew or why he wants him to bring a gun. This creates tension and suspense because you think that there will be violence as John is told to bring his gun and you start to feel fear for John Maple because he is naïve because he sees this trip as an "adventure" and he probably doesn't know that he will encounter violence. Each of the writers has used characterisation as a key part of creating tension and suspense. In the Red room, Wells has made the three old people particularly vivid by his description. He has made them all very old "the old woman ", " pale eyes ", " decaying yellow teeth ", " withered arm " and " ancient faces " which has made the feel of the story change as people often associate the old with death and death with the supernatural and so the story now implies tat there is going to be some kind of death or supernatural activity that is going to happen. The narrator is very cynical and because it is a gothic horror story written in the Victorian era, many of the people reading it will have been able to sympathise and relate with him as he is a middle class Victorian which will be the majority of the readers of this story. The Victorians were very cynical and often tried to explain things by logic so he is a typical Victorian. And when the readers have related themselves with the narrator then they will experience the emotions that the narrator is feeling. This creates a very large sense of tension and suspense for the reader as they are now involved in the story. In The Club Footed Grocer, the narrator, John Maple, is a middle class, educated Victorian gentleman. Many of the readers of this story when it was first published, would have been Victorian gentleman so they would have been able to relate to the narrator. Like most of the middle class, young Victorians, he is naïve of life outside educated people and the law. So he has no idea of what he is about to encounter and feels that the journey to his uncles is an " adventure " even though there is a hint that he will encounter violence as he is told to bring his gun. Because Steven Maple has already been described as an unsavoury character we can assume that the help that he needs is not legal and is to do with some trouble he has caused. This is an implication that there will be some kind of violence later on in the story. When John Maple is going to his uncle's house he encounters a man who was described as " a burly fellow " and " rough ". He also had earrings " the glint of earrings in his ears " and all these things put together would mean that he is an unpleasant character to a Victorian audience. I conclude that the two stories may have very different plots and story lines but they both use the same techniques. The techniques used are typical gothic horror story techniques used to create tension and suspense. In my opinion, the most effective of all the techniques used is withheld information as it leads you to guess at what is going to happen. When the lot unfolds the story makes sense and you remember all the things that were withheld previously in the story and it all fits together.  

For both stories that I have selected H.G. Wells and The Red Room, Conan Doyle and The Clubfooted Grocer each writer has used plenty of different techniques to create tension and suspense. Each of the techniques holds their own importance in the role of creating tension and suspense. Language, context...

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Dulce Et Decorum est, written... Dulce Et Decorum est, written by Wilfred Owen is a very realistic and brutal poem about the First World War. In his poem he describes the terrible conditions of which many Soldiers had to live, fight and for many soldiers die in. This contrasts greatly with the poem The Soldier written by Rupert Brooke. The Soldier is a very passionate patriotic poem about The First World War. The Soldier was written at the beginning of The First World War, whilst the whole Country was full with enthusiasm and with a patriotic feel. Although Rupert Brooke wrote about the War, he himself never made it there as he died on the journey there. This again may be another reason for his enthusiasm, as he had never experienced the grim and harsh reality of War. Dulce Et Decorum est was written towards the very end of the War, where most of the Country was tired and bitter of fighting. Wilfred Owen, the writer of Dulce Et Decorum est, had fought in the War and had experienced the horrific conditions of War. This is maybe the reason he decided to use the highly ironic title Dulce Et Decorum Est, which is a famous line created by the well-known academic Horace. It means it is sweet and fitting to fight for your country. This has a great contrast to the poems tone and content. The content of both of these poems has great relevance to the First World War. The Soldier has great means of pride, patriotism and religious content: "In hearts at peace, under an English heaven". By concentrating on these elements, Rupert Brooke creates a very different poem to Dulce Et Decorum est. In the first stanza he writes of how if he were to die in war, a corner of a foreign field will be "for ever England." This is very patoratic as it shows the reader, that he has no fear. He follows by decribing England as a beautiful land full of freedom, "Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam." This again is very patoratic as it shows the readers,potential soldiers, that England is something worth fighting for. He starts his next stanza by describing his own psyical and mental fight for his country, "And think, this heart, all evil shed away." This shows how he is not jut fighting for his Country he is also fighting a mental battle within himself. He follows by describing himself as a "pulse in the eternal mind." Which shows he is well aware he is only a very small piece of a large plan.It could also mean he is in pulse with God and that he believes God is backing them.This gives the reader great confidence as it shows that if God is backing them they must be in the right and therefore they will win.He then finishes the poem by using strong passionate personification to describe England, "Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day."This is another form of patronism as it gives the reader great pride for England. In Wilfred Owen's poem his point of view on the War is very different. He writes about treacherous events vividly which causes very clear images: "Gas! Gas"¦yelling out and stumbling". This vivid explanation causes a very clear disturbing picture, which makes the reader think of those who fought for their Country and those who died doing it. This therefore sends the reader a very different view of war. He starts Dulce Et Decorum est by describing the shocking state of which all soldiers were in and the horrific condition which they lived and fought in, "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge." He then describes a vivid gas attack by using strong description and imagary, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! "“ An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling, And flound"ring like a man in fire or lime." This is very penetrating as the strong imagary make you imagine the shocking conditions and the sudden attack. This therefore makes the prospect of the war a reality. His last stanza starts by describing the attack effect of the gas attack, "His hanging face, like a devil"s sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs." This is very frightening for the reader as you can vividly imagine it. It would also be frightening if you had family or friends in the war as it is very easy to imagine the horrific death happening to one of them. In the final stanza, Owen enforces that, should readers see what he has seen, the government would cease to send young men to war, all the while instilling visions of glory in their heads. No longer would they tell them the old lie, "Dulce Et Decorum est." The language used in The Soldier has many different descriptive techniques. Rupert Brooke decides to use personification to describe England: "Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day". This effect echances the certain theme of patronism around the poem, this is because the reader thinks of England as a woman and therefore something worth fighting for. He also uses a few examples of alliteration which is very promanent in old English poems. Alliterations has a gratifying effect on the sound, which gives a reinforcement to stresses, and can also serve as a subtle connection or emphasis of key words in a line, "And laughter, learnt of friends; and geltleness". Dulce et Decorum est also includes very clever and effective descriptive words which creates imminant images. He uses imagery in his poem so he is albe to create a picture in the readers mind which is needed to feel the full force of the poem "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge." He also uses repetition, which is very effective and therefore creates a certain feel for the poem, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!" The tone of The Soldier is very different to the one of Dulce et Decorum as it has very different content. The Soldier has a very uplifting tone this is acheived by using patroatic and romantic content. It is also very optimistic as it ideailized England, this is very unrealistic. On the other hand the tone of Dulce et decorum est is very realistic as is it shows the true, depressing facts of war. Both of the poems impact the reader greatly as they are both written about the same topic,War.The Soldiers impacts the reader by showing a patoratic romantic view of the war. This impacts the reader as it shows great courage and the strong proud atmosphere which was drilled into everyone.On the other hand Dulce Et Decorum Est was written towards the very end of the War and impacts the reader by describing the horrific death of a soldier after being attacked by a gas bomb.This impacts the reader greatly as Wilfred Owen uses many strong language tecniques to create a vivid image. Although both poems are very much about World War One, they are both very different. The Soldier was written during the beggining of the war when the whole country was full with patronism and belief. This is the reason for its upbeat tone and optimism. It is full with religious and patroatic content which is created using strong personiication and descriptions.Dulce Et Decorum est was written towards the end of the War,this is the reason for its very harsh realistic view on the war. Wilfred Owen writes about the shocking conditions and how a fellow soldier died whilst he stood their helpless. He uses strong imagary to create vivid images in the readers mind.   

Dulce Et Decorum est, written by Wilfred Owen is a very realistic and brutal poem about the First World War. In his poem he describes the terrible conditions of which many Soldiers had to live, fight and for many soldiers die in. This contrasts greatly with the poem The...

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In my opinion, Macbeth is... In my opinion, Macbeth is a tragic hero. I see a tragic hero as a character who is admired and loved and followed throughout the play, and is bought down by a flaw in their character followed by fate. Macbeth is a brave hero, highly ranked by his own family and society, as well as the country. I see the reason for this, however, as the following: He is a brute. He is a violent, blood-loving butcher, and these are the activities, which got him to the status at which he is, a general in the king's army, and Thane of Glamis. The witches would be seen as a supernatural presence in the play to the Shakespearian audience, whereas the modern audience would see logical explanations to all that happens. Macbeth has a violent character, and these witches could just be mad women who provoke his "dark side". However, the witches are presented in the play as women with supernatural powers who make the day turn to night which can be explained simply by a solar eclipse and who make him hallucinate; "is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle towards my hand...I have thee not, yet I see thee still"¦" The dagger leads Macbeth to the bedside of the king, where Macbeth kills king Duncan. This could have been controlled and planned by the witches, or could be Macbeth's mentality combined with his violent nature. However, if it is all controlled by the witches, this would show that Macbeth is not exactly responsible therefore the audience symapthise with him. King James I was very fascinated by witches and witchcraft, as was most the population at the time of shakespear. When Shakespeare wrote this for king James he made sure it would appeal to him. King James believed in witchcraft and supernatural powers. He believed that a group of witches attempted regicide against him. Including his ancestor, Banquo, in the story also assisted in allowing the king to see his own reflection in the play, especially in the scene of the 8 kings, where king James is the 8th king. "Thou shalt get kings, thought thou be none" this was said to Banquo in act 1 scene 3, coincidentally; Banquo is king James's ancestor. Even after the Shakespearian period, the public were fascinated by witchcraft. So fascinated, that they added another scene in the play, featuring Hecate, goddess of witchcraft. Act 3 scenes 5 The Shakespearian audience and the Elizabethan audience would have thought the witches to be the most powerful element in the play. The first scene and act of the play is of the witches. Theatrical effects, like thunder and lightning, are staged to add effects and intrigue the audience. Dark, gloomy and "evil" effects are used to represent the witches and their control over Macbeth. The first scene contains a mention of meeting Macbeth; this provides a clear link to him. The witches also discuss in which weather conditions they wish to meet; this could be waiting for the next particular conditions to meet in or choosing what weather situation to CREATE for their meeting with Macbeth. The witches plan to play with Macbeth's minds and lead him to the dark path on which they tread. This would interest the Elizabethan audience greatly, as they did not have our modern science and reasoning. The believed that witches did indeed exist, and had supernatural powers to control and amuse themselves with average human minds. An Elizabethan audience at Hampton Court in 1606 would have found this powerful and intriguing, and Shakespeare's portrayal of the witches on stage may have even left them feeling weary or shaken.] The atmosphere the witches seemed to create was magical; it was dark and dull yet powerful, and in some cases, amusing. They always seemed to appear when the weather conditions are poor or within a storm, and in darkness. ""¦Her choppy fingers"¦skinny lips"¦your beards"¦" This is Banquo"s description of the witches in Act 1 Scene 3, Macbeth and Banquo"s first encounter with the witches. "Her choppy fingers", meaning chapped, red and rough, would be common as they worked with their hands, in sowing, cooking etc. along with skinny lips. These were popular features for lower and working class women. However, they have beards, which were recognised as the uttermost ugliness in women, and showed that they are either cursed, or had a presence of masculinity in them. The speech is convincing yet fascinatingly powerful, for example, the use of riddles and antitheses "when the hurly-burly's done, when the battles lost and won" What else makes their speech interesting is that they use rhyme constantly, almost as if everything said is part of a bewitching continuous chant. The witches' powers are recognised and compared in Act 1 Scene 3. The following quotes will show what they are capable of: "¢"Killing swine" -Death of animals back then were always considered witch-related. "¢"In a sieve I'll tither sail" "“witches were thought able to sail in a sieve "¢"like a rat without a tail" "“witches were also thought to have the power to morph into any animal; however they would have no tail! "¢"I'll do, I'll do and I'll do" "“the witches threaten to cause the sailor harm and mischief using the above mentioned powers "¢"I'll give thee wind" "“able to cause the wind to blow "¢"I myself have all the others" "“this witch has powers over all winds to mischief. "¢ "All the quarters that they know I' the shipman's card" "“she can stop ships from docking safely so that he does not arrive ashore. "¢"Dwindle, peak and pine"¦bark cannot be lost yet it shall be tempest tost" "“the witch will make him thin, weak and frail and play a storm around his ship. When describing what they had done to the sailor's wife in Act 1 Scene 3, it is obvious that they had no respect or sympathy towards ordinary human beings: "Give me". Rather than asking the sailors wife to give her a chestnut, the witch ordered her to. "Rump-fed ronyon" "“this is an amusing quote but again shows the lack of respect the witches have for ordinary people. However, when they meet Macbeth and Banquo they use respectful terms; this may be mockery or an attempt to gain their trust so as to play on their minds. "All hail"¦" this phrase is used repeatedly, I believe it is to flatter Macbeth and to make him believe what they predict. The audience would be surprised and would have more reasons to believe in the witches as the predictions are revealed. The first prediction is "hail Macbeth, Thane of Cowdor". This would be a surprise as no one knows of the death of the Thane of Cowdor but the King and his court, and Macbeth believes that he still lives. There is no other explanation for the witches to know, other than that they have powers to get whatever knowledge they want. However, this prediction in my opinion should not be counted as so, as, even though Macbeth does not know, he has already in the previous scene been appointed Thane of Cowdor "Go pronounce his present death, and with his former title, greet Macbeth" The second prediction is "Hail Macbeth, that shalt be king hereafter"¦" There is already a king, king Duncan of Dunsinane. This causes confusion, but also, this is where the plot thickens, so to speak. Both Macbeth and the audience see this and wonder if it has a deeper meaning. The way the witches continue to speak with rhyme and rhythm and in riddles; the rhyme and rhythm make the speech interesting whilst the riddles provide the element of mystery. The audience are bound to jump to conclusions from the predictions, as Macbeth does. The predictions will draw the audience more into the play. Macbeth at first is surprised with the quick disappearance of the witches, and wishes that they would have stayed and told him more, this myself and probably the audience would believe was the witches plan, to leave Macbeth with this 'craving' for more information. In Act 1 Scene 4, Macbeth states "let not the light see my black and deep desires", Macbeth is hoping that the prediction is true and has faith, as the witches predicted that he would become Thane of Cowdor, and upon his arrival, Macbeth was given the title. He actually wishes to become king and hopes for his prediction to come true as the previous one did. This quote was said to king Duncan himself, and so he did not wish to reveal his desires to take king Duncan's place. When the King spends a night at Macbeths castle, Macbeth and his wife see the opportunity to murder him. Upon hearing of the witches, Lady Macbeth was eager to fulfil her own and her husband's 'destiny' that she believed lay in these prediction; she encouraged the murder of king Duncan. They planned the murder, and she encouraged him though this is only my view. The witches seemed to have played a stronger part in the murder of Duncan. Macbeth visualized a dagger before him leading him to Duncan's bedside, he was unable to touch the dagger until then; "Is this a dagger which I see before me"¦I have thee not yet I see thee still"¦" Macbeth murders the king and continues his life casually; this shocks the audience, as they no longer know whether to consider him a villain or a hero. In act 4 scene 1 Macbeth returns to the witches greedily, in my opinion, to find answers and more predictions. He wishes to know his future. When Macbeth first hears that he cannot be defeated by anyone "Woman born" he accepts his fate thinking no person can kill him, but he feels that he must know if Banquo blood will reign? "Shall Banquo's issue ever reign this kingdom?" This is where the 8 kings are shown and in the eighth king"s hands, a glass, which were to show king James reflection. King James was very fond of this particular play because he could see himself, his ancestor and his beliefs playing upon the stage before him. At the end of act2 scene 1, Macbeth realizes that whatever predictions the witches had made had and would continue to come true, and it was his own impatience that bought him the problems that he s now suffering. Before Macbeth is killed, he says "these juggling themes no more believed that patter with us in a double sense that keep the word of promise to ear, and break it to our hope, this is where he had realized the witches had given him a double meaning. Macduff had been born through a caesarean section, which meant he was "untimely ripped" from his mother's womb, not born naturally. I think Shakespeare intended us, as his audience, to feel a mixture of sympathy & offence, against Macbeth. He is shown throughout the play as a cold-blooded killer under the influence of witchcraft. At the end of the play the Elizabethan audience would have felt sympathy for Macbeth because he realizes he has been misled by the witches "these juggling themes no more believed that patter with us in a double sense"act 5 scene 8 The witches show indications throughout the play of there affect on Macbeth. For example his trace-like state, "look how our partners rapt" act1 scene 3. Also Macbeth's changed appearance " why do u make such faces" act1 scene 4, this maybe through the witches influence or his own guilty conscience. Macbeth also has an inability to pray, " Amen/ stuck in my throat"¦" This could e the witches and their evil ways distancing Macbeth from god, or Macbeth's own conscience punishing him for his own evil thoughts and doings. Hallucinations and visions "what is this I see, a dagger before me?" there are numerous reasons for hallucinations, but because the Elizabethan audience would not have thought of any of these, only that the witches were responsible. There are other examples also, that the Elizabethan audience would consider the witches responsible for, like Macbeth's lack of fear, disturbed behaviour, indifference to life and also invitation to evil spirits. When focusing mainly on the supernatural details of the play, the witches seemed to me as the most powerful element of the play, otherwise, Macbeth seemed like a power-hungry mad murderer, but again, this is only my opinion. The Elizabethan audience would almost definitely consider the witches to be the most powerful element into the play.   

In my opinion, Macbeth is a tragic hero. I see a tragic hero as a character who is admired and loved and followed throughout the play, and is bought down by a flaw in their character followed by fate. Macbeth is a brave hero, highly ranked by...

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