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In this essay I will be looking at two stories one written in the nineteenth century "The signalman" and the other in the twentieth century "Lamb to the Slaughter". I will look at these two stories and compare all the similarities and differences between them, especially in terms of style, content and language. At the beginning of Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter" Dahl sets the scene very well by using a lot of adjectives, this gives the reader a better description of where and when the story is set "the room was warm and clean the curtains drawn, the two table lamps alight "“ hers and the one by the empty chair opposite." "There was a slow smiling air about her" From these quotes we can see that Dahl has set the scene and it is happy and relaxed. At the beginning of "The Signalman" Dickens begins with speech, this makes you want to read on I think, he also uses the narrator to make the story more interesting. These are two very different ways of beginning a story, the readers expectation depends on how they interpret the beginning but I think that Dahl tried to make the reader ask them self who is this woman waiting why is she so happy, but Dickens on the other hand wants the reader to think who is this shouting who is this person telling the story, both beginnings make you want to read on. Dahl creates suspense by building the scene and using a lot of adjectives, this helps build up the suspense very well. Dickens builds suspense by keeping the characters very secretive so the reader is always asking questions so they will read on this I think is a very good way of building suspense. We aren't told what Patrick says to Mary in "Lamb to the Slaughter" because this would be a bit of a predictable story, I think not being told also creates more suspense. Where "Lamb to the slaughter" is set at home adds to the story it is homely but at the same time deadly because anything can happen behind closed doors "the room was warm and clean the curtains drawn, the two table lamps alight "“ hers and the one by the empty chair opposite." "The Signalman" is set in a valley like place on a train track this sets a scary mood because down there anything could happen "his post was in as solitary and dismal a place as ever I saw". Both of the stories were written at different times "Lamb to the Slaughter" in the twentieth century and "The signalman" in the nineteenth century so the styles are very different. "Lamb to the slaughter" is written in the third person and so there is lots of direct speech, but "The Signalman is written in the first person and so there is not really any direct speech. I think direct speech is better and adds more to the story. I think the language used by Dickens, because it is older makes the story more eerie. The stories do have different purposes I think they both have morals but they are very different in the way that I think Dahl wrote his story with a moral but also made the story funny to prove that not all stories have to be serious to have a moral. On the other hand, Dickens wrote his story to warn people. Dickens didn't support new technology like trains and so wanted to warn people about the terrible tragedies that could happen. Dahl, on the other hand, wanted to express that even if you love someone they can still make you angry enough to kill them. I think both of the authors use the same sort of main characters even though the stories were completely different! Both of the characters had been very nervous and unsure about themselves. I think the authors used violence and death to put across their stories because it grabs people's attention and makes them think about what is going on in the stories. I don't think it is very important that the stories are written in the First person or the third person "she might as well have hit him with a steel club" "I was not sure, I told him that I did fully understand" these ways of telling the story are just as good as each other. Dickens wrote about a train killing someone because people were afraid of trains in those days, in 1866 trains were relatively a new invention. Dickens didn't support new technology and trains so in his story he could express his dislike for train and warm people of what they could do. Dahl's massage had more of a moral to it the concerns about the rights and wrongs murder. He used Mary Maloney as an example that murder is a spur of the moment thing and you can even use the anger to hurt someone you love. This shows that both writers suggested in their stories that new technology is not always helpful for example trains, forensic science-finger printing etc. For the time we are in now Dahl is more up to date and writes for a more modern audience and often his work is written for television and radio, he would assume that his readers would know what a typical household would look like because they would have seem many on the television. This is because Dahl's story was written in 1979 when the TV and radon had been invented "she carried it upstairs, holding the thin bone-end of it with both her hands, and she went through the living room she saw him." This quote does not use a lot of description about what the living room and stairs etc looked like because it would be the same as on TV every other suburban household. Dickens wrote his story in a lot more detail because people only had access to books and written words they would need to build a picture of this story in their imaginations, and because this story was a ghost story this would have thrilled and excited them. Televisions were not invented when this story was written in 1866 "there was a fire, a desk for an official book in which he had to make certain entries, a telegraphic instrument with its dial, face, and needles, and a little bell of which he had spoken." This quote uses a lot of description because if you had a TV you would have probably seen an example of a signalman box or a little hut before but because the television hadn't been invented Dickens had to use a lot of description. I have found the difference between these two stories are, "The signalman" is supernatural "Lamb to the Slaughter" is not, both writers have a serious but different purpose for writing their stories, both writers suggest that modern science and technology don't give you all the answers in life, both have central characters who have seem to have "lost their minds", both writers involve violence and death in their stories to draw the readers attention, and the ending to both stories had a twist which in both of the stories I did not expect. "Lamb to the Slaughter" is very funny but at the same time ends on a cliff hanger, but "The signalman" is not really a cliff hanger but leaves you thinking.
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In this essay I will be looking at two stories one written in the nineteenth century "The signalman" and the other in the twentieth century "Lamb to the Slaughter". I will look at these two stories and compare all the similarities and differences between them, especially in terms of style, content and language. At the beginning of Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter" Dahl sets the scene very well by using a lot of adjectives, this gives the reader a better description of where and when the story is set "the room was warm and clean the curtains drawn, the...
but different purpose for writing their stories, both writers suggest that modern science and technology don't give you all the answers in life, both have central characters who have seem to have "lost their minds", both writers involve violence and death in their stories to draw the readers attention, and the ending to both stories had a twist which in both of the stories I did not expect. "Lamb to the Slaughter" is very funny but at the same time ends on a cliff hanger, but "The signalman" is not really a cliff hanger but leaves you thinking.

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Written by H.G. Wells,... Written by H.G. Wells, the story of 'The Time Machine' is regarded by some as one of the greatest science fiction novels of all time. It puts forward many views on time travel, communism and other types of leadership which H.G. Wells felt strongly about, and also against. Herbert George Wells was born on September 21, 1866 in Kent, England. His father was a professional cricketer and shopkeeper, and his mother a former lady's maid. He took lots of short part-time jobs, including as a teaching assistant at a grammar school before going to college to study biology, where he graduated in 1888. He was influenced by a number of other writers at that time, notably Jules Verne, and he wrote his first novel 'The Time Machine', partly in response to the kind of writing Verne produced. The Time Machine was released as a book in 1895. This book was successful and ensured that he would not have to worry about the future. After this H.G. Wells wrote a number of other novels, with the most well known ones being, 'The Island of Dr. Moreau', 'The Invisible Man', and 'The War Between the Worlds'. H.G. Wells is now sometimes named 'the father of modern science fiction'. He died on the 13th August 1946, whilst working on a project that dealt with the dangers of nuclear war. The novel begins with the Time Traveller explaining his theories about the fourth dimension to a group of friends and associates gathered at his home for a weekly dinner. Most of the men present follow his explanations, agree in theory to most of his observations, but quickly become sceptical when the Time Traveller moves from speaking of the nature of time, to the possibility of moving within it. Their disbelief only increases when the Time Traveller offers to supply evidence to support his theories, bringing a small model into the smoking room. Made of metal, ivory and quartz, the machine, as the Time Traveller explains, is a replica of a full sized machine that he has built in his laboratory, and on which he plans to explore time. With his guests watching, he demonstrates the use of the machine, pushing a lever, which causes the model to disappear, into the future, the Time Traveller claims. Most of the men are initially disturbed by the presentation, not quite sure what to think, but most come to believe that the Time Traveller has been playing a trick on them, and easily dismiss his assertion that he plans to explore time within the next week. The following Thursday, another group of men gather at the Time Traveller's house, and find that the host is not at home, but has left a note asking them to start without him. They do so, entertaining themselves with guesses as to why the narrator is not present, when their host enters, dishevelled, dirty, and limping. The Time Traveller returns after washing and changing clothes, to tell the story of his morning, in which he travelled eight days. After dinner, the men gather around him to hear the uninterrupted story. The Time Traveller then tells them that this very morning his machine was finished, and he soon departs into the future. He explains that at first he could only pay attention to the sensation of time travelling, which makes him feel queasy. Once he regains his full sentences, he begins to be able to observe more fully the speed at which he is travelling, as well as the world as time passes. He watches the swiftly changing scenery and then decides to stop to see what the future holds. His stop is sudden, throwing him from the machine into the grass. He finds he Is in the same location as his laboratory, but in the year 802701. He first encounters the Eloi, who approach him soon after his arrival, leading him into a large structure in which they eat and sleep. The Time Traveller takes part in a fruit feast with the Eloi, and explores the area around the structure, observing and making judgements about the nature of the future, which quickly are shown to be incorrect. When he is in the field next, he realizes that his machine has been moved; to where, he cannot fathom. In the next few days, the Time Traveller continues to explore the area, and in the process befriends one particular Eloi named Weena, who he saves from drowning. The Time Traveller, who normally sleeps outside, eventually meets the Morlocks, the other species who inhabit the planet in 802701. He descends down a well to the underground lair where the Morlocks lived, and fought his way back to his time machine using a metal bar and some matches. After a big struggle he finally sends himself away, but mistakenly starts going forwards to time. After millions of years he sees that the moon has disappeared, the earth has stopped rotating, and the sun just bobbed on the horizon. After being attacked by a crab-like creature he went forward again until he saw the earth grow cold and dark, with a frightening eclipse of the sun, and the last remnants of life. Back at home he still tries to prove his journey through time, but still only the narrator really believed him, despite pulling out an unknown species of flower that Weena has given him. The narrator drops by the next day, and as he is just about to leave he remembers that he needs to tell the Time Traveller something, and rushes into his laboratory just in time to see the time machine vanish once more. H.G. Wells, as well as being a well-known English novelist, was also a sociologist, a historian and a scientist, and his style of writing showed this. He wrote like a scientist, with very little emotion, passion or dialogue in his work, and wrote using descriptive writing as if he was describing a practical experiment. Here is an example of this from the narration, "The fire burned brightly, and the soft radiance of the incandescent lights in the lilies of silver caught the bubbles that flashed and passed in our glasses." If the quote was simply, 'The fire burned brightly and the light caught the bubbles that flashed and passed in our glasses,' you would think nothing of it. But because Wells adds the extra scientific adjectives and extra sentences of describing where a simple sentence would have been sufficient, it is an example which makes Wells style of writing stand out plainly and clearly to the readers. For a very unimportant sentence in the book the quote is rather long for just describing the fireplace and the glasses that they were holding, and it seems unnecessary to describe these sorts of objects which are superfluous to the storyline. Well's wrote like this because he thought it would make people take this novel seriously for its political and social context, not merely its creativeness, and the fact that it was written rather like an account would make important politicians and leaders of the time notice his work. He didn't want people to think of his book a fictional novel like other authors at the time Wells obviously had an interest about these sorts of unfamiliar topics at the time, as could be seen from his other novels e.g. The Invisible Man, A Modern Utopia, The Discovery of the Future, The Island of Dr. Moreau, and as these topics were rather audacious for Victorian England, he must have had an extraordinary imagination to have been able to think up such ideas. Could this have been because he was alive during a time as beneficial as the industrial revolution when everything began to change, since something like germs existed then why not another dimension? Wells also used an unidentified third person narrator to do his story telling, he does this because he wants his writing to seem more impersonal and more real, and less of the normal ' I did this' or 'I did that'. It makes it seem like the narrator was with the Time Traveller constantly but of course he was nowhere in the story except at Time Traveller's dinner parties, "The Time Traveller pushed his glass towards the silent man and rang it with his fingernail; at which the Silent Man, who had been staring at his face, started convulsively, and poured him some wine." The Time Traveller himself speaks in direct speech whilst he was either talking to the guests or the Eloi, or thinking to himself, where he used a lot of hypothetical questions, and can spend a whole page describing something like a building to the exact detail, "As the columns of hail grew thinner, I saw the white figure more distinctly. It was very large, for a silver birch-tree touched its shoulder. It was of white marble, in the shape something like a winged sphinx, but the wings, instead of being carried vertically at the sides, were spread so that it seemed to hover"¦" Well's is trying to achieve more interest and make people wonder what could be about to happen with the hypothetical questions and trying to give the readers the picture that he wants to create with the very accurate descriptions, he doesn't want people's imaginations straying too far from what Wells wants them to think. In general, the pseudo-scientific lo lend credence to the reality of the tale together with a dispassionate look at things that happen in the future make the reader focus on what is being said and less on how it is said. This strips away any real involvement with the characters and makes you focus on the story itself and the message Wells is trying to give. Wells was very much a political author. He had definite points he wished to make in his books about the state of not just the nation, but the whole world. The Time Machine was one of his earliest novels and when first written was called a 'scientific romance', rather than Science Fiction. Interestingly enough, a book has been written by Ronald Wright, called 'A Scientific Romance', which is a modern novel detailing what happened when the time machine returned to London. After Well's had witnessed the first world war he proceeded to write more non-fiction books, and undoubtedly told people that war was wrong: "The professional military mind is by necessity an inferior and unimaginative mind; no man of high intellectual quality would willingly imprison his gifts in such calling." from The Outline of History 1920 He went on in that book to give profoundly pessimistic views about mankinds future prospects, as he did in his earlier novel, The Time Machine where he went forward until the world was nothing but a shocking wasteland with barely anything left living. Well's felt that writing so convincingly about it might make people actually think about what they were doing to ruin the planet. "Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe." The Outline of History 1920 Well's passionate concern for society led Well's to join the socialist Fabian Society in London. The Fabian Society was an intellectual movement concerned with the research, discussion, and publication of socialist ideas. The Fabians believed that social reform could be achieved by a new political approach of gradual and patient argument, 'permeating' their ideas into the circles of those with power; they aimed for democratic socialism throughout London. Wells was a member of this group for a few years before he had a falling out with the leaders of the party and left. This certainly tells us a lot about Well's political views and helps you understand more closely the remarks and points he has put in the Time Machine novel. It has also been said that Well's was a supporter of communism which explains why he had these views against capitalism and class division. He has also been recorded to have had some conversations with Lenin and Stalin après the Russian Revolution to further this idea. The main political theme in the Time Machine is that capitalism is dangerous, and harmful to the workers, the connection Is that the Eloi are the lazy upper class supposedly unintelligent people from 19th century London, whilst The Morlocks are the working class. The point Wells tries to make is that for people to be rich and powerful, others have to be suffering for this to happen, an example in modern day society are big sports brands like 'Nike' or 'Adidas', who are multi-million pound companies, but the people who suffer for their wealth are the poor people who make their goods for nothing in third world countries. The second theme in the story was that unlike some contemporary thought, humankind will not continue to develop forever, and there will be a time when backwards steps will be made. Wells changed this idea that the world would continue to improve and science would always get more advanced, with the idea that war could leave two very basic groups of people who were very uncivilised as the only people left on the earth. Wells tried to make people realise that if you all live too easily you will turn in to Eloi and sit and do nothing all day, and that Morlocks are a result of Capitalism gone mad, with the lower class rebelling against the upper classes to result in chaotic circumstances. Of course he made this clear that these changes would not happen immediately, but over long periods of time, and he tried to warn people that if nothing is done about it now then terrible things could happen in the future. In conclusion, the Time Machine by H.G. Wells was a very successful book that has been made into two films and has had numerous attempts to continue the story where Wells left off. It was meant to tell an interesting story but also to put forward views about capitalism and evolution. Even though Wells didn't use the most flowing and spectacular language, and used very scientific and dispassionate language, this didn't halt the success of the book. The main key ideas in the book are, is Capitalism dangerous? Could Communism solve societies' problems? Will all the hard work that has been put in to make the world such an advanced place be wasted in the future? Are complex theories such as Time Travel possible? This book has made scholars and philosophers think about these ideas and many books regarding time travel e.g. Back to the Future, communism and capitalism e.g. Animal Farm, and evolution e.g. Planet of the Apes have been written and made into films because of H.G. Wells and his incredible imagination and view of the world.   

Written by H.G. Wells, the story of 'The Time Machine' is regarded by some as one of the greatest science fiction novels of all time. It puts forward many views on time travel, communism and other types of leadership which H.G. Wells felt strongly about, and also against....

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Dulce Et Decorum est, written... Dulce Et Decorum est, written by Wilfred Owen is a very realistic and brutal poem about the First World War. In his poem he describes the terrible conditions of which many Soldiers had to live, fight and for many soldiers die in. This contrasts greatly with the poem The Soldier written by Rupert Brooke. The Soldier is a very passionate patriotic poem about The First World War. The Soldier was written at the beginning of The First World War, whilst the whole Country was full with enthusiasm and with a patriotic feel. Although Rupert Brooke wrote about the War, he himself never made it there as he died on the journey there. This again may be another reason for his enthusiasm, as he had never experienced the grim and harsh reality of War. Dulce Et Decorum est was written towards the very end of the War, where most of the Country was tired and bitter of fighting. Wilfred Owen, the writer of Dulce Et Decorum est, had fought in the War and had experienced the horrific conditions of War. This is maybe the reason he decided to use the highly ironic title Dulce Et Decorum Est, which is a famous line created by the well-known academic Horace. It means it is sweet and fitting to fight for your country. This has a great contrast to the poems tone and content. The content of both of these poems has great relevance to the First World War. The Soldier has great means of pride, patriotism and religious content: "In hearts at peace, under an English heaven". By concentrating on these elements, Rupert Brooke creates a very different poem to Dulce Et Decorum est. In the first stanza he writes of how if he were to die in war, a corner of a foreign field will be "for ever England." This is very patoratic as it shows the reader, that he has no fear. He follows by decribing England as a beautiful land full of freedom, "Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam." This again is very patoratic as it shows the readers,potential soldiers, that England is something worth fighting for. He starts his next stanza by describing his own psyical and mental fight for his country, "And think, this heart, all evil shed away." This shows how he is not jut fighting for his Country he is also fighting a mental battle within himself. He follows by describing himself as a "pulse in the eternal mind." Which shows he is well aware he is only a very small piece of a large plan.It could also mean he is in pulse with God and that he believes God is backing them.This gives the reader great confidence as it shows that if God is backing them they must be in the right and therefore they will win.He then finishes the poem by using strong passionate personification to describe England, "Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day."This is another form of patronism as it gives the reader great pride for England. In Wilfred Owen's poem his point of view on the War is very different. He writes about treacherous events vividly which causes very clear images: "Gas! Gas"¦yelling out and stumbling". This vivid explanation causes a very clear disturbing picture, which makes the reader think of those who fought for their Country and those who died doing it. This therefore sends the reader a very different view of war. He starts Dulce Et Decorum est by describing the shocking state of which all soldiers were in and the horrific condition which they lived and fought in, "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge." He then describes a vivid gas attack by using strong description and imagary, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! "“ An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling, And flound"ring like a man in fire or lime." This is very penetrating as the strong imagary make you imagine the shocking conditions and the sudden attack. This therefore makes the prospect of the war a reality. His last stanza starts by describing the attack effect of the gas attack, "His hanging face, like a devil"s sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs." This is very frightening for the reader as you can vividly imagine it. It would also be frightening if you had family or friends in the war as it is very easy to imagine the horrific death happening to one of them. In the final stanza, Owen enforces that, should readers see what he has seen, the government would cease to send young men to war, all the while instilling visions of glory in their heads. No longer would they tell them the old lie, "Dulce Et Decorum est." The language used in The Soldier has many different descriptive techniques. Rupert Brooke decides to use personification to describe England: "Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day". This effect echances the certain theme of patronism around the poem, this is because the reader thinks of England as a woman and therefore something worth fighting for. He also uses a few examples of alliteration which is very promanent in old English poems. Alliterations has a gratifying effect on the sound, which gives a reinforcement to stresses, and can also serve as a subtle connection or emphasis of key words in a line, "And laughter, learnt of friends; and geltleness". Dulce et Decorum est also includes very clever and effective descriptive words which creates imminant images. He uses imagery in his poem so he is albe to create a picture in the readers mind which is needed to feel the full force of the poem "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge." He also uses repetition, which is very effective and therefore creates a certain feel for the poem, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!" The tone of The Soldier is very different to the one of Dulce et Decorum as it has very different content. The Soldier has a very uplifting tone this is acheived by using patroatic and romantic content. It is also very optimistic as it ideailized England, this is very unrealistic. On the other hand the tone of Dulce et decorum est is very realistic as is it shows the true, depressing facts of war. Both of the poems impact the reader greatly as they are both written about the same topic,War.The Soldiers impacts the reader by showing a patoratic romantic view of the war. This impacts the reader as it shows great courage and the strong proud atmosphere which was drilled into everyone.On the other hand Dulce Et Decorum Est was written towards the very end of the War and impacts the reader by describing the horrific death of a soldier after being attacked by a gas bomb.This impacts the reader greatly as Wilfred Owen uses many strong language tecniques to create a vivid image. Although both poems are very much about World War One, they are both very different. The Soldier was written during the beggining of the war when the whole country was full with patronism and belief. This is the reason for its upbeat tone and optimism. It is full with religious and patroatic content which is created using strong personiication and descriptions.Dulce Et Decorum est was written towards the end of the War,this is the reason for its very harsh realistic view on the war. Wilfred Owen writes about the shocking conditions and how a fellow soldier died whilst he stood their helpless. He uses strong imagary to create vivid images in the readers mind.   

Dulce Et Decorum est, written by Wilfred Owen is a very realistic and brutal poem about the First World War. In his poem he describes the terrible conditions of which many Soldiers had to live, fight and for many soldiers die in. This contrasts greatly with the poem The...

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