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Topic: Hunting with Dogs Running for your life, but yet knowing deep inside you that you're going to be ripped limb from limb. The last thing you hear is your screams for help and the sound of cheering by a group of humans. The last thing you see is your killer's face covered in your blood. Some people call this morally wrong act of cruelty a 'sport'. It is turning into a more common 'sport' around the country and it needs to stop"¦not for the distant future, but NOW! Reports and tests show that 96.9% of animals hunted and then killed by dogs die a slow painful death due to their atrocious injuries. The other 3.1% of animals killed by dogs die from exhaustion and die more quickly from its injuries. Either way the hunted animal dies from the effects of being hunted. Surely this has to stop? "Why" do you say? Well 'why' do hunting packs only hunt foxes, deer's, hares and minks? I'll tell you why, its because these animals don't defend themselves against the hounds. They aren't strong enough to attack back. They just run, run as far as they can go, until the hounds catch up and kill them. Easy targets. More animals hunted in one go. Quick and 'effective' games. If this isn't cruelty to animals, then I don't know and can't see, what is! RSPCA, CPHA and LACS are the most highly praised organisations that try to prevent these hunting games from carrying on. They try to their highest ability to try and ban hunting with dogs, but sadly the government and the House of Lords are too strong and believe this morally wrong blood sport is perfectly 'normal'. They say the sport can go ahead because it keeps control over the numbers of Foxes, Deer's, Hares and Minks. However, studies show that the number of those animals doesn't need controlling and could decrease at alarming rates in the near future. If they thought this sport helps keep control and that it's the only way, well they're wrong! Scientists show that the only rightful way to keep control over the numbers of animals is not to hunt them with dogs but to shoot them with a type of tranquilliser which would cause the animal to die a quiet, non painful death. This is kind to the animal without the outrage of a bloodthirsty dog ripping them limb from limb. Are the government and the House of Lords being stubborn? Scared to face up to the situation and the blood sports team members? Among the supporters of hunting there is a fear that if it is banned there will be a severe shortage of jobs in rural areas. However I feel that this argument does not stand up in today's modern world with its very low overall unemployment rates. In addition to this the rapid increase in opportunities for working at home coupled with the advances in computer technology and the associated training courses available make it easier to replace any lost jobs. "Hunting is natural. Humans have been hunting since the moment we were created, so why stop now?" says Mr Robert Burns, a farmer from Somerset. Everybody aggress initially we were barbaric in nature but surely we're suppose to have progressively become more civilised. Or have we? Picture the scene: You're looking for food for your loved one and your 4 children. You hear a noise, which you've heard before, but you carry on hunting for food for your family. Then suddenly out of the bushes jump 15 hounds, thirsty for blood, your blood. You run until you can run no more; you collapse. Fighting for your breath, you try to get up but before you know it you're being ripped apart. You're dead. Your body is covered in blood and taken away by a human on a horse. Your skin to make clothes. Your flesh to be eaten by your killers. Your bones crushed to mark various items. Your family is left to starve. Your family is dead. But worse the, perpetrators revel in it. The question we need to ask is, who are the real animals, the Foxes, Deer's, Hares and Minks, or US? Let us make positive steps to change this situation by getting the law changed to ban hunting with dogs.
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Topic: Hunting with Dogs Running for your life, but yet knowing deep inside you that you're going to be ripped limb from limb. The last thing you hear is your screams for help and the sound of cheering by a group of humans. The last thing you see is your killer's face covered in your blood. Some people call this morally wrong act of cruelty a 'sport'. It is turning into a more common 'sport' around the country and it needs to stop…not for the distant future, but NOW! Reports and tests show that 96.9% of animals hunted...
know it you're being ripped apart. You're dead. Your body is covered in blood and taken away by a human on a horse. Your skin to make clothes. Your flesh to be eaten by your killers. Your bones crushed to mark various items. Your family is left to starve. Your family is dead. But worse the, perpetrators revel in it.

The question we need to ask is, who are the real animals, the Foxes, Deer's, Hares and Minks, or US? Let us make positive steps to change this situation by getting the law changed to ban hunting with dogs.

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William Shakespeare's 'The Tempest,'... William Shakespeare's 'The Tempest,' was first performed in 1611 and was the last play that Shakespeare wrote. The main character, Prospero is thought to be a representation of Shakespeare as he controls all of the characters in the play just as Shakespeare controls the characters in his scripts also at the end of the play, Prospero asks the audiences' permission to leave the stage in the epilogue, this could be seen as Shakespeare announcing his retirement: "Let your indulgence set me free." The play suggests many differences between the primitive Caliban and the civilised Prospero. We see these on a number of occasions throughout the play as the two, very different personalities clash. Caliban is a portrayed as a primitive man, He acts on instinct and his basic urges to eat, sleep and reproduce. We see this when we learn why Prospero keeps Caliban as a slave. The audience would empaphise with Caliban, as he is very innocent although bestial. Whereas Caliban has no urge or desire for material possession or power, Prospero does. Prospero ideally sums up the civilised as he is educated and knows right from wrong. Prospero has lived in a world governed by laws whereas Caliban has only ever known his island, where there are no rules. Calibans first appearance on stage is in Act 1 Scene 2. As, he approaches Prospero; he immediately curses him using an image taken from nature. This shows the audience of the hate between Prospero and Caliban. We know this because Prospero previously calls Caliban a 'tortoise,' so he is referring him to an animal, and the curses that Caliban uses: "A south-west blow on ye, And blister you all o'er." For Elizabethan times, the curses that Caliban directs to Prospero would be very severe and insulting. All of the curses are images taken from nature as Caliban refers to the wind, wildlife and dew on the ground. These images show that Caliban lives in harmony with nature and the island, and loves everything about wildlife: "As wicked dew"¦ "¦Ravens feather." Prospero responds to Caliban by punishing him by threatening to order his spirits to hurt him in his sleep. Prospero treats Caliban, as a worthless creature that he feels should have no liberties, for what he tried to do to his beautiful Miranda. Even before this event though, Prospero didn't treat Caliban as equal, although he taught him about the world, he kept him as a pet. Now Caliban is forced to be a slave to Prospero who dismisses all curses Caliban and returns his own dehumanising insults: "Hag-seed, hence"¦ Abhorred slave" Caliban has lived on the island all of his life as he was born there. His mother, Sycorax, who was a wickedly evil witch used to rule over the island but has since passed away. Caliban is also said to be the son of the Devil. This is why Caliban has a disfigured appearance and has no idea of rules and boundaries. After Sycorax died had died, Caliban had become the ruler of the island, as there was just him and the spirits living there in harmony. When Prospero arrived on the island he used his magic to demand power and with this usurped the position of leader of the island from Caliban, much to the anger of the native. At first, Prospero taught Caliban language and how to understand life. Caliban was treated as if he was a pet: " And teach me how to name the bigger light." As Miranda grew up there were no real clashes between Caliban and Prospero until Miranda reached her early teens. Caliban's primitive, instinctive urges led him to attempting to rape Miranda. Prospero was enraged by this and ever since has forced Caliban into being a slave using the spirits to taunt him if he disobeys. Caliban is forced to live in a dark cave and has to collect food and wood for Prospero and his daughter. Caliban would feel very bitter about his and that he has lost his island: "This islands' mine by Sycorax my mother." Prospero views himself as the beautiful white European and as Caliban is indigenous, he is looked upon by Prospero as ugly and different as he is not the same as Prospero's ideal. A reason for this is colonial arrogance. During the time this play was performed many British explorers were venturing to new shores around the world and setting up new colonies using the natives as labour or use them to help themselves. Prospero is just like these explorers who tries to utilise the skills of the indigenous people. I would cast Caliban as having dark tanned skin being played by a beautiful attractive man, just to emphasise the prejudice of Prospero: "Freckled whelk"¦ "¦Filth as thou art" Caliban would wear gowns made of natural materials. E.g leaves bark. He would also wear a shawl of what once was Prospero's, to show the audience that Prospero once respected him: "Thou strok'st me, and made Much of me." When Caliban has a soliloquy he would speak clearly and gently, to show his sensitive side but in the presence of Prospero his anger would engulf him and he would growl and snarl. Hen would walk with a slight limp, a sign of when the spirits hurt him, and crouched, as his cave is very small and cramped: " Caliban snarling Caliban cowering" Caliban would always look innocent to gain sympathy from the audience. After the Tempest, the crew of the ship became washed up on the shore of the island in a number of small groups. Stephano and Trinculo believe that they could make some money out of the being back in Europe: "Were I in England now As I once was And had this fish painted: not a holiday Fool there but give a piece of silver." Shakespeare is poking fun at the Elizabethan desire for spectacle and hard-heartedness. Caliban would be in awe of the two strangers especially Stephano as Caliban views him as his new leader and as his God, who has been sent from heaven "Hast thou not dropp'd from heaven?" Caliban would throw himself at the feet of Stephano in awe as if he is a God, and Caliban a forever-loyal servant. This shows how gullible he is and Shakespeare implies how Elizabethans believed in myths and legends. Caliban would circle Stephano and distance himself from Trinculo. He would hang on Stephano's every drunken word and spit at the ground where Trinculo has stood. Trinculo feels ashamed that he was scared of the savage and now he is jealous of Caliban that Stephano is paying more attention to Caliban. Stephano feels very special and important when Caliban is being very sycophantic towards him: "I'll kiss thy foot." Caliban uses imagery connecting them to the heavens as he refers to Stephano as a 'brave God,' or deity and he views the alcohol as if it has been sent from the heavens: "celestial liquor." Caliban offers his only gift to Stephano in showing him the island. He offers himself to Stephano and curses Prospero: " A plague upon the tyrant that I serve." The word 'tyrant,' implies that Prospero exercises power in a harsh, cruel manner. Caliban sings and rejoices at the thought of no longer having to be a servant to Prospero. We know that Caliban loves the island because of his knowledge of the island and the imagery of nature that he uses. We can see that he is grateful that can finally show his love for his home. In Act 3 Scene 2 Caliban plots with Stephano and Trinculo to usurp Prospero from power and leadership of the island. As this takes place though, Ariel, Prospero's spirit servant plays a trick on the scheming group. I would stage this scene as the group on one side of the stage in a huddle with Trinculo nonchalantly leaning up against a tree mimicking Caliban's comments in a jealous way. On the other side of the stage there would be a large rock. Ariel would hide behind this and when he would speak he would peek his head over the top so that the audience realise that it is Ariel. Ariel would call Caliban a liar, hide behind his rock and laugh with the audience at the unfolding events. This would be a joke between Ariel and the audience but the other three wouldn't have any idea what is going on. This is effective use of dramatic irony. We learn even more of the hatred of Prospero by Caliban in this scene. Caliban calls Prospero a tyrant and claims that he cheated the island from him. Caliban describes Prospero to Stephano and Trinculo as an evil sorcerer and he intends to kill Prospero and help Stephano to claim the island. I would stage Caliban as when he talks about Prospero to talk with bitter anguish in his voice and act very aggressively and perhaps he could punch a tree as he describes the ways that they could kill Prospero in his sleep: "Batter his skull, or paunch Him with a stake, or cut, His wezand with thy knife." These acts of violence emphasise the deep hatred that Caliban has for Prospero, he even believes that the spirits dislike him. Saying this could help get the audience on Calinban's side by trying to portray Prospero as a bad person. We learn about Caliban's personality in this scene as the audience are shown of his intelligence when he tells the others of the best time and way to kill Prospero, by seizing his magic books. Caliban thinks Prospero is nothing without his magic and would stand no chance against the three men. He detests how Prospero can enchant the spirits into serving him through blackmail and false hope in the case of Prospero telling Ariel he would be free from duties. Towards the end of the scene, Ariel plays a tune on his tabor and pipe. This scares Stephano and Trinculo as they can hear music that is played by nobody. Caliban reassures the men that it is normal on the island to hear delightful music and gives a speech about it using imagery of soft sleep and dreaming along with beautiful instruments and light clouds to show his sensitive side and how he lives in harmony with the island as he often enjoys the delicate sounds of the spirits. The speech shows that the island is a very beautiful, fascinating place that is full of magical goings-on. Even with Prospero ruling over the island. In conclusion, I feel that Caliban has been the most interesting character in the play through the way Shakespeare has used Caliban's language use and innocence to portray a good indication of what a 'tamed,' savage being would be. I admire Caliban as he has not lost faith in his beautiful island and he will fight for what he believes in/against, even when it involves being subjected to physical pain. He even shows how sensitive and intelligent he can be even if he is usually aggressive and can sometimes act bestial: " I cried to dream again." I think that Prospero was wrong to treat Caliban as a slave and although Caliban tried to rape Miranda, Prospero treats him badly and unfairly, as Caliban knew no better than to rely on his basic, primitive urges. I agree that Caliban should have been punished so that he can learn what is right and wrong, but on not such a severe scale. Prospero views him as a Devil who cannot be changed, but when Prospero arrived on the island he must have thought differently because he taught him the ways of life: "A devil, a born devil." Caliban realises that he has chosen to worship the wrong person when Stephano is only interested in possessions where Caliban is unmaterialistic and he does not want to hurt anyone or cause suffering, he just wants his island. 'The Tempest,' raises the issue of colonial arrogance, which is relevant today, just as it was in Elizabethan times. Still, today, there are many 'Prospero's,' who visit different cultures and believe the natives are different and therefore do not give them or their culture a chance. We learn in the end that the prejudiced people in the world will get what they deserve as in this case, the audience sees Prospero as quite a manipulative figure.   

William Shakespeare's 'The Tempest,' was first performed in 1611 and was the last play that Shakespeare wrote. The main character, Prospero is thought to be a representation of Shakespeare as he controls all of the characters in the play just as Shakespeare controls the characters in his scripts...

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Arthur Miller was born in 1915...Arthur Miller was born in 1915 in New York. He was a playwright whose work discussed significant social issues, giving the reader a deep insight into his characters' feelings. He died on February 11th 2005. In 'A View From The Bridge', Eddie Carbone is a middle-aged Sicilian-American longshoreman who lives with his wife Beatrice and his 18 year old niece Catherine. They live in a two bedroom apartment in a slum area. They don't have very much money and Eddie speaks non-standard English. Early in the book the reader gets the impression that Eddie is a hard-working man who is trying to earn enough money to provide for his wife and niece. Although Catherine is the 18 year old niece of Eddie, at the beginning of the story the reader gets the feeling that Catherine is treated as Eddie's little girl. Catherine was born in America with a slight Sicilian-American accent. She wants to leave school having been chosen out of many girls to be a stenographer for a plumbing company. Catherine is put in a difficult situation by Eddie because some of his actions suggest he may be sexually attracted to her, but Catherine falls in love with illegal immigrant Rodolpho. There are many dramatic mini scenes in Act 1. In one of them Rodolpho sings in front of everyone. This causes tension between Eddie, Rodolpho, Catherine, Beatrice and Marco. Eddie says "“'He's like a chorus girl or sump'm'. Eddie is saying that Rodolpho isn't normal and that he might be homosexual. This is very insulting and Eddie showing his dislike for Rodolpho even though he has only just met him. Eddie's rudeness towards Rodolpho makes Catherine annoyed and Miller writes "“ Embarrassed now, angered, Catherine goes into the bedroom... she gives Eddie a cold look, restrained only by strangers. The audience can see from Catherine's face and body language that she isn't very happy with Eddie and the tension this creates. The mini-scene continues with further tension from a disagreement between Eddie and Beatrice as they argue about Catherine. Eddie also says "“ 'You mean it's all right with you? That's gonna be her husband?' He is asking Beatrice whether she would be happy if Rodolpho married Catherine because Eddie obviously doesn't like him. This argument makes Beatrice say "“'When am I gonna be a wife again'. Eddie and Beatrice are going through a hard time and Beatrice feels that Eddie isn't treating her like he is supposed to. Eddie's reaction to Beatrice's comments is "“'I can't talk about it'. Eddie is becoming tense by Beatrice pestering him and doesn't know how to respond to her questions. The row results in Eddie not bothering to look at or touch Beatrice. The reader can see this from Miller's stage directions where he puts "“she tries to turn him to her"¦he keeps his head turned away. Miller, from this stage direction, makes the reader appreciate that Eddie is annoyed. Miller also writes "“Eddie"¦ his face puffed with trouble, and the room dies. Eddie is being very negative and this is frustrating other characters. Miller creates tension from his dialogue and from his stage directions as facial expressions they describe the characters body language. In act two Eddie's presence on stage has a profound effect on the other characters. Miller has presented Eddie in this way through his choice of dialogue and specific stage directions. The tension between Eddie and the other characters grows after he sees Rodolpho emerge from Catherine's room with Catherine. Miller states "“ Eddie sees him and his arm jerks slightly in shock. He puts this to illustrate to the reader that Eddie is obviously quite surprised and angry. At the time Eddie is a bit drunk and he throws himself at Catherine and kisses her on the lips. Miller writes "“ he reaches out suddenly, draws her to him, and as she strives to free herself he kisses her on the mouth. This action could be as a result of Eddie having inappropriate feelings for her or it may be a last ditch effort to stop Catherine from leaving because he can't accept that she isn't his little girl anymore. Rodolpho shouts at him "“ 'Stop that! Have respect for her!' Rodolpho eventually manages to pull Eddie off her and Eddie turns round to face Rodolpho. Rodolpho then says "“ 'She'll be my wife. That is what I want my wife. My wife!' The use of the exclamation marks shows the passion in Rodolpho's voice and contributes to creating dramatic tension. This infuriates Eddie even more and he teases Rodolpho who tries to attack Eddie, but Eddie lunges towards Rodolpho and kisses him on the lips. Miller says "“ Rodolpho flies at him in attack. Eddie pins his arms, laughing, and suddenly kisses him. A motive for kissing Rodolpho could be an attempt to prove to Catherine that Rodolpho is homosexual. The above stage directions in this mini scene are designed to achieve visual tension among the characters describing physical contact and body language especially that of Eddie so that the audience can fully appreciate the growing nature of his relationships with Catherine and Rodolpho. Events in act two build up to the tragic climax. In this mini scene Eddie reports Rodolpho and Marco to the Immigration Bureau who take them away and it is widely believed that Eddie was the person that reported them. When Catherine tells Eddie that she and Rodolpho are getting married Eddie tries to make her rethink her decision. He pleads "“ 'Katie, wait a minute'. But Catherine responds with "“ 'No, I made up my mind.' Even now, after everything that has happened before, Eddie doesn't want Catherine to leave. Even though Eddie is against the marriage he tries to get Marco and Rodolpho out of the house before the Immigration Bureau arrive. He becomes worried and anxious. He says nervously "“ 'Catherine! What're you, got no brains? You put them up there with two other submarines?' Miller also states "“ In a driving fright and anger, to describe the way Eddie was acting. Catherine moved Marco and Rodolpho to an apartment upstairs where Eddie knew the Immigration Bureau could find them. Eddies newly found care for Rodolpho and Marco meant that when the Immigration Bureau knocked on the door they all knew it was Eddie who had reported them. Miller writes "“ 'A knock on the door. His head swerves. They all stand motionless.' Eddie does what he can to make Marco and Rodolpho avoid being caught by the Immigration Bureau but it was too little too late. Miller also puts "“'Catherine stands motionless, uncomprehending"¦she stands a moment staring at him in realized horror.' This stage direction visualises for the reader the dramatic tension, it shows that Catherine knew what Eddie had done and that she was shocked and surprised that even Eddie would report them after he had constantly told her how it was against the Sicilian Code of Honour. In this mini scene Miller skilfully via his stage directions used the lack of motion to create tension. Eddies actions in act two are against everything that he was saying in act one and his jealousy makes him commit an unforgivable crime against his family and the Sicilian community. In act one he was telling Catherine how it is against the Sicilian Code of Honour to report an illegal immigrant under any circumstances. When Beatrice was describing a boy that once reported his uncle she said "“ 'He had five brothers and the old father"¦ and they pulled him down the stairs "“ three flights his head was bouncing like a coconut.' At the time this play was set, late 1940s, it wasn't acceptable to be homosexual and in act one Eddie makes it sound like being homosexual was almost as bad as breaking the Sicilian Code of Honour. Yet in act two he kisses Rodolpho. I think 'A View From The Bridge' is a very interesting book as it raises social issues that are still relevant today and it shows the difficult decisions a Sicilian American, such as Eddie, had to make in the late 1940s.   

Arthur Miller was born in 1915 in New York. He was a playwright whose work discussed significant social issues, giving the reader a deep insight into his characters' feelings. He died on February 11th 2005. In 'A View From The Bridge', Eddie Carbone is a middle-aged Sicilian-American longshoreman who lives...

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