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This essay will focus on an examination of the differences between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. In this essay, I shall use quotes and examples from both tabloid and broadsheet newspapers to illustrate my points. Firstly, I shall describe the physical appearances in each type of newspaper. In a typical tabloid newspaper, for example The Mirror, the banner has a plain and stenciled looking typeface, which is designed to attract the consumers attention into purchasing it, whereas in a typical broadsheet in this instant, The Times the banner has a very intricate design which gives it a distinguished look, possibly designed for the attention of the more educated and professional reader. I shall now move on to explain the use of alliteration and large and small titles to illustrate articles in tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. A typical tabloid newspaper, in this case The Mirror, uses alliteration to create dramatic and sensational titles which are again designed to persuade the reader into reading more on the article. Quote: "CRICKET: CRICKET IN CRISIS"¦" This tells us that The Mirror is attempting to attract the reader's attention by having a dramatic title to illustrate its cricket article; communicating to the reader that cricket as a whole is facing a dilemma, when in actual fact the article relates to the England Cricket Team refusing to play in Zimbabwe due to Robert Mugabe's regime. The title then reads on: "NASSER DEMANDS TO BE SAVED FROM ZIMBABWE HELL"¦" The title displays informal language, as if to communicate with the less educated reader. The Mirror also refers to Nasser Hussain the England Cricket Team captain by his first name, whereas typical broadsheet newspapers would refer to people involved in their articles by their last names in order to sound less informal and more professional; an aspect of broadsheet newspapers which appeals to the more educated reading audience. Quote: "Hussain's men plead for Zimbabwe boycott" This title, taken from The Times a broadsheet newspaper begins with a capital letter and follows with lower case letters, like a normal sentence does. It also contains more sophisticated words, like 'plead' and 'boycott'. Overall the cricket article title in The Times seems less eager to attract the reader's attention, and more keen on informing the reader of the facts behind the issue, unlike The Mirror, which seems to prefer attracting the reader's attention by using writing techniques such as whole sentences in capital letters and alliteration. I shall now compare the use of language in The Mirror and The Times. In The Mirror's cricket article, the writer of the article itself is referred to as: "Oliver Holt Chief Sports Writer", whereas the writer of The Times' cricket article is referred to more formally as: "Owen Slot, Chief Sports Reporter". The opening paragraph of The Mirror's cricket article is very informal, and it is written almost as if the writer wants to be the reader's friend. Quote: "JUST when we thought the mess couldn't get any messier, Nasser Hussain and his wandering band of white-feather wavers came along and fouled it up some more" This contrasts with the more professional and factual approach of the first paragraph in The Times' cricket article. Quote: "THE England cricket team yesterday made an urgent request for their controversial opening World Cup match on February 13 to be relocated from Zimbabwe to South Africa"¦" These paragraphs show that The Mirror is biased by taking the side of the common cricket fan, annoyed at the fact that the England Cricket Team will not go to Zimbabwe, while The Times shows no signs of being biased and continues to read in a professional manner despite whatever their personal beliefs may be. By the ninth paragraph of the cricket article, The Mirror then begins to refer to different issues that are irrelevant to the article, in an attempt to justify the situation with the England Cricket Team. Quote: "The sadness is they don't understand the precedent they have set. What happens now when British jets bomb Iraq a few weeks down the line? What happens when our military kills thousands of innocent civilians?" This suggests that The Mirror is clearly stating it's personal opinion, which some readers prefer as they can relate to them. However, this is not the case with The Times, as they keep to the subject of the article without including any other issues throughout. Quote: "It also suggests that the ECB [England and Wales Cricket Board] has failed to represent the view of the players because the players and their employers now occupy significantly differing positions." This suggests that The Times is again taking the more professional and educated approach to portraying their articles, which appeals to the more professional and educated reader. I shall now go on to explain the differences between the editorials in each of the newspapers. Editorials are the specific area in newspapers where the newspaper itself states its own views and opinions on certain news and other issues. The editorial is commonly found in the centre pages of most newspapers. In this instance I shall compare The Sun's editorial with that of The Times' editorial through their writing techniques and use of language. The Sun's editorial, which in this case is referring to the issues with the weather affecting major roads around London, starts off with an alliterated two word sentence to summarise their opinion. Quote: "White Wash". The Times however, starts off it's editorial with a less casual style of writing. Quote: "A winter's tale: Britain muddles on towards snowbound mediocrity" This shows that The Times is carrying on it's professional stance, even when giving it's own personal opinion, as The Sun being a typical tabloid newspaper carries on it's casual and friendly genre. The Sun continues this style by including puns in it's editorial to create a friendlier atmosphere for the reader. Quote: "Yes, they're up grit creek again.""¦"We are a Third World joke - run by snow good jobsworths." The Times uses different and perhaps more sophisticated writing techniques to The Sun, one such technique being the oxymoron. Quote: "British weather is predictably unpredictable". This tells us that The Times is probably using this technique to distinguish itself more from the less sophisticated tabloid newspaper. The Sun lays out it's editorial in short, summarised paragraphs, possibly to make it easier for the reader to comprehend. Quote: "The cost to the country is put at £150million" Then written underneath in a separate paragraph: "Britain is the laughing stock of the world". The Times however, keeps it's editorial's layout in neat and normal sized paragraphs, in it's continuing professional manner. Altogether, I can conclude that The Times a typical broadsheet newspaper is designed for more educated and sophisticated readers, with it's advanced writing techniques and professional layout, whereas The Sun and The Mirror typical tabloid newspapers contrast with broadsheet newspapers, and are set out for the less well educated and more casual reader, with it's friendly use of language and openly-stated opinions.
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This essay will focus on an examination of the differences between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. In this essay, I shall use quotes and examples from both tabloid and broadsheet newspapers to illustrate my points. Firstly, I shall describe the physical appearances in each type of newspaper. In a typical tabloid newspaper, for example The Mirror, the banner has a plain and stenciled looking typeface, which is designed to attract the consumers attention into purchasing it, whereas in a typical broadsheet in this instant, The Times the banner has a very intricate design which gives it a distinguished look,...
at £150million" Then written underneath in a separate paragraph: "Britain is the laughing stock of the world".

The Times however, keeps it's editorial's layout in neat and normal sized paragraphs, in it's continuing professional manner.

Altogether, I can conclude that The Times a typical broadsheet newspaper is designed for more educated and sophisticated readers, with it's advanced writing techniques and professional layout, whereas The Sun and The Mirror typical tabloid newspapers contrast with broadsheet newspapers, and are set out for the less well educated and more casual reader, with it's friendly use of language and openly-stated opinions.

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Introduction Terminator 2... Introduction Terminator 2 "“ Judgement Day is the sequel to the 1984 film "The Terminator" Analysis The film starts with a black screen, the music is very dramatic and menacing, it tells the viewer that something sinister is going to take place. The first credit appears, it is written in a futuristic font, a hint to the science fiction genre of the film. The scene starts with an image of an establishing- shot of a high street. It is bright summer day in Los Angeles and we can see lots of cars moving on a busy road, we move to a slow- motion shot of children playing on swings, they give the sense of innocence along with the happy feel of the sunny weather, to contrast with the daunting music. The colour starts to fade, as an apocalyptic burning light dominates the screen until the screen is completely white. The words "Los Angeles 2029 A.D." fade in as we go from joyful images of children to ones of death and destruction, the music has stopped and all that can be heard is the wind and a creaking sound, making the viewer cringe, the camera pans over more and more images of death, a wrecked car containing a skeleton driver, skulls scattered underneath a dark and gloomy sky, questions are running through the viewers mind, how and why has this happened? The playground where young children where playing in the previous scene is now in ruins, as we see the skulls of children on the burnt ground next to charred swings and toys, the viewer feels saddened, shocked and sympathetic in the scary silence, which only makes it more intense as the camera stops on the image of a small skull, a depressing voice of a woman is heard "Three billion human lives ended on August 29, 1997. The survivors of the nuclear fire called the war Judgment Day. They lived only to face a new nightmare, a war against the machines..." Suddenly a metallic foot of a robotic figure crushes the small skull along with a bone crushing sound as it shatters to pieces, this is extremely unexpected so the viewer immediately jumps. The camera pans up to reveal the evil looking chrome figure, it is skeleton like with human features, supporting a massing gun. The brutal robot scans the landscape, showing the machine has piecing red, deep set eyes. Bombs explode whilst laser beams shoot across the sky, the camera zooms in of the track of a massive tank representing tanks that have been used in many real life wars shooting lasers whilst crushing masses more skulls, representing the massacre and mass destruction of this mechanical force, that has no mercy or respect for the dead, and which can only be described as wicked. The evil has spread, not only by land, but flying aircraft shoots from the sky. There are close ups of one of the tanks arms shooting lasers, to give a direct impact, as with a shot of a robot shooting straight at the viewer. The camera uses long shots to show the extent of the damage. Soldiers are being blasted to death, a vehicle full of men blown up, all by the terrifying and relentless machine, one of many that seem to invincible, whilst brave and courageous soldiers attempt to battle them, but failing, with bullets simply pinging of their strong armour. The camera shows low angle images, making the machines to even more powerful. The music is a grinding industrial sound, there is a full-scale conflict happening and the human army are losing. One aircraft is destroyed, showing a glimpse of hope for the human defence. One human fighter is seen walking into a tunnel as the voice heard earlier starts speaking again, full of soldiers, as the camera follows behind him, each soldier salutes him, so we know that he plays and important role, the voice explains "The computer which controlled the machines, Skynet, sent two terminators back through time. Their mission: to destroy the leader of the human Resistance"¦ John Conner-" the man walks out of the tunnel with pride and looks through a pair of binoculars heroically "my son". This emphasises the importance of this one man, a true leader. The voice continues to explain the background information to the viewer "The first terminator was programmed to strike at me, in the year 1984...before John was born. It failed. The second was sent to strike at John himself, when he was still a child. As before, the Resistance was able to send a lone warrior. A protector for John. It was just a question of which one of them would reach him first." Whilst the voice is speaking the camera pans in on the strong and tough face of John Conner, until flames dominate the image, the title of the film and the credits are shown with heroic music playing, while the screen burns violently. We see images of the battlefield in flames, including the children's playground, swings still swinging, burning until the face of one of the robots are shown, the shiny evil human skull like looking face, zooming in on the piecing red dot eyes staring at the viewer. The scene suddenly comes to an end. Conclusion In conclusion, I think that the film has an excellent opening, packed with action and special effects making it grab the viewer using music to express emotions- scary, destructive and heroic that only emphasises the visual dynamite, within the footage. It starts by putting questions in the viewers mind, how and why did this happen? It reveals the answers using a battle scene that is extremely shocking and directed at the viewer. The idea of the human force being destroyed by a humanoid, robotic army is terrifying, and the use of the voice of a mother talking about the one hope the human beings have- her son. The burning flames make the viewer feel as if they are inside a furnace, and my favourite shot is one of the children's playground on fire, just because there is nothing more disturbing when the words violence and destruction are mixed with children. The only improvements that in my opinion could be made, are that the humans could be shown fighting closer to the robots, so the viewer could connect more, and shots through the of the humans eyes would make it feel more real for the viewer.   

Introduction Terminator 2 – Judgement Day is the sequel to the 1984 film "The Terminator" Analysis The film starts with a black screen, the music is very dramatic and menacing, it tells the viewer that something sinister is going to take place. The first credit...

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n what ways is advertising seeking...n what ways is advertising seeking to affect young people and to what extent could it be construed as harmful? Eye-catching colours, phrases and people attract a consumer to look at an advert, and to absorb the information in them. These tricks of the trade have been used and abused for years and will go on to do so forever, however, the point I am going to raise is how much the youth have been drawn into this potentially vicious web of advertisements. Targeting the young has never been so easy for advertising companies, as they are very impressionable. If an official advert said a product was the best or would make you feel or look a certain way, then their outlook, likely to be less pessimistic than an adult, would be to believe this and be influenced. The youth are also the generation that will be the lasting impact on advertising/marketing companies, so in a way, if you catch them young they will be an investment. Starting at the very bottom, in adverts for fast food or toys, for example the Mc Donald's Happy Meal- a TV commercial may contain a joke or two appropriate for all ages, even if it would go over most 5 year olds' heads. It would also use tricks to interest the child, such as bright colours, cartoons or captions. Once the child expresses interest and the adult laughs at the joke; Mc Donald's have sold that family a happy meal, and a possibility of many more visits. Although this appears totally harmless, it seems slightly worrying that if children as young as 4 or 5 can be influenced into getting their parents to spend money in fast food restaurants, then no wonder 12 year olds are becoming influenced into buying alcohol. In looking at old adverts, and comparing them to new ones, it has become clear that although sex has always been used in some, it is only more recently that the vast majority of campaigns promote their product in the usage of someone's sexuality. This highly effective method of selling goods could, however, be harmful to some young people. For example, in an advertisement for Chanel perfume, there is a typically beautiful blonde in a see-through dress, with a typically perfect body. The article is appealing because of this woman, not because of the comparatively tiny bottle of the actual perfume in the corner. The first issue I see here is that the advert is indirectly hinting to the consumer that if you buy this perfume, when you wear it you will look like this woman. Secondly, as her appearance is so attractive and seemingly perfect, no doubt with aid of special effects, this is the type of person young readers flicking through a magazine would want to be. This comes down to how the media is creating the perfect body, the perfect face, and the perfect dress, that more and more young people are becoming obsessed with. If advertising had always used a wide range of sizes and faces, the question could be raised that would aesthetically pleasing people be as small a group as they are today? Or would it all depend on personal opinion? To blame what human nature has become on advertising may well be an exaggeration, however, there is still no doubt that when the youth see 'perfect' models in these adverts, they cannot help but feel they want to be like them, just a little. The actions they take in order to achieve this are generally no problem, unless they are particularly impressionable people or insecure. This is an enormous factor of why teenagers become anorexic or depressed, when the fascination of the perfect body becomes an obsession. Possibly even more concerning is the advertisement of alcohol and cigarettes, although targeting an age group older than teenagers, subtly makes it more accessible by using very young people having a great time. Again, the use of bright colours is used along with typically attractive women, often looking independent or powerful, seductive or mysterious, depending on what mood the advert is trying to portray. Interestingly, the advertisement of cigarettes was prohibited in magazines, television and newspapers, and will be completely abolished including billboards by next month. Although this should be productive in terms of the public's health, advertising companies will lose vast amounts of money. The question on my mind here is that will alcohol go the same way? Alcohol advertisers are walking a tight rope. It has to be queried that perhaps higher standards are needed for alcohol advertising than the standard rules on truth and decency. Although alcohol brings pleasure to a great many people, it is undoubtedly dangerous and the advertising of this risk is strictly morally wrong. The advertising in itself is a weak influence on consumption as a whole; however, the visibility of it and how it reflects young drinkers' behaviour makes it an obvious target to public health authorities. It is no wonder that alcohol advertising has been banned altogether in many countries, considering the strict rules advertising companies have to regulate in the UK and Ireland yet many campaigns do not comply with their spirit. The main areas of concern as I see it in the targeting of young people are 'binge drinking' "“ drinking to get drunk and sexual success. For example, Smirnoff used a naked man, perched on a banister to advertise themselves recently, despite warnings against drink as an 'accessory to sexual relationships' and 'sexual innuendo.' The advertisement was undoubtedly both offensive and displaying drunken behaviour. Another example is when Reef shows a young lady removing a man's boxer shorts. I feel this raises an intriguing 21st century development, in how this can be considered politically correct. Is it really acceptable for young women to be shown being sexually dominant towards men? The rules have obviously been judging drinking adverts by contemporary standards of taste and decency rather than by the stricter alcohol codes. Although drinks companies probably do not purposely target the under 18s market, it is difficult to exclude them from TV schedules and magazines which target the 18-24 year olds. The styles of drinking implied in some of these advertisements are not exactly ideal if the younger audience is considered even if they may deem it beyond their responsibility. Also, the products themselves are an easy-to-drink introduction to alcohol. This all leaves us wondering if advertising is actually encouraging the younger members of society to be corrupted more easily and exposed to too many harmful images and stereotypes regarding beautiful models etc. An enormous change can already be seen if we look back a couple of generations ago, children of fifteen or sixteen would be the absolute youngest drinking alcohol and having sex etc., whereas now, an increasing number of eleven and twelve year olds are going out on drink binges every weekend. Even myself, at the mere age of fourteen, have seen fundamental changes in the way image is portrayed in younger children. Being aware of image and sexuality for people my age began at around eleven, and since I have recently been horrified by eight and nine year olds who wear make-up and sexy clothes. It is definitely concerning, let alone downright shocking to imagine what could happen in the future. The increasing acceptability of underage drinking, sex and superficial images can only leave me with pictures of rowdy and drunken seven year olds terrorizing old ladies like myself in the years to come. Whatever lengths a small percentage of people may go to in order to stop this, I am sure the majority of people want advertising to survive and continue to entertain us in all media, however, there is currently too much ammunition advertising companies are producing for their opponents, so the authorities will need to apply more vigilance in their rules in order to break away from the prospective dangers.   

n what ways is advertising seeking to affect young people and to what extent could it be construed as harmful? Eye-catching colours, phrases and people attract a consumer to look at an advert, and to absorb the information in them. These tricks of the trade have been used and...

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