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This essay will focus on an examination of the differences between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. In this essay, I shall use quotes and examples from both tabloid and broadsheet newspapers to illustrate my points. Firstly, I shall describe the physical appearances in each type of newspaper. In a typical tabloid newspaper, for example The Mirror, the banner has a plain and stenciled looking typeface, which is designed to attract the consumers attention into purchasing it, whereas in a typical broadsheet in this instant, The Times the banner has a very intricate design which gives it a distinguished look, possibly designed for the attention of the more educated and professional reader. I shall now move on to explain the use of alliteration and large and small titles to illustrate articles in tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. A typical tabloid newspaper, in this case The Mirror, uses alliteration to create dramatic and sensational titles which are again designed to persuade the reader into reading more on the article. Quote: "CRICKET: CRICKET IN CRISIS"¦" This tells us that The Mirror is attempting to attract the reader's attention by having a dramatic title to illustrate its cricket article; communicating to the reader that cricket as a whole is facing a dilemma, when in actual fact the article relates to the England Cricket Team refusing to play in Zimbabwe due to Robert Mugabe's regime. The title then reads on: "NASSER DEMANDS TO BE SAVED FROM ZIMBABWE HELL"¦" The title displays informal language, as if to communicate with the less educated reader. The Mirror also refers to Nasser Hussain the England Cricket Team captain by his first name, whereas typical broadsheet newspapers would refer to people involved in their articles by their last names in order to sound less informal and more professional; an aspect of broadsheet newspapers which appeals to the more educated reading audience. Quote: "Hussain's men plead for Zimbabwe boycott" This title, taken from The Times a broadsheet newspaper begins with a capital letter and follows with lower case letters, like a normal sentence does. It also contains more sophisticated words, like 'plead' and 'boycott'. Overall the cricket article title in The Times seems less eager to attract the reader's attention, and more keen on informing the reader of the facts behind the issue, unlike The Mirror, which seems to prefer attracting the reader's attention by using writing techniques such as whole sentences in capital letters and alliteration. I shall now compare the use of language in The Mirror and The Times. In The Mirror's cricket article, the writer of the article itself is referred to as: "Oliver Holt Chief Sports Writer", whereas the writer of The Times' cricket article is referred to more formally as: "Owen Slot, Chief Sports Reporter". The opening paragraph of The Mirror's cricket article is very informal, and it is written almost as if the writer wants to be the reader's friend. Quote: "JUST when we thought the mess couldn't get any messier, Nasser Hussain and his wandering band of white-feather wavers came along and fouled it up some more" This contrasts with the more professional and factual approach of the first paragraph in The Times' cricket article. Quote: "THE England cricket team yesterday made an urgent request for their controversial opening World Cup match on February 13 to be relocated from Zimbabwe to South Africa"¦" These paragraphs show that The Mirror is biased by taking the side of the common cricket fan, annoyed at the fact that the England Cricket Team will not go to Zimbabwe, while The Times shows no signs of being biased and continues to read in a professional manner despite whatever their personal beliefs may be. By the ninth paragraph of the cricket article, The Mirror then begins to refer to different issues that are irrelevant to the article, in an attempt to justify the situation with the England Cricket Team. Quote: "The sadness is they don't understand the precedent they have set. What happens now when British jets bomb Iraq a few weeks down the line? What happens when our military kills thousands of innocent civilians?" This suggests that The Mirror is clearly stating it's personal opinion, which some readers prefer as they can relate to them. However, this is not the case with The Times, as they keep to the subject of the article without including any other issues throughout. Quote: "It also suggests that the ECB [England and Wales Cricket Board] has failed to represent the view of the players because the players and their employers now occupy significantly differing positions." This suggests that The Times is again taking the more professional and educated approach to portraying their articles, which appeals to the more professional and educated reader. I shall now go on to explain the differences between the editorials in each of the newspapers. Editorials are the specific area in newspapers where the newspaper itself states its own views and opinions on certain news and other issues. The editorial is commonly found in the centre pages of most newspapers. In this instance I shall compare The Sun's editorial with that of The Times' editorial through their writing techniques and use of language. The Sun's editorial, which in this case is referring to the issues with the weather affecting major roads around London, starts off with an alliterated two word sentence to summarise their opinion. Quote: "White Wash". The Times however, starts off it's editorial with a less casual style of writing. Quote: "A winter's tale: Britain muddles on towards snowbound mediocrity" This shows that The Times is carrying on it's professional stance, even when giving it's own personal opinion, as The Sun being a typical tabloid newspaper carries on it's casual and friendly genre. The Sun continues this style by including puns in it's editorial to create a friendlier atmosphere for the reader. Quote: "Yes, they're up grit creek again.""¦"We are a Third World joke - run by snow good jobsworths." The Times uses different and perhaps more sophisticated writing techniques to The Sun, one such technique being the oxymoron. Quote: "British weather is predictably unpredictable". This tells us that The Times is probably using this technique to distinguish itself more from the less sophisticated tabloid newspaper. The Sun lays out it's editorial in short, summarised paragraphs, possibly to make it easier for the reader to comprehend. Quote: "The cost to the country is put at £150million" Then written underneath in a separate paragraph: "Britain is the laughing stock of the world". The Times however, keeps it's editorial's layout in neat and normal sized paragraphs, in it's continuing professional manner. Altogether, I can conclude that The Times a typical broadsheet newspaper is designed for more educated and sophisticated readers, with it's advanced writing techniques and professional layout, whereas The Sun and The Mirror typical tabloid newspapers contrast with broadsheet newspapers, and are set out for the less well educated and more casual reader, with it's friendly use of language and openly-stated opinions.
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This essay will focus on an examination of the differences between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers. In this essay, I shall use quotes and examples from both tabloid and broadsheet newspapers to illustrate my points. Firstly, I shall describe the physical appearances in each type of newspaper. In a typical tabloid newspaper, for example The Mirror, the banner has a plain and stenciled looking typeface, which is designed to attract the consumers attention into purchasing it, whereas in a typical broadsheet in this instant, The Times the banner has a very intricate design which gives it a distinguished look,...
at £150million" Then written underneath in a separate paragraph: "Britain is the laughing stock of the world".

The Times however, keeps it's editorial's layout in neat and normal sized paragraphs, in it's continuing professional manner.

Altogether, I can conclude that The Times a typical broadsheet newspaper is designed for more educated and sophisticated readers, with it's advanced writing techniques and professional layout, whereas The Sun and The Mirror typical tabloid newspapers contrast with broadsheet newspapers, and are set out for the less well educated and more casual reader, with it's friendly use of language and openly-stated opinions.

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For my GCSE practical, we chose...For my GCSE practical, we chose to create a piece of improvisation in which I was a performer. I had previously been a stage manager and so it was interesting to be in a position to see a play from a completely different perspective, as an actor. Our devised piece, Hangman was written and is set in the modern day; the 21st Century, as are many soaps of today, for example Eastenders or Coronation Street. A typical setting for many currently popular plays is the 1960's or 70's, Kes adapted from the book by Barry Hines to the play by Lawrence Till perfromed by the National Youth Theatre , Billy Liar By Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall and Abigail's Party By Mike Leigh performed at the Whitehall Theatre are all good examples of this. But we wanted our production to really strike a chord with the audience, and felt that if the events we portrayed were set in the modern day, it would all seem more real and easier to relate to. The period does not really add a great deal to the story line of Hangman. If the same events took place in for example the 60's, little would have to be altered in the plot. But take the play Journey's End By R.C. Sheriff performed at The Comedy Theatre "“ the play totally relies on its period because it is about the first world war and if it was set in the modern day there would be no war and therefore no play. The culture in which the characters live in Hangman is a fairly 'ordinary' one, in the same way as the period is not highly relevant, neither is the culture. The characters are not intended to be either middle or working class "“ it is irrelevant. The basic setting, the period and background is not so vital that if it was changed it would alter the entire play. This is similar to Sweet Panic By Poliakoff performed at The Duke of York's Theatre which is also set in an ordinary environment in which extraordinary events occur. On reflection, I perceived that Hangman was in fact, in a very similar style to the play The Woman in Black Stephen Mallatratt's adaptation of Susan Hill's original book performed at The Fortune Theatre. We chose to have a very minimalistic set, using ten wooden boxes to represent as much as we could chairs, toy box, laptop, train, grave stones and we used this in a non-naturalistic way. This is very alike to the set used in The Woman in Black. They used an old trunk for many different purposes a pony and trap, a train, a bed, a trunk!. The idea is that, although the audience knows that the people are not actually on a train, they accept it by seeing the way the actors behave when sitting on the boxes or trunk and sometimes with the help of sound effects. This is very different in soaps. The set is used in a naturalistic way, if they were to do a scene on a train, they would go to a station and film it on a real train. It would look out of place for a soap to use their set in a non-naturalistic way, and that is where one of the major differences lie between Hangman and any soap such as Coronation Street. An play that used their set in a naturalistic was is Journey's End they had a realistic looking bomb shelter with all sorts of details "“ it appeared to the audience that the actors were actually inside a real bomb shelter. We have also chosen to keep our costumes simple with a few obvious prompters to indicate whom we are representing for example, someone would draw on a white doctors' coat to represent a GP. This again is a technique used in The Woman in Black in which there is a rack of simple garments of clothing a few coats, a hat, and a scarf which are donned by different people during the course of the play in order to represent the various different characters. A strong theme running through Hangman is one of supernatural beings and ghosts. We have the ghosts of the children the doctor has killed in almost every scene and they can only ever be seen by the doctor and each other. Their presence reminds me of the narrator in Blood Brothers By Wwilly Russell, performed at The Phoenix Theatre in which the actors rarely acknowledge him, but is almost always eerily lurking in the back ground. I recognised the same theme of the supernatural when watching The Woman in Black in which there is the ghost of Jennet Humphrey. She like the narrator in Blood Brothers is also often seen lurking in the background, visible to the audience but not to the actors. But what I really mean by the term 'supernatural' is some being or creature that is not human, that has powers beyond any human being. This is seen in hundreds of plays, books and films. There is as I have previously mentioned The Woman in Black, in the book The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde The novel by Robert Louis Stevenson the character of Edward Hyde and in the film The Sixth Sense Written and directed by M. Night Shyamalon there are many ghosts. Something like this would never feature in a soap, which is typically true to life and realistic, the story lines should be believable and logical. Therefore it would be ridiculous to portray something supernatural. The basic content and characters remind me a great deal of Sweet Panic. Poliakoff wrote Sweet Panic a two years ago in 2002. It involves a child psychologist who gets incredibly immersed in her work and patients. At the end she is starting to become mentally unstable herself because of the way that her work is taking over her life, she is obsessed by it. This is very similar to Hangman in the sense that the plays both comprise of a doctor as the 'main' part and both end up thoroughly submerged in their work, so much so that it destroys their lives. I thoroughly enjoyed all the work that lead up to performing Hangman. We were able to take inspiration from the most talented of playwrights and I hope that Hangman will be enjoyable to watch.   

For my GCSE practical, we chose to create a piece of improvisation in which I was a performer. I had previously been a stage manager and so it was interesting to be in a position to see a play from a completely different perspective, as an actor. Our devised...

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